How do I apply for Social Security retirement?

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You should apply for Social Security retirement three months  before the date you want to begin your benefits. The easiest and most convenient to apply for retirement benefits way is to use our application through the Internet.

Request for retirement benefits

 

We may need certain documents in order to pay benefits. If applying online, a list of the documents which need to appear at the end of the application, even with the submission instructions which will be presented. The documents may need are:

  • Your original birth certificate or other proof of birth; [ more ] (You can also submit a copy of your birth certificate certified by the agency that issued  [English only]);
  • Proof of US citizenship or immigration status if you were not born in the United States, [ more ]
  • A copy of your military discharge papers from the US. UU. (Eg, DD-214 – Certificate of Release or Discharge from Active Duty) if you had military service before 1968; [More information ]; and
  • Your Form W-2 [More] and / or your tax own business [more] last year.

For more information, see How to apply online to receive Social Security retirement .

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A generic drug is an identical copy of another factory named. The same dosage, safety, strength, desired effect, how to use and final results, unless the trademark.

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1. What are generic drugs?

A generic drug is an identical copy of another factory named. The same dosage, safety, strength, desired effect, how to use and final results, unless the trademark.

2. Are the equally safe generic drugs to leading factory name? 

Yes. The FDA requires that all drugs are safe and effective. Being that the generic use the same active ingredients and work in the body in the same way as the original, also have the same risks and benefits.

 3. Are the equally powerful to the original generic drugs?

Yes. The FDA requires that generic drugs are of the same quality, strength, purity and stability as their counterparts with factory name.

4. generic drugs need more time to work in the body?

No. Generic drugs work in the same way and for the same period of time the drugs trade name.

5. Why are generic drugs less expensive?

One of the main reasons is because the manufacturers of generic drugs did not have to invest money to the developers of the original drug spent on the new product. New drugs are developed and protected by a patent. The patent protects the investment-including research, development, distribution and advertising-giving the company the sole right to sell the drug while it remains in effect. When approaching the expiration of the patent, manufacturers pueded submit an application to the FDA to sell generic versions of the drug. Since these manufacturers do not incur these costs desarrolllo the product as the first, can sell the generic version at substantial discounts. There is also more competition and less advertising, which helps keep the price down. Today, almost half of all drug prescriptions are replaced with generic versions.

6. Are drugs with name brand, produced in more modern facilities than generic?

No. Both facilities must meet manufacturing requirements required by the FDA. The agency does not allow drug manufacturing facilities of inferior quality. The FDA annually conducts about 3,500 inspections to ensure that regulations are met. The signatures of generic drugs work comparable to those of drugs called factory facilities. Indeed, the producers of original drugs produce approximately about 50 percent of generic drugs; frequently make copies of their own brand and other firms that are sold without the original name.

7. If the name drugs and generic factory have the same active ingredients, why they look different?

In the United States the law does not allow a generic drug look exactly the same to another name or trademark. However, a generic drug must duplicate the active ingredient of the original. The colors, flavors and some inactive ingredients may be different.

8. Is it necessary that every drug has a generic equivalent?

No. When drugs called factory were introduced, most of which were protected by a patent for 17 years.This provided protection to the originator that covered the initial costs (including research and marketing expenses) to develop the new drug. However, when the patent expires, other companies can introduce genetic competing versions, but only after being put to thorough testing by the manufacturer and FDA approved.

 9. What is the best source of information about generic drugs?

Contact your doctor, pharmacist, or insurance company for more information about its generic drugs. You can also visit the FDA on the Internet: Understanding Generic Drugs.

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Organ transplants have saved more than two million years of life in the United States over a period of 25 years, new research shows.

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HealthDay news image Organ transplants have saved more than two million years of life in the United States over a period of 25 years, new research shows.But fewer than half the people who needed a transplant in this period they received, according to a report in the online edition of the January 28 issue of the journalSurgery JAMA .

“The critical shortage of donors continues to affect this field. Just 47.9 percent of patients on the waiting list during the 25 years of the study underwent a transplant. The need is increasing, and therefore the Organ donation should increase, “wrote Dr. Abbas Rana, Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, and colleagues.

The researchers analyzed the medical records of more than 530,000 people receiving organ transplants between 1987 and 2012, and nearly 580,000 people who signed up for the waiting list but never received a transplant.

In that period, transplants saved 2.2 million life years, with an average of just over four years saved for each person who received a transplant from a living body, the study authors noted in a news release from the journal .

The number of years saved by type of organ transplant life were: kidney, 1.3 million years; liver, more than 460,000; heart, almost 270,000; lung, about 65,000: pancreas and kidney, nearly 80,000; pancreas, just under 15,000, and intestines, around 4,500.

One expert noted the relevance of the findings.

“This study highlights the importance of organ donation, and shows that solid organ transplants save lives. One organ donor can have an impact on up to 50 lives,” said Dr. Kareem Abu-Elmagd, director of the Center for transplant at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio.

“The field of transplantation continues to seek ways to save more lives,” said Abu-Elmagd. “For example, the program of ex vivo perfusion of organs of the Cleveland Clinic has been studying perfusion technology to better preserve organs donated.”

Powered by infusion, a machine pumps oxygen and nutrients to the donated enriched to prevent damage or deterioration of the body prior to transplant into a patient waiting, according to the Cleveland Clinic organ solution.

Baylor researchers suggested a direct solution.

“We call for greater support of transplantation and solid organ donation, valuable efforts have an impressive record of achievements and tremendous potential to do even more good for humanity in the future,” concluded the authors.
HealthDay, translated by HispaniCare

SOURCES: Kareem Abu-Elmagd, MD, Ph.D., director, Cleveland Clinic’s Transplant Center, Ohio; JAMA Surgery , news release, Jan. 28, 2015

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Buying prescription drugs via the Internet: A consumer guide

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The Internet has changed the way we live, work and even as bought. The advance of the Internet has made it possible to compare prices and buy products without having to leave the house. But when used for medicine is important to be very careful. Some websites sell drugs that are not legitimate, putting their health at risk.

For example, some websites that sell medicines:

  • They are not licensed pharmacies with state of the United States or are not really pharmacies.

  • They can give an incorrect diagnosis or sell you a drug that is not appropriate for your medical condition.

  • Do not protect your personal data (eg social security number and credit cards).

Some of the drugs that are sold on the Internet:

  • They are fake (counterfeit or adulterated).

  • They are very strong medicine dose or very low concentration.

  • They contain ingredients that can be harmful to your health.

  • They are expired or expired medicines.

  • They have not been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA for its acronym in English), or have not been studied for their safety and efficacy.

  • They have been prepared using safe standards.

  • They are not safe for use with other medicines or products you use.

  • No right or have not been properly stored or shipped labels.

TALK TO YOUR DOCTOR BEFORE TAKING ANY MEDICINE FOR THE FIRST TIME

  • Talk to your doctor and get a physical before taking any medicine for the first time.

  • Use only medications that have been prescribed by your doctor or other health professional you trust, who is licensed in the United States to give prescriptions or prescriptions.

  • Ask your doctor if you have to do something specific for your prescription.

The following information will help protect (a) if you purchase medicines via the Internet:

KNOW WHERE YOUR MEDICINES COME TO MAKE SURE THEY ARE SAFE

Make sure that the website where you buy your drugs is state-licensed pharmacy in the United States and you are located in the United States. Pharmacies and pharmacists in the United States must be licensed by a state pharmacy board. The pharmacy board of the state where you reside, you can tell if the website you use is a state-licensed pharmacy if you have good reputation, and if you are located in the United States. For a list of state pharmaceutical boards in English at the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy (NABP) whose website is:www.nabp.net . For information in Spanish call toll free 1-866-SU-FAMILIA (1-866-783-2645), the Li line Telefónica Health National Hispanic Family.

The NABP is a professional association of pharmaceutical state boards. This association has a program that will help you find some of the pharmacies that are licensed to sell through the Internet. The websites where the hallmark of this program appears, have been checked to ensure they comply with federal and state regulations. For more information in English about this program and for a list of pharmacies where VIPPS® (Verified Internet Pharmacy Practice Sites ™) seal appears, visit the website: www.vipps.info . For information in Spanish call toll free 1-866-SU-FAMILIA (1-866-783-2645) National Helpline Hispanic Family Health.

. Find the websites whose practices are designed to protect you a secure website should:

  • Be located in the United States and be licensed by the state pharmacy board which operates the website (visit the website www.nabp.net for a list of state pharmaceutical boards in English). For information in Spanish call toll free 1-866-SU-FAMILIA (1-866-783-2645) National Helpline Hispanic Family Health.

  • Have a licensed pharmacist who can answer your questions.

  • Require a prescription from your doctor or other health professional who is licensed in the United States to give prescriptions or prescriptions.

  • Having a medium through which you can talk to a person if you have any problem.

MAKE SURE YOUR PRIVACY IS PROTECTED

Note that the privacy and security of the site you will find easy to use and understand.

Do not give any personal information (such as your Social Security number, the number of your credit card or your medical history) unless you are sure the website will keep the protected information and not made public.

Ensure that the website will not sell your personal information unless you authorize it.

PROTECT YOURSELF AND OTHERS

Report the web sites you do not feel safe (a), or those for which you have complaints. Visit the website www.fda.gov/buyonline and click under “Notify the FDA sites web troubled “to fill the form in Spanish.

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Opioid analgesics widely prescribed to women of reproductive age

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Women 15 to 44 years who filled a prescription of opioid analgesics 2008-2012Graphic: Women aged 15 to 44 who filled a prescription of opioid analgesics 2008-2012

  • With private insurance: 28%
  • Enrolled in Medicaid: 39%

More than a third of women of reproductive age who are enrolled in Medicaid and more than a quarter of those with private insurance, filled a prescription opioid analgesics per year during the period from 2008 to 2012, according to an article published this week in Weekly Morbidity and Mortality Report (MMWR).

Usually, health care providers prescribe opioids to treat moderate to severe pain. They are also found as a component of some prescription cough medicines. Prescription opioids more frequently in both groups of women were hydrocodone, codeine and oxycodone.

“Taking opioid analgesics in early pregnancy can cause birth defects and serious problems for the baby and the mother,” said CDC Director Tom Frieden, MD, MPH “Many women of reproductive age are taking these drugs and may not know they are pregnant, and thus unwittingly may be putting their unborn child. It is therefore important that health professionals make them an evaluation of comprehensive health care to women of childbearing age before will prescribe these drugs, “he added.

The CDC researchers analyzed data from 2008 to 2012 two large datasets health insurance claims: one of women 15 to 44 years with private health insurance and other women in the same age group enrolled in Medicaid . They found that, on average, 39 percent of women enrolled in Medicaid filled a prescription for opioids in an outpatient pharmacy per year, compared to 28 percent of women with private insurance.

The highest rates of prescription opioids among Medicaid participants may be due to differences in prescription drugs covered in their health insurance plans, to differences in the use of health care services or differences in the prevalence of other conditions in Medicaid participants compared to people with private insurance coverage.

The data by geographic region available on private insurance claims indicate that opioid prescribing rates were highest among women of reproductive age in the South and lowest in the Northeast were. Were available for racial and ethnic information on Medicaid data, which indicated that the prescription of opioids was almost 1.5 times higher among non-Hispanic white women of reproductive age, compared with non-Hispanic black or Hispanic women.

Previous studies on the use of opioids during pregnancy suggest that these drugs may increase the risk of neural tube defects (serious defects of the brain and spine of the baby), congenital heart defects and gastroschisis (a defect in the wall baby’s abdomen). There is also a risk of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS, for its acronym in English) due to exposure to drugs such as opioids during pregnancy. Neonatal abstinence syndrome occurs when a baby has withdrawal symptoms to medications or drugs taken by the mother during pregnancy.

“Women who are pregnant or planning to become pregnant should talk to your healthcare provider about the risks and benefits of any medication you are taking or considering taking,” said Coleen Boyle, Ph.D., MS.Hyg., Director of National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, CDC. “This new information highlights the importance of prescribing medicines responsibly, especially opioids, women of reproductive age,” he added.

The National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities CDC is working to provide better information to women and their health care providers about drug use during pregnancy through the initiative Treatment for two: Safer Drug Use during pregnancy . Through it, CDC is working with its partners, other federal agencies and the public to understand trends in drug use among pregnant women and women of childbearing age, and to provide women and providers care about the safety or risk of using certain medications during pregnancy. This information will enable women and their health care providers make informed decisions for the treatment of diseases during pregnancy.

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One of the biggest obstacles for families with young children is the rising cost of of child care.

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Middle-class economics is the key to restoring the link between hard work and being able to get ahead. It’s about giving everyone the same set of rules so everyone has a fair shot of getting ahead. But, right now, one of the biggest obstacles for families with young children is the rising cost of of child care.

Providing for child care is something we used to view as a national security. Read more about the lessons we need to learn from that time in our history here.

Today, after delivering his State of the Union address this week, President Obama stopped by the University of Kansas in Lawrence, KS to lay out his plan to help alleviate this load for every middle-class family who is working and trying to boom young children.

Here’s what his plan will do for millions: 

1. Make a landmark investment in the Child Care and Development Fund that helps every eligible family with young children afford high-quality child care.

Here’s why:

2. Triple the maximum child care tax credit to $3,000 per young child.

Here’s why:

3. Create a new innovation fund to help states design programs that better serve families that face unique challenges in finding quality care, such as those in rural areas or working non-traditional hours. 

Here’s why:

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How can I prepare for breastfeeding before I give birth?

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How can I prepare for breastfeeding before I give birth?

baby-breastfeedingTo prepare for breastfeeding, the most important thing you can do is have confidence in yourself and to plan ahead. Committing to breastfeeding starts with the conviction that you can do it!

Other steps you can take to prepare for breastfeeding are:

  • Get good prenatal care, which can help you avoid early delivery. Babies born too early have more problems with breastfeeding.
  • Tell your doctor about your plans to breastfeed, and ask if the place where you plan to deliver your baby has the staff and setup to support successful breastfeeding. Some hospitals and birth centers have taken special steps to create the best possible environment for successful breastfeeding. These places are called Baby-Friendly Hospitals and Birth Centers.
  • Take a breastfeeding class. Pregnant women who comprehend about how to breastfeed are more likely to be successful at breastfeeding than those who do not. Breastfeeding classes offer pregnant women and their partners the chance to prepare and ask questions before the baby’s arrival.
  • Ask your doctor to recommend a lactation consultant. You can establish a contact with a lactation consultant before the baby comes so that you will have support ready after the baby is born.
  • Talk to your doctor about your health. Discuss any breast surgery or injury you may have had. If you have depression, or are taking supplements or medicines, talk with your doctor about treatments that can work with breastfeeding.
  • Tell your doctor that you would like to breastfeed as soon as possible after delivery. The sucking instinct is very strong within the baby’s first hour of life.
  • Talk to friends who have breastfed, or consider joining a breastfeeding support group.
  • Talk to fathers, partners, and other family members about how they can help you successfully breastfeed. Partners and family members can:
    • Support your breastfeeding by being kind and encouraging
    • Show their love and appreciation for all of the work that goes into breastfeeding
    • Be good listeners if you need to talk about any breastfeeding concerns you might have
    • Help make sure you have enough to drink and get enough rest
    • Help around the house
    • Take care of any other children who are at home
    • Give the baby love through playing and cuddling
  • Get the items you will need for breastfeeding, such as nursing bras, covers, and nursing pillows.
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It’s unfortunate how many people believe that estate planning is only for wealthy people.

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Know the Ins and Outs

It’s unfortunate how many people consider that estate arranging is only for wealthy people. People at all economic layers benefit from an estate plan. Upon death, an estate plan legally protects and distributes property based on your wishes and the needs of your family and/or survivors with as little tax as possible.

A will is the most practical first step in estate arranging; it makes clear how you wish your property to be distributed after you die.

Writing a will can be as simple as typing out how you wish your assets to be transferred to loved ones or charitable organizations after your death. If you don’t have a will at the time you die, your estate will be handled in probate, and your property could be distributed differently than what you would like.

It may help to get legal advice at the time writing a will, particularly at the time it comes to understanding all the rules of the estate disposition process in your state. Some states, for instance, have community-property laws that entitle your surviving spouse to keep half of your wealth after you die no matter what percentage you leave him or her. Fees for the execution of a will vary according to its complexity.

Rules To Remember When Writing A Will

  • In most states, you must be 18 years of age or older.
  • A will must be written in sound judgment and mental capacity to be valid.
  • The document must clearly state that it is your will.
  • An executor of your will, who ensures your estate is distributed according to your wishes, must be named.
  • It is not necessary to notarize or record your will but these can safeguard against any claims that your will is invalid. To be valid, you must sign a will in the presence of at least two witnesses.

Choose an Executor

An executor is the person who is responsible for settling the estate after death. Duties of an executor include:

  • Taking inventory of property and belongings
  • Appraising and distributing assets
  • Paying taxes
  • Settling debts owed by the deceased

Most importantly, the executor is legally obligated to act in the interests of the deceased, following the wishes provided by the will. Here again, it could be helpful to consult an attorney to help with the probate process or offer legal guidance. Any person over the age of 18, who hasn’t been convicted of a felony, can be named executor of a will. Some people choose a lawyer, accountant or financial consultant based on their experience. Others choose a spouse, adult child, relative or friend. Since the role of executor can be demanding, it’s often a good idea to ask the person being named in a will if he or she is willing to serve.

If you’ve been named executor in someone’s will but are not able or do not wish to serve, you need to file a declination, which is a legal document that declines your designation as an executor. The contingent executor named in the will then assumes responsibility. If no contingent executor is named, the court will appoint one.

Choose Beneficiaries

As you write your will, you need to decide who you wish to inherit your assets to ensure that your possessions are transferred as you want. Primary beneficiaries are your first choice to receive your assets. You should also consider choosing secondary or contingent beneficiaries. If your primary beneficiary dies before you do or does not meet a condition (ex. age) for inheritance, your secondary beneficiaries will receive your assets. Designating asecondary beneficiary can also prevent going through probate, which can be time consuming and expensive. Use specific names instead of broad categories like “nieces and nephews” at the time naming beneficiaries in your will.

You should also add primary and secondary beneficiaries on your individual bank accounts, the deeds to your homes and cars, contents of your safe deposit boxes, investments and insurance policies to make it easier to transfer the assets. Also, remember that establishing someone as a power of attorney does not automatically make this person a beneficiary of your assets. After you die, this person will not have the right to the money or to even access your account. If you wish this person to be a beneficiary, you must state it in your will.

Review Your Estate Plan

Once you’ve completed a will, it’s a good idea to review it from time to time, and consider changes if:

  • The value of your assets change
  • You marry, divorce or remarry
  • You have a child
  • You move to a different state
  • The executor of your will dies or becomes incapacitated or your contact changes
  • One of your heirs dies
  • The laws affecting your estate change

Write a Social Media Will

Social media is a part of daily life, so what happens to the online content that you created once you die? If you are active online you should consider creating a statement of how you would like your online identity to be handled, like a social media will. You should appoint someone you trust as an online executor. This person will be responsible for the closure of your email addresses, social media profiles, and blogs after you are deceased. Take these steps to help you write a social media will (download a social media will template in Excel format):

  • Review the privacy policies and the terms and conditions of each website where you have a presence.
  • State how you would like your profiles to be handled. You may wish to completely cancel your profile or keep it up for friends and family to visit. Some sites allow users to create a memorial profile where other users can still see your profile but can’t post anything new.
  • Give the social media executor a document that lists all the websites where you have a profile, along with your usernames and passwords.
  • Stipulate in your will that the online executor should have a copy of your death certificate. The online executor may need this as proof in order for websites to take any actions on your behalf.
  • Check to see if the social media platforms have account management features to let you proactively manage what happens to your accounts after you die. For example, Google’s Inactive Account Manager allows you to manage how you wish your online content to be saved or deleted. This feature also lets you give permission for your family or close friends to access the content you saved on Google websites after you die.
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“Because you pay your income taxes on time, you have been awarded a free $12,500 government grant! To get your grant, simply give us your checking account information, and we will direct-deposit the grant into your bank account!”

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Sometimes, it’s an ad that claims you will qualify to receive a “free grant” to pay for education costs, home repairs, home business expenses, or unpaid bills. Other times, it’s a phone call supposedly from a “government” agency or some other organization with an official sounding name. In either case, the claim is the same: your application for a grant is guaranteed to be accepted, and you’ll never have to pay the money back.

But the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the nation’s consumer protection agency, says that “money for nothing” grant offers usually are scams, whether you see them in your local paper or a national magazine, or hear about them on the phone.

Some scam artists advertise “free grants” in the classifieds, inviting readers to call a toll-free number for more information. Others are more bold: they call you out of the blue. They lie about where they’re calling from, or they claim legitimacy using an official-sounding name like the “Federal Grants Administration.” They may ask you some basic questions to determine if you “qualify” to receive a grant. FTC attorneys say calls and come-ons for free money invariably are rip offs.

Grant scammers generally follow a script: they congratulate you on your eligibility, then ask for your checking account information so they can “deposit your grant directly into your account,” or cover a one-time “processing fee.” The caller may even reassure you that you can get a refund if you’re not satisfied. In fact, you’ll never see the grant they promise; they will disappear with your money.

The FTC says following a few basic rules can keep consumers from losing money to these “government grant” scams:

  • Don’t give out your bank account information to anyone you don’t know. Scammers pressure people to divulge their bank account information so that they can steal the money in the account. Always keep your bank account information confidential. Don’t share it unless you are familiar with the company and appercive why the information is necessary.
  • Don’t pay any money for a “free” government grant. If you have to pay money to claim a “free” government grant, it isn’t really free. A real government agency won’t ask you to pay a processing fee for a grant that you have already been awarded — or to pay for a list of grant-making institutions. The names of agencies and foundations that award grants are available for free at any public library or on the Internet. The only official access point for all federal grant-making agencies is www.grants.gov.
  • Look-alikes aren’t the real thing. Just because the caller says he’s from the “Federal Grants Administration” doesn’t mean that he is. There is no such government agency. Take a moment to check the blue pages in your telephone directory to bear out your hunch — or not.
  • Phone numbers can deceive. Some con artists use Internet technology to disguise their area code in caller ID systems. Although it may look like they’re calling from Washington, DC, they could be calling from anywhere in the world.
  • Take control of the calls you receive. If you wish to reduce the number of telemarketing calls you receive, place your telephone number on the National Do Not Call Registry. To register online, visit donotcall.gov. To register by phone, call 1-888-382-1222 (TTY: 1-866-290-4236) from the phone number you wish to register.
  • File a complaint with the FTC. If you think you may have been a victim of a government grant scam, file a complaint with the FTC online, or call toll-free, 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357); TTY: 1-866-653-4261. The FTC enters Internet, telemarketing, identity theft, and other fraud-related complaints into Consumer Sentinel, a secure online database available to hundreds of civil and criminal law enforcement agencies in the U.S. and abroad.
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Beans and peas are excellent sources of plant protein, and also provide other nutrients such as iron and zinc

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Beans and peas are unique foods

bowl of beansBeans and peas are the mature forms of legumes. They include kidney beans, pinto beans, black beans, lima beans, black-eyed peas, garbanzo beans (chickpeas), split peas and lentils. They are available in dry, canned, and frozen forms. These foods are excellent sources of plant protein, and also provide other nutrients such as iron and zinc. They are similar to meats, poultry, and fish in their contribution of these nutrients. Therefore, they are considered part of the Protein Foods Group. Many people consider beans and peas as vegetarian alternatives for meat. However, they are also considered part of the Vegetable Group because they are excellent sources of dietary fiber and nutrients such as folate and potassium. These nutrients, which are often low in the diet of many Americans, are also found in other vegetables.

Because of their high nutrient content, consuming beans and peas is recommended for everyone, including people who also eat meat, poultry, and fish regularly. The USDA Food Patterns classify beans and peas as a subgroup of the Vegetable Group. The USDA Food Patterns also indicate that beans and peas may be counted as part of the Protein Foods Group. Individuals can count beans and peas as either a vegetable or a protein food.

Green peas, green lima beans, and green (string) beans are not considered to be part of the beans and peas subgroup. Green peas and green lima beans are similar to other starchy vegetables and are grouped with them. Green beans are grouped with other vegetables such as onions, lettuce, celery, and cabbage because their nutrient content is similar to those foods.

How to count beans and peas in the USDA food patterns:

Generally, individuals who regularly eat meat, poultry, and fish would count beans and peas in the Vegetable Group. Vegetarians, vegans, and individuals who seldom eat meat, poultry, or fish would count some of the beans and peas they eat in the Protein Foods Group. Here’s an example for both ways:

Count the number of ounce-equivalents of all meat, poultry, fish, eggs, nuts, and seeds eaten.

  1. If the total is equal to or more than the suggested intake from the Protein Foods Group (which ranges from 2 ounce-equivalents at 1000 calories to 7 ounce-equivalents at 2800 calories and above) then count any beans or peas eaten as part of the beans and peas subgroup in the Vegetable Group.OR

  2. If the total is less than the suggested intake from the Protein Foods Group, then count any beans and peas eaten toward the suggested intake layer until it is reached. (One-fourth cup of cooked beans or peas counts as 1 ounce equivalent in the Protein Foods Group.) After the suggested intake layer in the Protein Foods Group is reached, count any additional beans or peas eaten as part of the beans and peas subgroup in the Vegetable Group.

 

Examples

  1. Example 1: (For the 2,000-calorie food pattern)

    Foods eaten (Protein Foods Group only – not a complete daily list)

    • 3½ ounces chicken
    • 2 ounces tuna fish
    • ½ cup refried beans

    The 3½ ounces of chicken and 2 ounces of tuna fish equal 5½ ounce-equivalents in the Protein Foods Group, which meets the recommendation at this calorie layer. Therefore, the ½ cup of refried beans counts as ½ cup of vegetables towards meeting the 1½ cups per week recommendation for beans and peas in the 2,000-calorie pattern.

  2. Example 2: (For the 2,000-calorie food pattern)

    Foods eaten (Protein Foods Group only – not a complete daily list)

    • 2 eggs
    • 1½ Tbsp. peanut butter
    • ½ cup chickpeas

    The 2 eggs and 1½ Tbsp. peanut butter equal 3½ ounce-equivalents in the Protein Foods Group. Two more ounces are needed to meet the 5½ ounce recommendation for this group. Since the daily recommendation for the Protein Foods Group has not been met, these remaining 2 ounce-equivalents are provided by the ½ cup of chickpeas. This ½ cup of chickpeas would not count toward meeting the 1½ cups per week recommendation for the beans and peas vegetable subgroup in the 2,000-calorie pattern. Instead, it would count as part of the Protein Foods Group.

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