CELESTE TEXAS NEWS AND BLOG


Latest News - CELESTE TEXAS

ET Soccer: Longview boys edge Greenville 1-0, more


HALLSVILLE 2, TEXAS HIGH 0: HALLSVILLE — Gustavo Lilly and Juan Lopez ...
LONGVIEW 5, GREENVILLE 0: GREENVILLE — Celeste Nunez and Bianca Jiminez each notched a pair of goals as the Lady Lobos rolled past Greenville, 5-0, in District 15-5A action.

IPO Preview: InfraREIT


Northeast Texas in and around Celeste and South Texas near McAllen. HIFR is externally managed by Hunt Utility Services. HIFR leases its T&D assets to its tenant, Sharyland, a Texas-based utility regulated by the Public Utility Commission of Texas (PUCT).

A weekend in nearby Death Valley


Where to stay For those who have an RV or are willing to pitch a tent, Texas Springs, Sunset and Furnace Creek campgrounds are good options. Furnace Creek takes reservations, if you’re worried about a crowd beating you there, though Texas Springs is a ...

Mary Vick Scott Hamilton


Vicki, as her husband liked to call her, was a devoted and loving mother of three girls, Laura, Celeste and Barbara. She raised her girls in Texas moving frequently to follow Kenneth’s career in the oil tool business. Llano was their retreat and she was ...

Police arrest man allegedly stopped with cocaine, meth


Commerce, Texas (KETK) — Commerce Police arrested a man Saturday ...
The driver, identified as 35-year-old James Lowell Carson of Celeste, was arrested for traffic violations. In the vehicle, officers recovered about 14.7 grams of suspected ...

William B. ‘Bill’ Hansen


Mary Hansen of Longview, Claire Cassidy of Bellingham, Celeste Cassidy of Seattle, and Ace Cassidy of Bellingham; two sisters, Fern Gregory of Roanoke, Texas, and Lois Hammit of Citrus Heights, Calif.; a brother, Robert Hansen of San Diego, Calif.;

Arts and entertainment calendar


The Texas Badland Band will play ...
Prom is directed by Dave Feranchak, with musical direction by Clay West and Celeste Matthews, choreography by Amanda Bond and Katie Ogorchock. The orchestra is directed by Bobby Heathcock and Becca Babbitt serves ...

Marguerite Talbot Daigle


In addition, she is survived by her niece, Connie Percle Richard, her husband, David, daughters Lisa, Michelle and Celeste and their families ...
as a resident of Autumn Grove Cottage in Katy, Texas, where she was lovingly cared for by Pat Jackson and ...

CISD in market for a 'super'


Clark moved to his alma mater, Celeste in 1996, where he served as junior high principal until his acceptance of the superintendent’s position in 2001. He is a 1980 graduate of East Texas University and earned his Master’s of Eduction Administration in ...

Hail Damage Repair in McKinney, Fairview, Melissa, Princeton, Leonard, Celeste TX by Linear Automotive


Get the best automotive hail damage repair in McKinney, Fairview, Melissa, Princeton, Leonard, and Celeste, TX at Linear Automotive. Paintless dent repair and removal will be provided at Linear Automotive in response to the hailstorm that affected areas ...




SPECIAL INFORMATION FOR CELESTE

Warning in CELESTE: Government Grant Scams

“Because you pay your income taxes on time, you have been awarded a free $12,500 government grant! To get your grant, simply give us your checking account information, and we will direct-deposit the grant into your bank account!”

Sometimes, it’s an ad that claims you will qualify to receive a “free grant” to pay for education costs, home repairs, home business expenses, or unpaid bills. Other times, it’s a phone call supposedly from a “government” agency or some other organization with an official sounding name. In either case, the claim is the same: your application for a grant is guaranteed to be accepted, and you’ll never have to pay the money back.

But the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the nation’s consumer protection agency, says that “money for nothing” grant offers usually are scams, whether you see them in your local paper or a national magazine, or hear about them on the phone.

Some scam artists advertise “free grants” in the classifieds, inviting readers to call a toll-free number for more information. Others are more bold: they call you out of the blue. They lie about where they’re calling from, or they claim legitimacy using an official-sounding name like the “Federal Grants Administration.” They may ask you some basic questions to determine if you “qualify” to receive a grant. FTC attorneys say calls and come-ons for free money invariably are rip offs.

Grant scammers generally follow a script: they congratulate you on your eligibility, then ask for your checking account information so they can “deposit your grant directly into your account,” or cover a one-time “processing fee.” The caller may even reassure you that you can get a refund if you’re not satisfied. In fact, you’ll never see the grant they promise; they will disappear with your money.

The FTC says following a few basic rules can keep consumers from losing money to these “government grant” scams:

  • Don’t give out your bank account information to anyone you don’t know. Scammers pressure people to divulge their bank account information so that they can steal the money in the account. Always keep your bank account information confidential. Don’t share it unless you are familiar with the company and know why the information is necessary.
  • Don’t pay any money for a “free” government grant. If you have to pay money to claim a “free” government grant, it isn’t really free. A real government agency won’t ask you to pay a processing fee for a grant that you have already been awarded — or to pay for a list of grant-making institutions. The names of agencies and foundations that award grants are available for free at any public library or on the Internet. The only official access point for all federal grant-making agencies is www.grants.gov.
  • Look-alikes aren’t the real thing. Just because the caller says he’s from the “Federal Grants Administration” doesn’t mean that he is. There is no such government agency. Take a moment to check the blue pages in your telephone directory to bear out your hunch — or not.
  • Phone numbers can deceive. Some con artists use Internet technology to disguise their area code in caller ID systems. Although it may look like they’re calling from Washington, DC, they could be calling from anywhere in the world.
  • Take control of the calls you receive. If you want to reduce the number of telemarketing calls you receive, place your telephone number on the National Do Not Call Registry. To register online, visit donotcall.gov. To register by phone, call 1-888-382-1222 (TTY: 1-866-290-4236) from the phone number you wish to register.
  • File a complaint with the FTC. If you think you may have been a victim of a government grant scam, file a complaint with the FTC online, or call toll-free, 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357); TTY: 1-866-653-4261. The FTC enters Internet, telemarketing, identity theft, and other fraud-related complaints into Consumer Sentinel, a secure online database available to hundreds of civil and criminal law enforcement agencies in the U.S. and abroad.
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CELESTE TEXAS tspan:3m CELESTE TEXAS




Avoiding job scams in CELESTE

Scammers know that finding a job can be tough. To trick people looking for honest work, scammers advertise where real employers and job placement firms do. They also make upbeat promises about your chances of employment, and virtually all of them ask you to pay them for their services before you get a job. But the promise of a job isn’t the same thing as a job. If you have to pay for the promise, it’s likely a scam.

Signs of a Job Scam

Scammers advertise jobs where legitimate employers do — online, in newspapers, and even on TV and radio. Here’s how to tell whether a job lead may be a scam:

You need to pay to get the job

They may say they’ve got a job waiting, or guarantee to place you in a job, if you just pay a fee for certification, training materials, or their expenses placing you with a company. But after you pay, the job doesn’t materialize. Employers and employment firms shouldn’t ask you to pay for the promise of a job.

You need to supply your credit card or bank account information

Don´t give out your credit card or bank account information over the phone to a company unless you´re familiar with them and have agreed to pay for something. Anyone who has your account information can use it.

The ad is for "previously undisclosed" federal government jobs

Information about available federal jobs is free. And all federal positions are announced to the public on usajobs.gov. Don’t believe anyone who promises you a federal or postal job.

Job Placement Services

Many job placement services are legitimate. But others lie about what they’ll do for you, promote outdated or fake job openings, or charge up-front fees for services that may not lead to a job. In fact, they might not even return your calls once you pay.

Before you enlist a company’s help:

Check with the hiring company

If a company or organization is mentioned in an ad or interview, contact that company to find out if the company really is hiring through the service.

Get details — in writing

What’s the cost, what will you get, and who pays — you or the company that hires you? What happens if the service doesn’t find a job for you or any real leads? If they’re reluctant to answer your questions, or give confusing answers, you should be reluctant to work with them.

Get a copy of the contract with the placement firm, and read it carefully. A legitimate company will give you time to read the contract and decide, not pressure you into signing then and there. Make sure any promises — including refund promises — are in writing. Some listing services and "consultants" write ads to sound like jobs, but that’s just a marketing trick: They´re really selling general information about getting a job — information you can find for free on your own.

Know whether it’s job placement or job counseling

Executive or career counseling services help people with career directions and decisions. They may offer services like skills identification and self-evaluation, resume preparation, letter writing, and interview techniques, and general information about companies or organizations in a particular location or job field.

But job placement isn’t guaranteed. Fees can be as high as thousands of dollars, and you often have to pay first.

The National Career Development Association (NCDA) offers some tips on finding and choosing a career counselor, and explains the different types of counselors active in the field.

Check for complaints

Your local consumer protection agency, state Attorney General´s Office, and the Better Business Bureau can tell you whether any complaints have been filed about a company. Just keep in mind that a lack of complaints doesn’t mean the business is on the up-and-up. You may want to do an internet search with the name of the company and words like review, scam, or complaint. Look through several pages of search results. And check out articles about the company in newspapers, magazines, or online, as well.

Where to Look for Jobs

You’ve read the many resume and interview tips from respected sources available for free online, and scoured online job boards and newspaper classifieds. Some other places to look for leads in your job search include:

CareerOneStop

Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor, CareerOneStop lists hundreds of thousands of jobs. It also links to employment and training programs in each state, including programs for people with disabilities, minorities, older workers, veterans, welfare recipients, and young people. For federal jobs, all open federal positions are announced to the public on usajobs.gov.

State and county offices

Your state’s Department of Labor may have job listings or be able to point you to local job offices that offer counseling and referrals. Local and county human resources offices provide some placement assistance, too. They can give you the names of other groups that may be helpful, such as labor unions or federally-funded vocational programs.

College career service offices

Whether it’s a four-year university or community college, see what help yours can offer. If you’re not a current or former student, some still may let you look at their job listings.

Your library

Ask if they can point you to information on writing a resume, interviewing, or compiling a list of companies and organizations to contact about job openings.

Report a Job Scam

If you’ve been targeted by a job scam, file a complaint with the FTC.

For problems with an employment-service firm, contact the appropriate state licensing board (if these firms must be licensed in your state), your state Attorney General, and your local consumer protection agency.

To learn about credit and background checks when you’re looking for a job, read What to Know When You Look For a Job.

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How I can eat a healthy diet?

The body needs minerals, vitamins and other nutrients to stay healthy. A healthy diet means you are eating:


  • Vegetables, fruits, whole grains and non-fat dairy and low-fat
  • Fish, seafood, chicken or turkey, lean meats and low-fat, eggs, beans, peas (peas), seeds and nuts


    Limit your intake of foods rich in:


  • Cholesterol, sodium (salt) and added sugar.
  • Fat trans: fats trans can be found in foods such as cakes (or cakes), cookies, margarine that comes in bars and fried foods.
  • Saturated fats: These fats are in animal products such as cheese, high-fat meats, whole milk and butter.
  • Refined grains: refined grain products include white bread, pasta, white rice and flour tortillas, among others.


    Get a personalized diet plan to help you choose healthy foods



    Having too much cholesterol in the blood can cause heart disease or heart attack. Approximately one in six people in the United States have high cholesterol. You may have high cholesterol and not know it. Good thing its easy to get tested for cholesterol, and if you go too high, you can take steps to control it.


    Who should be tested for cholesterol?


  • Men who are 35 or more
  • Men under 35 who have heart disease or are at risk of suffering from
  • Women who have heart disease or are at risk of suffering from


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