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Tennessee assistant coach Adam Howard resigns


KNOXVILLE, Tenn. Tennessee men's basketball assistant coach Adam Howard has resigned for what the school has described as personal reasons. The school announced Monday in a brief statement that Howard, who had previously worked with Tennessee coach Donnie ...

Rivers: Clippers without Barnes vs. Hornets


CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — Clippers coach Doc Rivers says forward ...
and they don't have much time to do it. After disposing of the Tennessee Titans...
CLEVELAND (AP) — Brian Hoyer's crucial mistakes nearly cost the Browns a win. However, the ...

Grizzlies rout Clippers 107-91, improve to 12-2


MEMPHIS, Tennessee -- Spain's Marc Gasol scored 30 points and grabbed ...
The Grizzlies enjoyed the biggest blowout of a night that saw Miami edge Charlotte 94-93 on Chris Bosh's baseline jump shot with 31 seconds remaining and Portland improve to 10-3 ...

Tennessee bank branches did something unusual last quarter: they multiplied


Earlier this year, the Charlotte-based bank, which is the largest in the Nashville area by deposits, sold more than a dozen Tennessee branches to First Tennessee Bank. JPMorgan Chase, meanwhile, has decreased its branch network by 41 branches. Atlanta ...

Tennessee's premature birth rate up slightly, short of national average


When the couple returned the next morning to the University of Tennessee Medical Center, Charlotte had gained weight and lay in an open crib, free of tubes. She came home Thursday. “It was a complete shock. I was almost in tears,” said Charlotte’s ...



SPECIAL INFORMATION FOR CHARLOTTE

How women tend to react to stress?

How women tend to react to stress?

We all have to deal with stressful situations such as traffic, fights with spouse, and work problems. Some researchers believe that women handle stress in a unique way: engage and befriend.

  • Dealing: women protect and care for their children
  • Befriend: women seeking and receiving social support

In times of stress, women tend to care for their children and get support from their female friends. Women organisms produce chemicals that are believed to promote these reactions. One of these chemicals is oxytocin, which has a calming effect during times of stress. This is the same chemical that is released during childbirth and that is found in higher levels in lactating women, who are believed to be calmer and more sociable than those who do not. Women also have estrogen hormone, which enhances the effects of oxytocin. Men, on the other hand, have high levels of testosterone in times of stress, which blocks the calming effects of oxytocin and causes hostility, withdrawal and anger.

How does stress affect my body and my health?

We all suffer stress. There are short-term stress, such as getting lost when driving or missing the bus. To everyday situations, such as planning a meal or making time for errands, can be stressful. This type of stress can make us feel worried or anxious.

At other times we face long-term stress, such as racial discrimination, a fatal illness, or porce. These stressful events can also affect your health in different ways. The long-term stress can increase your risk for certain medical conditions, such as depression problems.

Both short-term stress and long-term stress can affect your body. The research is beginning to show the serious effects of stress on our body. Stress triggers changes in our body and makes it more likely you sick. It can also worsen problems and suffering. You can influence the following problems:

  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Headaches
  • Constipation
  • Diarrhea
  • Irritability
  • Lack of energy
  • Lack of concentration
  • Overeating or not eating
  • Anger
  • Sadness
  • Increased risk of asthma attacks or arthritis
  • Tension
  • Stomach cramps
  • Bloating
  • Skin problems such as urticaria
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Weight gain or loss
  • Heart problems
  • Hypertension
  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome
  • Diabetes
  • Neck or back pain
  • Decreased sexual desire
  • Trouble getting pregnant

What are some of the most stressful life events?

Any change in our lives can be stressful, even some of the happiest, like having a baby or starting a new job. Here are some of the most stressful life events:

  • Death of a spouse
  • porce
  • Separation
  • Going to jail
  • Death of a close relative
  • Illness or injury
  • Marriage
  • Pregnancy
  • Retirement

Scale of Life Events Holmes and Rahe (1967)

What is Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)?

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD for short) is a debilitating condition that can occur after being exposed to a terrifying event or experience in which serious physical harm occurred or the threat thereof. Among the traumatic events that may trigger PTSD include violent attacks on the person, such as rape or mugging, natural disasters or caused by man, accidents, or military combat.

Many people with PTSD repeatedly relive the experience through episodes of flashbacks, memories, nightmares, or frightening thoughts, especially when exposed to events or objects that remind them of the trauma. Anniversaries of the event can also trigger symptoms. People with PTSD may also experience emotional numbness, sleep disturbances, depression, anxiety, irritability or outbursts of anger. Feelings of intense guilt are also common (called survivor guilt), especially if other people did not survive the traumatic event.

Most people who are exposed to a traumatic and stressful event suffer some symptoms of PTSD in the days and weeks following the event, but the symptoms usually disappear. However, about 8% of men and 20% of women go on to develop PTSD, and roughly 30% of these inpiduals develop a chronic or long-term PTSD continuing for the rest of their lives variety.

How I can help manage my stress?

Do not let stress the disease. Women usually carry a higher burden of stress we should. Often we are not even aware of our stress level. Pay attention to your body to know when stress is affected their health. Here are some ways to help manage stress:

  • Relax. loose is important. Everyone has their way of relaxing. Some of these ways are deep breathing, yoga, meditation and massage therapy. If you can not do these things, take a few minutes to sit down, listen to soothing music, or read a book.
  • Reserve time for yourself. Taking care of yourself is important. To not feel guilty, consider it an order from your doctor! No matter how busy you are, you can try to book at least 15 minutes per day in its program of activities to do something for herself, such as taking a bubble bath, go for a walk or call a friend on the phone.
  • Sleep. Sleeping is a great way to help both your body and your mind. If you do not get enough sleep, your stress can worsen. Nor can fight disease in the same way if you sleep poorly. If you get enough sleep, you can better address their problems and reduce your risk of getting sick. Try to get seven to nine hours every night.
  • Eat right. Try to get energy by eating fruits, vegetables and protein. Peanut butter, chicken salad or tuna are good sources of protein. Eat whole grains, such as bread and wheat crackers. Do not be fooled by the jolt of energy you feel when consuming caffeine or sugar, that energy will run out quickly.
  • Move. Believe it or not, physical activity not only helps relieve muscle tension, but also improves your mood!Before and after physical activity, the body produces certain chemicals called endorphins that relieve stress and improve your mood.
  • Talk to friends. Talk to your friends in order to better manage stress. Friends listen well. Does very well find someone who will let you talk freely about their problems and feelings without judgment. It also helps to hear a different point of view. His friends remember you are not alone.
  • Get professional help if needed. Talk to a therapist. A therapist can help you manage stress and find better ways to cope. Therapy can also help with more serious stress-related disorders such as PTSD. There are medications that can help relieve symptoms of depression and anxiety, and promote sleep.
  • Be transigente. Sometimes discuss not worth the stress it generates. Yield occasionally.
  • Write down what you think. Did you ever sent email to a friend about the terrible day that was, and felt better afterwards? Why not take a pen and paper and write down what is happening in your life? Keeping a journal can be a great way to vent and manage their problems. You can then re-read your journal and see how much progress has been made!
  • Help others. Helping someone can help themselves. Help your neighbor, or do volunteer work in your community.
  • Have a hobby. Find something you enjoy. Be sure to take the time to explore their interests.
  • Please limits. Regarding things like work and family, determine how much you can actually do. The amount of hours in the day is limited. Limit yourself to yourself and others too. Do not be afraid to say NO to requests for your time and energy.
  • Plan your time. Consider in advance how you will use your time. Write a list of things to do. Decide which are the most important.
  • Do not handle stress in ways that are not healthy. Among these are drinking too much alcohol, using drugs, smoking or overeating.

I heard deep breathing can help with my stress. How is it done?

Deep breathing is a good way to relax. Try to do it a few times per day. Here´s how you do it:

  1. Lie down or sit in a chair.
  2. Rest your hands on your stomach.
  3. Slowly count to four and inhale through the nose. Feel your stomach rise. Hold your breath for a second.
  4. Slowly count to four while you exhale through your mouth. To control how fast you exhale, purse your lips as if to whistle. Your stomach will slowly drop.
  5. Repeat for five to ten times.

Cause stress ulcers?

Doctors used to think ulcers were caused by stress and spicy foods. We now know that stress does not cause ulcers, only irritates. The ulcers are caused by a bacterium (germ) called H. pylori. Researchers do not yet know for certain how people contract. They think they can get it through the water. It is treated by a combination of antibiotics and other drugs.

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To protect students at career colleges from becoming burdened by student loan debt they cannot repay !

 These regulations will hold career training programs accountable for putting their students on the path to success, and they complement action across the Administration to protect consumers and prevent and investigate fraud, waste and abuse, particularly at for-profit colleges.

"Career colleges must be a stepping stone to the middle class. But too many hard-working students find themselves buried in debt with little to show for it. That is simply unacceptable," U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said. "These regulations are a necessary step to ensure that colleges accepting federal funds protect students, cut costs and improve outcomes. We will continue to take action as needed."

To qualify for federal student aid, the law requires that most for-profit programs and certificate programs at private non-profit and public institutions prepare students for "gainful employment in a recognized occupation." Under the regulations finalized today, a program would be considered to lead to gainful employment if the estimated annual loan payment of a typical graduate does not exceed 20 percent of his or her discretionary income or 8 percent of his or her total earnings. Programs that exceed these levels would be at risk of losing their ability to participate in taxpayer-funded federal student aid programs.

The final gainful employment regulations follow an extensive rulemaking process involving public hearings, negotiations and about 95,000 public comments. The regulations, which will go into effect on July 1, 2015, reflect the feedback the Department received, and aim to protect Americans from poor career training programs by targeting those programs that leave students buried in debt with few opportunities to repay it. Highlights of the rule include:

  • Preventing students from being buried in debt: Based on available data, the Department estimates that about 1,400 programs serving 840,000 students—of whom 99 percent are at for-profit institutions—would not pass the accountability standards. All programs will have the opportunity to make immediate changes that could help them avoid sanctions, but if these programs do not improve, they will ultimately become ineligible for federal student aid—which often makes up nearly 90 percent of the revenue at for-profit institutions.
  • More rigorous accountability than previous regulations: The new regulations are tougher than the Department's 2011 rules because they set a higher passing requirement and lay out a shorter path to ineligibility for the poorest-performing programs. In 2012, the Department estimated that 193 programs would not have passed the previous regulations; with respect to these new regulations, based on available data, the Department estimates that about 1,400 programs would not pass the accountability metric.
  • Providing transparency about student success: The rule also provides useful information for all students and consumers by requiring institutions to provide important information about their programs, like what their former students are earning, their success at graduating, and the amount of debt they accumulated.
  • Improving student outcomes: The regulations build on momentum toward increased accountability in higher education by setting standards for career training programs, including programs offered by for-profit institutions, to ensure they are serving students well. While the Department has seen encouraging changes in the past five years, it believes all career training programs can and should meet higher expectations.

Today, the Department is also taking new steps to formalize partnerships with several federal agencies to enhance cooperation and ensure proper oversight of for-profit institutions of higher education through an interagency task force.

Background on the Administration's efforts to protect students from poor-performing career colleges Too often, students at career colleges—including thousands of veterans—are charged excessive costs, but don't get the education they paid for. Instead, students in such programs are provided with poor quality training, often for low-wage jobs or in occupations where there are simply no job opportunities. They find themselves with large amounts of debt and, too often, end up in default. In many cases, students are drawn into these programs with confusing or misleading information.

The situation for students at for-profit institutions is particularly troubling. On average, attending a two-year for-profit institution costs a student four times as much as attending a community college. More than 80 percent of students at for-profits borrow, while less than half of students at public institutions do. Ultimately, students at for-profit colleges represent only about 11 percent of the total higher education population but 44 percent of all federal student loan defaults.

In response to these concerns, in 2009, the Department began extensive conversations with the higher education community about the role of career colleges, particularly on how they could be held accountable for the outcomes of their students. Following a 2012 court decision, which affirmed the U.S. Department of Education's authority to regulate in this area in order to protect students and taxpayers, the Department undertook new efforts to make sure career training programs provide affordable pathways to good jobs.

The Department believes many institutions have already started to take steps to improve. Some of the largest institutions have instituted trial periods for programs before students have to commit, so students can decide if that program is right for them. There are reports that institutions have decreased program lengths. Some are reducing costs. And a few institutions have closed some locations and programs they judge to be performing poorly.

But the Department also believes there is still potential for improvement in many of these programs—public, private non-profit and for-profit—so it is taking action to spur more change.

The gainful employment regulations are a central part of the Administration's work to ensure that student debt is affordable and that for-profit colleges serve students well. These regulations complement other efforts taken by the Administration to protect students by addressing problems at poor performing institutions, particularly in the for-profit sector. These efforts include:

  • Formalizing an interagency oversight task force The Department will lead an effort to formalize an interagency task force to help ensure proper oversight of for-profit institutions of higher education. In particular, the Department and other federal and state agencies will coordinate their activities and promote information sharing to protect students from unfair, deceptive, and abusive policies and practices. The task force will build on efforts already underway among various federal agencies, and include the Departments of Justice, Treasury and Veterans Affairs, as well as the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, Federal Trade Commission, and the Securities and Exchange Commission. In addition, state attorneys general will also be invited to continue their participation in this collaboration. Given the important responsibilities each of these federal agencies has, and the vital role that states play, the agencies will leverage their resources and expertise to assist one another, thereby making the best use of scarce resources and better protecting the interests of students and taxpayers. This task force will formalize and strengthen a working group that has been working together over the past year and that has coordinated efforts in several reviews and investigatory work. The task force will meet as needed, but at least once each quarter.

  • Keeping student debt affordable The Department is helping more students manage their student debt through flexible repayment options like the Pay As You Earn plan, which caps student loan payments at 10 percent of a borrower's discretionary income. In addition, the Administration continues targeted outreach to help borrowers who may be struggling to repay their loans, ensuring that they have the information they need to select the best repayment option for them and avoid future default.

  • Developing a college ratings system The Department is also working on a new college ratings system, which will showcase colleges and universities that are effective in improving student success; incentivize institutions to work toward the most important goals, like graduating low-income students and holding down costs; and help students and families choose their school based on the value it provides for their investment.

  • Strengthening oversight of the programs on which our nation's service members and veterans rely Through Executive Order 13607, the Principles of Excellence for Educational Institutions Serving Service Members, Veterans, Spouses, and Other Family Members, the Administration has worked to protect our nation's military families by ensuring that federal military and veterans educational benefits programs are providing service members, veterans, spouses, and other family members with the information, support, and protections they deserve. This includes: establishing a centralized complaint system; new, risk-based program reviews informed by students complaints to focus enforcement efforts at the Departments of Veterans Affairs, Defense, Education and Justice, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, and the Federal Trade Commission; and key tools and resources like the online GI Bill ® Comparison Tool, which has made it easier for over 450,000 veterans, service members and their dependents to select education and training programs that provide a good value and meet their needs.




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