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In Dixon: THE SMOKEHOUSE BAND at VET HALL Nov 25th at 7p


On this upcoming Tuesday, November 25 is an event at the Dixon Vets Hall, 1305 N. 1st Street in Dixon. The Smokehouse Band will be performing at 7 pm. There is a $5 charge at the door. Smokehouse band has played at the hall back in July. They play country ...

Would-be Dixon studio exec is due in federal court – but will she show?


Carpenter’s efforts in Dixon died after The Bee’s revelations, but the indictment indicates that she continued to raise money, and The Bee has been told her latest pitch involved a Southern California project. The FBI and the Internal Revenue Service ...

Tight end Bryce Dixon's status for UCLA game remains uncertain


Dixon, a freshman, was suspended for last Thursday’s game against California. Coach Steve Sarkisian said after the game that Dixon did not play because of an unspecified “student conduct issue.” Dixon was not made available to reporters after Tuesday ...

Letter: Lessons for Dixon in studio scam


A the author of a book (now looking for a publisher) covering her episode in Dixon, the questions most often posed to me have been: "Where is she now?" and "Has she been arrested?" Now I can say, "She was arrested in southern California – and with 32 ...

USC tight end Bryce Dixon suspended for non-academic incident


Dixon did not suit up for Thursday’s game against California and Trojans coach Steve Sarkisian said he was not sure when Dixon might be reinstated. “Hopefully we’ll have something soon for you guys, but nothing yet,” Sarkisian said Friday.



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Nobody who starts smoking in adolescence expect your teeth will begin to fall when you are 40

No person who starts smoking in adolescence expect your teeth will begin to fall when you are 40.But that´s exactly what happened to Felicita and Brett, two people in real life who tell their stories in the CDC´s tips of quitters ( Advice ). The new high-impact ads will be broadcast throughout the United States as of July 7, 2014. Advertisements encourage smokers to stop smoking and to call 1-800-QUIT-NOW (1-800-784 -8669) or 1-855-DÉJELO-YA (1-855-335-3569) if you want free help. Smoking causes immediate and long-term damage to the body. Former smokers who are in the campaign share very personal stories about their own suffering to motivate smokers to quit. Seven people from different parts of the country are in the most recent campaign Advice .

Smoking destroys the smile

It is known that cigarette smoking causes yellow teeth are made, but for many it is a surprise that can cause tooth loss. The explanation is gum disease (periodontal disease), an infection of the gums and bone structure supporting the teeth. In severe cases, gum disease can make your teeth fall out.If you smoke:
  • Is twice as likely to have gum disease than non-smoking person.
  • The more cigarettes smoked, the greater your risk of gum disease.
  • The longer you smoke, the greater your risk of gum disease.
Notice of Felicita and Brett
Felicita and Brett, two new campaigners advice , learned the hard way that smoking can ruin your teeth. Felicita started smoking at age 12 and continued to do so for many more, but did not realize that smoking worsens their dental problems. Like many people with gum disease, did not feel much pain as gums worse. At age 50, Felicita was the dentist to have a tooth taken out and could not believe it when he learned that they had to get everyone. Currently, Felicita loves not being a smoker, but I do not smile much because ashamed to have dentures. The campaign ads Advice Felicita tell the story in English and Spanish.
The history of Felicita
Brettstarted smoking at 16 to impress a girl. When I was about 35, Brett gave him gum disease and when he turned 42, and he had to take almost all teeth, including 16 in a single operation. After several attempts, Brett finally managed to quit smoking. Now know you can not smoke or even a puff that could fall. "My wake up call was lost most of my teeth," he says. Now Brett is 4 years without smoking. Stay away from cigarettes and have good dental habits are important to help prevent gum disease.This means brushing your teeth, use floss or dental floss to remove tartar and go to the dentist regularly for checkups and to make professional cleanings.

Smoking, pregnancy and babies

Smoking during pregnancy can cause serious health problems for the mother and baby. The baby may be born much too soon, have a birth defect or dying from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Even being around smoke a cigarette can cause health problems for the mother and baby. Amanda started smoking when I was in fifth grade and when was 13 and smoked every day, even outside during the harsh Wisconsin winters. While in college, newly-engaged to be married and still smoking a pack-daily, Amanda learned she was pregnant. His daughter was born 2 months premature. The tiny baby spent weeks in a hospital incubator. "Cancer. I do not give."
Announcement Rose
Rose grew up in a small town in Texas and started smoking at age 13. After a while, I had an addiction to two packs a day and almost lost a foot due to blockage of blood vessels. Before Rose could leg surgery at an X-ray showed he had lung cancer, which then spread to the brain. After two operations, Rose is in close contact with their oncologists. "I regret having started smoking in the first place," says Rose. Shawn lives in Washington state and began smoking at age 14 to try to be accepted by the other students in a new school. I was about 45 when a chronic cough and laryngitis ended up being throat cancer. He endured 38 radiation treatments and finally quit smoking, but doctors could not save his larynx. You now have a stoma (hole) that lets you breathe and laryngeal implant that allows you to talk. Terrie lived in North Carolina and started smoking in high school. At age 40, he was diagnosed with mouth and throat cancer, and they removed the larynx. Terrie fought cancer bravely until he died at age 53 in the fall of 2013. She shares a powerful message in a new ad that was recorded days before he died. More than anything, Terrie wanted help motivate smokers to quit, and could avoid the pain and suffering she passed by.

Smoking and HIV

If you have HIV, the virus that can cause AIDS, smoking is especially dangerous to your health. If you smoke:
  • You are more likely to be affected by the harmful consequences of smoking than people who do not have HIV. These diseases include cancer, heart disease or stroke.
  • You are more likely to have HIV-related infections that people who have HIV and do not smoke.These diseases include oral candidiasis (an infection in the mouth) and Pneumocystispneumonia , a dangerous infection of the lungs.
Brian was in good health, worked in California and had it under control HIV when her life changed drastically. Cigarette smoking combined with HIV, made ??her some obstruct blood vessels. At 43, he had a blood clot in the lungs, stroke, and he had surgery on a neck artery. "I had to have a stroke to quit smoking," says Brian. For months after the stroke, Brian struggled to speak and read. I could not work or even dress. Today, his right hand is still weak so you can no longer work as a waiter or give pottery classes.

Resources for quitting

People who quit smoking can significantly reduce your risk of illness or premature death. The younger of quitting smoking, the more likely you are to avoid health problems. The following resources can help you quit smoking:
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To protect students at career colleges from becoming burdened by student loan debt they cannot repay !

 These regulations will hold career training programs accountable for putting their students on the path to success, and they complement action across the Administration to protect consumers and prevent and investigate fraud, waste and abuse, particularly at for-profit colleges.

"Career colleges must be a stepping stone to the middle class. But too many hard-working students find themselves buried in debt with little to show for it. That is simply unacceptable," U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said. "These regulations are a necessary step to ensure that colleges accepting federal funds protect students, cut costs and improve outcomes. We will continue to take action as needed."

To qualify for federal student aid, the law requires that most for-profit programs and certificate programs at private non-profit and public institutions prepare students for "gainful employment in a recognized occupation." Under the regulations finalized today, a program would be considered to lead to gainful employment if the estimated annual loan payment of a typical graduate does not exceed 20 percent of his or her discretionary income or 8 percent of his or her total earnings. Programs that exceed these levels would be at risk of losing their ability to participate in taxpayer-funded federal student aid programs.

The final gainful employment regulations follow an extensive rulemaking process involving public hearings, negotiations and about 95,000 public comments. The regulations, which will go into effect on July 1, 2015, reflect the feedback the Department received, and aim to protect Americans from poor career training programs by targeting those programs that leave students buried in debt with few opportunities to repay it. Highlights of the rule include:

  • Preventing students from being buried in debt: Based on available data, the Department estimates that about 1,400 programs serving 840,000 students—of whom 99 percent are at for-profit institutions—would not pass the accountability standards. All programs will have the opportunity to make immediate changes that could help them avoid sanctions, but if these programs do not improve, they will ultimately become ineligible for federal student aid—which often makes up nearly 90 percent of the revenue at for-profit institutions.
  • More rigorous accountability than previous regulations: The new regulations are tougher than the Department's 2011 rules because they set a higher passing requirement and lay out a shorter path to ineligibility for the poorest-performing programs. In 2012, the Department estimated that 193 programs would not have passed the previous regulations; with respect to these new regulations, based on available data, the Department estimates that about 1,400 programs would not pass the accountability metric.
  • Providing transparency about student success: The rule also provides useful information for all students and consumers by requiring institutions to provide important information about their programs, like what their former students are earning, their success at graduating, and the amount of debt they accumulated.
  • Improving student outcomes: The regulations build on momentum toward increased accountability in higher education by setting standards for career training programs, including programs offered by for-profit institutions, to ensure they are serving students well. While the Department has seen encouraging changes in the past five years, it believes all career training programs can and should meet higher expectations.

Today, the Department is also taking new steps to formalize partnerships with several federal agencies to enhance cooperation and ensure proper oversight of for-profit institutions of higher education through an interagency task force.

Background on the Administration's efforts to protect students from poor-performing career colleges Too often, students at career colleges—including thousands of veterans—are charged excessive costs, but don't get the education they paid for. Instead, students in such programs are provided with poor quality training, often for low-wage jobs or in occupations where there are simply no job opportunities. They find themselves with large amounts of debt and, too often, end up in default. In many cases, students are drawn into these programs with confusing or misleading information.

The situation for students at for-profit institutions is particularly troubling. On average, attending a two-year for-profit institution costs a student four times as much as attending a community college. More than 80 percent of students at for-profits borrow, while less than half of students at public institutions do. Ultimately, students at for-profit colleges represent only about 11 percent of the total higher education population but 44 percent of all federal student loan defaults.

In response to these concerns, in 2009, the Department began extensive conversations with the higher education community about the role of career colleges, particularly on how they could be held accountable for the outcomes of their students. Following a 2012 court decision, which affirmed the U.S. Department of Education's authority to regulate in this area in order to protect students and taxpayers, the Department undertook new efforts to make sure career training programs provide affordable pathways to good jobs.

The Department believes many institutions have already started to take steps to improve. Some of the largest institutions have instituted trial periods for programs before students have to commit, so students can decide if that program is right for them. There are reports that institutions have decreased program lengths. Some are reducing costs. And a few institutions have closed some locations and programs they judge to be performing poorly.

But the Department also believes there is still potential for improvement in many of these programs—public, private non-profit and for-profit—so it is taking action to spur more change.

The gainful employment regulations are a central part of the Administration's work to ensure that student debt is affordable and that for-profit colleges serve students well. These regulations complement other efforts taken by the Administration to protect students by addressing problems at poor performing institutions, particularly in the for-profit sector. These efforts include:

  • Formalizing an interagency oversight task force The Department will lead an effort to formalize an interagency task force to help ensure proper oversight of for-profit institutions of higher education. In particular, the Department and other federal and state agencies will coordinate their activities and promote information sharing to protect students from unfair, deceptive, and abusive policies and practices. The task force will build on efforts already underway among various federal agencies, and include the Departments of Justice, Treasury and Veterans Affairs, as well as the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, Federal Trade Commission, and the Securities and Exchange Commission. In addition, state attorneys general will also be invited to continue their participation in this collaboration. Given the important responsibilities each of these federal agencies has, and the vital role that states play, the agencies will leverage their resources and expertise to assist one another, thereby making the best use of scarce resources and better protecting the interests of students and taxpayers. This task force will formalize and strengthen a working group that has been working together over the past year and that has coordinated efforts in several reviews and investigatory work. The task force will meet as needed, but at least once each quarter.

  • Keeping student debt affordable The Department is helping more students manage their student debt through flexible repayment options like the Pay As You Earn plan, which caps student loan payments at 10 percent of a borrower's discretionary income. In addition, the Administration continues targeted outreach to help borrowers who may be struggling to repay their loans, ensuring that they have the information they need to select the best repayment option for them and avoid future default.

  • Developing a college ratings system The Department is also working on a new college ratings system, which will showcase colleges and universities that are effective in improving student success; incentivize institutions to work toward the most important goals, like graduating low-income students and holding down costs; and help students and families choose their school based on the value it provides for their investment.

  • Strengthening oversight of the programs on which our nation's service members and veterans rely Through Executive Order 13607, the Principles of Excellence for Educational Institutions Serving Service Members, Veterans, Spouses, and Other Family Members, the Administration has worked to protect our nation's military families by ensuring that federal military and veterans educational benefits programs are providing service members, veterans, spouses, and other family members with the information, support, and protections they deserve. This includes: establishing a centralized complaint system; new, risk-based program reviews informed by students complaints to focus enforcement efforts at the Departments of Veterans Affairs, Defense, Education and Justice, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, and the Federal Trade Commission; and key tools and resources like the online GI Bill ® Comparison Tool, which has made it easier for over 450,000 veterans, service members and their dependents to select education and training programs that provide a good value and meet their needs.




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