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Strong dollar no friend of Hoosier steel plants


EAST CHICAGO – Indiana’s steel industry, which many hoped would be on the upswing after the end of the Great Recession, is struggling under the weight of cheap oil, a strong dollar and low prices, leading to hundreds of layoffs in just one week and ...

Express train service planned between South Bend and Chicago


"It's what people want and it's what the strategic plan can deliver." The express train will make only two stops in Indiana, at the Dune Park stop in Chesterton and East Chicago. Travel time from Dune Park will be cut to less than an hour, compared to the ...

Alleged East Chicago gang member's murder trial set to begin


The trial of an alleged gang member charged with killing six people in East Chicago man is about to begin after a prolonged jury selection process necessary because federal prosecutors plan to seek the death penalty. The Post-Tribune reports (http://trib ...

Indiana steel industry missing out on boom cycle as cuts mount


EAST CHICAGO, Ind. (AP) — Indiana's steel industry, which many hoped would be on the upswing after the end of the Great Recession, is struggling under the weight of cheap oil, a strong dollar and low prices, leading to hundreds of layoffs in just one ...

Strong dollar, cheap oil leave Indiana steel industry with deep cuts, no boom cycle


EAST CHICAGO, Indiana — Indiana's steel industry has seen nearly 700 jobs vanish recently as cheap oil, a strong dollar and other factors create an uncertain future. Industry analyst Charles Bradford tells The Times in Munster (http://bit.ly/1uSmpCd ...

BC-IN--Indiana Daybook, IN


11 a.m. EST. Lutheran Hospital, 7952 W. Jeffersonville Blvd. Contact: Kara Brooks, kbrooks@gov.in.gov. EAST CHICAGO - Indiana Health Commissioner Jerome Adams discusses infant mortality, smoking, obesity and HIP 2.0. 11:30 a.m. CST. Ameristar Casino Hotel ...

Clarksville 2nd 'most dangerous' in Indiana


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town of Clarksville is listed as second in the "10 Most Dangerous Places in Indiana," nearly eclipsing the top-ranked Chicago suburb Gary and ranking above Indianapolis, East Chicago and South Bend, according to an analysis by the Movoto Real Estate blog.

Chicago Auto Show 2015 directions, parking and transit information


FROM INDIANA Via the SKYWAY: Take the Indiana Tollway, I-90 West, to the Chicago Skyway, to the local traffic lanes ...
FROM the NORTH, NORTHWEST or O'HARE AIRPORT: Take the Edens Expressway, I-94, East to the Kennedy Expressway, I-90, East to the Dan ...

Black lawmakers seek big changes for Indiana


INDIANAPOLIS | The Indiana Black Legislative Caucus is pushing an agenda at the Statehouse this year they claim would transform the state by improving the lives of all Hoosiers. State Sen. Lonnie Randolph, D-East Chicago, the group's chairman, said Indiana ...

US Steel to lay off more than 350 at Indiana tin mill


EAST CHICAGO, Ind. (AP) -- U.S. Steel says it will lay off more than 350 workers in East Chicago, Indiana, as it plans to temporarily close its tin mill. Company spokeswoman Sarah Cassella tells The Times in Munster that layoffs will begin in mid-March.




SPECIAL INFORMATION FOR EAST CHICAGO

Exercise at any age is vital for healthy bones and is essential for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.

Exercise not only improves bone health, it also increases muscle strength, coordination and balance and helps improve overall health.

Why do you exercise?

Bones, like muscles, are living tissue that responds to exercise by becoming stronger. In general, women and young men who exercise regularly reach a higher bone density (the highest level of consistency and strength of bones) than those who do not exercise. Most people reach peak bone density between 20 and 30 years old. From that age usually bone density begins to decrease. Women and men over age 20 can help prevent bone loss hacienda exercise frequently. The exercise allows us to maintain muscle strength, coordination and balance, which in turn helps prevent falls and fractures. This is especially important for older adults and people who have been diagnosed with osteoporosis.

The best exercise to strengthen bones

The best exercise for your bones is required weight-bearing. This type of exercise makes you strive to work against gravity. Examples of these exercises include weight lifting, walking, hiking, jogging, stair climbing, tennis and dance. In contrast, exercises that do not require weight-bearing include swimming and cycling. While these exercises help strengthen and maintain strong muscles and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, are not the most effective in strengthening bones.

Exercise Tips

If you have health problems such as heart problems, high blood pressure, diabetes or obesity, or if you are 40 years old or more, consult your doctor before you start exercising regularly. According to the Surgeon General, the optimal goal is to exercise for at least 30 minutes most days; preferably daily.

Pay attention to your body. When starting an exercise routine, you may have some pain and discomfort in the muscles, but should not be painful or last more than 48 hours. If this occurs, you may be working too hard and need to slow down. Stop exercising if you feel any pain or discomfort in the chest and talk to your doctor before your next workout.

If you have osteoporosis, it is important to ask your doctor what activities are safe for you. If you have low bone density, experts recommend that the column is protected and avoiding exercises or activities that cause bending or twisting of the back. Moreover, should avoid high-impact exercise to reduce the risk of breaking a bone. You can also consult with an exercise specialist to teach you the proper progression of their activities, to stretch and strengthen muscles safely, and correct bad posture habits. An exercise specialist should have a degree in exercise physiology, physical education, physiotherapy or similar specialty. Be sure to ask if you are familiar with the special needs of people with osteoporosis.

A comprehensive system to combat osteoporosis

Remember, exercise is only part of a regimen for the prevention or treatment of osteoporosis. Like a diet rich in calcium and vitamin D, exercise helps strengthen bones at any age. But it is possible that good nutrition and exercise are not enough to stop the loss of bone density caused by medical conditions, menopause or certain habits such as the use of snuff and excessive consumption of alcohol. It is important to talk to your doctor about your bone health. Ask if you are a candidate for a bone density test. If densitometry shows low bone mass, ask what medications may help maintain healthy bones and fight osteoporosis. [16]



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Aids to study in EAST CHICAGO

Financial aid is available from a variety of sources for college, career school, graduate school, and professional school.

 Financial aid is money to help pay for college or career school. Aid can come from

Besides financial aid, you also should think about what you can do to lower your costs when you go to college.

“Types of Federal Student Aid” Video

Check out this video to learn about grants, loans, and work-study jobs and how they can help fund your education. (Captioning available in English and Spanish; just start the video and click on the CC symbol at the bottom.)

View accessible version (wmv)


Aid and Other Resources From the Federal Government

The federal government offers a number of financial aid programs. Besides aid from the U.S. Department of Education (discussed below), you also might get

The U.S. Department of Education awards about $150 billion a year in grants, work-study funds, and low-interestloans to more than 15 million students. Federal student aid covers such expenses as tuition and fees, room and board, books and supplies, and transportation. Aid also can help pay for other related expenses, such as a computer and dependent care. Thousands of schools across the country participate in the federal student aid programs; ask the schools you’re interested in whether they do!

Federal student aid includes:

  • Grants—financial aid that doesn’t have to be repaid (unless, for example, you withdraw from school and owe a refund)
  • Loans— borrowed money for college or career school; you must repay your loans, with interest
  • Work-Study—a work program through which you earn money to help you pay for school

Use FAFSA4caster to get an estimate of how much aid you might receive from the U.S. Department of Education.

Apply for federal student aid using the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA®). And remember, the first F in “FAFSA” stands for “free”—you shouldn’t pay to fill out the FAFSA!

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Aid From Your State Government

Even if you´re not eligible for federal aid, you might be eligible for financial aid from your state. Contact your state grant agency for more information.

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Aid From Your College or Career School

Many colleges offer financial aid from their own funds. Find out what might be available to you:

  • Visit your school’s financial aid page on its website, or ask someone in the financial aid office.
  • Ask at the department that offers your course of study; they might have a scholarship for students in your major.
  • Fill out any applications the school requires for its own aid, and meet the deadlines.

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Aid From a Nonprofit or Private Organization

Many organizations offer scholarships or grants to help students pay for college. This free money can make a real difference in how affordable your education is.

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Make Your Health Benefits Work for You in EAST CHICAGO

The Department of Labor´s Employee Benefits Security Administration (EBSA) administers several important health benefit laws covering employer-based health plans. They govern your basic rights to information about how your health plan works, how to qualify for benefits, and how to make claims for benefits.

In addition, there are specific laws protecting your right to health benefits when you lose coverage or change jobs. EBSA also oversees health care laws covering special medical conditions. For more information on the laws that protect your benefits, see EBSA´s Website. Or call the agency toll free at 1-866-444-3272 to reach a regional office near you. These 10 tips can help make your health benefits work better for you.

1. Explore Your Options for Health Coverage

You have options for health coverage. There are many different types of health benefit plans. Find out what your employer offers, then check out the plan (or plans). Your employer´s human resource office, the health plan administrator, or your union can provide information to help you match your needs and preferences with the available plans. Or consider a health plan through the Health Insurance Marketplace. Visit HealthCare.gov to see the health plan options available in your area. Get information about all of your options and review it. The more information you have, the better your health care decisions will be.

2. Review the Benefits Available

Do the plans offered cover the benefits that are important to you, such as mental health services, well-baby care, vision or dental care? Are there deductibles? What are the out-of-pocket expenses you may face? Determine your needs and priorities. Compare all of your options before you decide which coverage to elect. Matching your needs and those of your family members will result in the best possible benefits. Cheapest may not always be best. Your goal is high quality health benefits.

3. Read Your Plan´s Summary Plan Description (SPD) for the Wealth of Information It Provides

Your health plan administrator should provide a copy. It outlines your benefits and your legal rights under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA), the Federal law that protects your health benefits. It also should contain information about the coverage of dependents, what services will require a co-payment or coinsurance, and the circumstances under which your employer can change or terminate a health benefits plan. You also can find many of the answers to your questions in the Summary of Benefits and Coverage (SBC), a short, easy-to-understand summary of what a plan covers and what it costs. You should receive a copy with your enrollment materials. Save the SPD, the SBC, and all other health plan brochures and documents, along with memos or correspondence from your employer relating to health benefits.

4. Use Your Health Coverage

Once your health coverage has started, use it to help cover medical costs for services like going to the doctor, filling prescriptions or getting emergency care. Using your benefits will help you and your family stay healthy and reduce your health care costs. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) provides many valuable protections for people enrolled in employment-based health plans including prohibiting preexisting condition exclusions and annual and lifetime limits on essential health benefits. What’s more, many plans cover certain preventive services for free, including routine vaccinations, regular well-baby and well-child visits, blood pressure, diabetes and cholesterol tests, and many cancer screenings. You also can keep your children on your health plan until age 26. Take advantage of your benefits, especially free preventive care if your plan covers it. If you were required to pay cost-sharing for a preventive service, check your Explanation of Benefits and ensure that the provider billed the service properly.

5. Understand Your Plan’s Mental Health and Substance Use Coverage

Many health plans provide coverage for mental health and substance use disorder benefits. If a plan does offer these benefits, the financial requirements (such as co-payments and deductibles) and the quantitative treatment limits (such as visit limits) for the mental health and substance use disorder benefits cannot be more restrictive than the financial requirements or treatment limits applied to medical/surgical benefits. Plans also cannot impose lifetime and annual limits on the dollar amount of mental health and substance use disorder services, including behavioral health treatment. Some plans cover preventive services like screenings for depression and child behavioral assessments for free. Check your SPD and SBC to find out what your plan covers.

6. Look For Wellness Programs

More employers are establishing wellness programs that encourage employees to work out, stop smoking, and generally adopt healthier lifestyles. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and the ACA encourage group health plans to adopt wellness programs but also includes protections for employees and dependents from impermissible discrimination based on a health factor. These programs often provide rewards such as cost savings as well as promoting good health. Check your SPD and SBC to see whether your plan offers a wellness program(s). If your plan does, find out what reward is offered and what you need to do to receive it.

7. Know How to File an Appeal if Your Health Benefits Claim is Denied

Understand your plan’s procedures for filing a claim for benefits and where to make appeals of the plan´s decisions. Pay attention to time limits – make sure you timely file claims and appeals and that the plan makes decisions on time. Keep records and copies of correspondence. Check your health benefits package and your SPD to determine who is responsible for handling problems with benefit claims. Contact EBSA for assistance if you are unable to obtain a response to your complaint.

8. Assess Your Benefits Coverage as Your Family Status Changes

Marriage, Porce, childbirth or adoption, the death of a spouse, and aging out of a parent’s health plan are life events that may signal a need to change your health benefits. You, your spouse, and your dependent children may be eligible for special enrollment into other employer health coverage or through the Health Insurance Marketplace. Even without life-changing events, the information provided by your employer should tell you how you can change benefits or switch plans. If you’re considering special enrollment, act quickly. You have 30 days after the life event to request special enrollment in other employer coverage or 60 days to select a plan in the Marketplace.

9. Be Aware that Changing Jobs and Other Work Events Can Affect Your Health Benefits

If you change employers or lose your job, you may need to find other health coverage. If you have a new job, consider enrolling in your new employer’s plan. Whether starting or losing a job, you may be eligible to special enroll in a spouse’s employer-sponsored plan or through the Health Insurance Marketplace. Under the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act – better known as COBRA – you, your covered spouse, and your dependent children may be eligible to continue coverage under your former employer-sponsored plan. This coverage is temporary (generally 18 to 36 months) and you may have to pay the entire premium plus a 2 percent administrative charge. Get information on your coverage options and compare. Be aware of the deadlines for deciding on coverage and find out when your new coverage will be effective.

10. Plan For Retirement

Before you retire, find out what health benefits, if any, extend to you and your spouse during your retirement years. Consult with your employer´s human resources office, your union, or the plan administrator. Check your SPD and other plan documents. Make sure there is no conflicting information among these sources about the benefits you will receive or the circumstances under which they can change or be eliminated. With this information in hand, you can make other important choices, like finding out if you are eligible for Medicare and Medigap insurance coverage. If you want to retire before you are eligible for Medicare and your employer does not provide health benefits in retirement, consider what you will do for health coverage. Your options may include enrolling in a spouse’s employer plan or in a Marketplace plan or temporarily continuing your employer coverage by electing COBRA. Planning for retirement includes planning for your health coverage in retirement. To find out more, read Taking the Mystery Out of Retirement Planning.

These Laws Can Help

  • The Employee Retirement Income Security Act – Offers protection for inPiduals enrolled in retirement, health, and other benefit plans sponsored by private-sector employers, and provides rights to information and a claims and appeals process for participants to get benefits from their plans.
  • The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act – Creates the Health Insurance Marketplace and provides protections for employment-based health coverage, including extending dependent coverage of children to age 26; prohibiting preexisting condition exclusions and prohibiting lifetime and annual limits on essential health benefits.
  • The Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act – Contains provisions giving certain former employees, retirees, spouses, and dependent children the right to purchase temporary continuation of group health plan coverage at group rates in specific instances.
  • The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act – Allows employees, their spouses and their dependents to enroll in employer-provided health coverage regardless of open enrollment periods if they lose coverage or in the event of marriage, birth, adoption or placement for adoption. Also prohibits discrimination in health care coverage.
  • The Women´s Health and Cancer Rights Act – Offers protections for breast cancer patients who elect breast reconstruction in connection with a mastectomy.
  • The Newborns´ and Mothers´ Health Protection Act – Provides rules on minimum coverage for hospital lengths of stay following childbirth.
  • The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act – Prohibits discrimination in group health plan premiums based on genetic information. Also, generally prohibits group health plans from requesting genetic information or requiring genetic tests.
  • The Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act and the Mental Health Parity Act – Requires parity in financial requirements and treatment limitations for mental health and substance use benefits with those for medical and surgical benefits.
  • The Children´s Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act – Allows special enrollment in a group health plan if an employee or dependents lose coverage under CHIP or Medicaid or are eligible for premium assistance under those programs.

For More Information

Visit the Employee Benefits Security Administration’s Website to view the following publications. To order copies or to request assistance from a benefits advisor, contact EBSA electronically or call toll free 1-866-444-3272.

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