ELDRIDGE ALABAMA NEWS AND BLOG


Latest News - ELDRIDGE ALABAMA

Baylor fends off New Mexico State, 66-55


WACO — Johnathan Motley scored 16 points, and Al Freeman and Lester Medford added 10 each to lead ...
New Mexico State opened the second half strong, hitting back-to-back 3s from Barry and DK Eldridge, and a dunk by Johnathon Wilkins to pull the Aggies ...

Stephen Eldridge: Don't fall for FairTax claims


Dear Editor: Despite Al Ose's claim that the FairTax eliminates hidden taxes, in truth it hides several significant taxes. Under the FairTax (which is different from the flat tax), all new goods and services for personal consumption would be taxed at the ...

US diplomat pledges support to Saudi Gazette


ALKHOBAR — US Consul General in Dhahran Mike Hankey called on Saudi Gazette Editor-in-Chief Somayya Jabarti at her hotel in Al-Khobar last week and discussed ...
Noor and Public Affairs Officer Donya S. Eldridge. During the discussion, topics of mutual ...

‘All roads lead to Eldridge’ during annual toy run


The Eldridge Free Will Baptist Children’s Home, which is located in Eldridge just off U.S. Highway 78 and Alabama Highway 13 in northwest Alabama, has been in operation since 1948 and operates solely on donations it receives from area churches ...

The Selma Times‑Journal


Mrs. Carolyn Eldridge Marshall and Mrs. Freddie Mae Eldridge Craig, all of Selma, Alabama; two brothers, Mr. James “Bossman” Richardson of Selma, Alabama and Mr. Ned Richardson of Bronx, New York; four sisters, Mrs. Sarah Lee Barnes, Mrs. Sarah Pearl ...

Spirit of Alabama: Eldridge Knighton


Tonight, a story of survival. A working man robbed, shot, left for dead. His survival is like a miracle, his story of forgiveness is more than I could have imagined. His name is Eldridge Knighton. He was a cab driver just doing his job. Little did he know ...

Eldridge man dies in one-vehicle accident on U.S. 78 in Walker County


according to Alabama State Troopers. Kevin Nathaniel Norris, 32, of Eldridge, died in the wreck, according to the report. Norris was driving a 1994 Chevrolet Cavalier. There were no other injuries. The accident, which happened about 1:20 a.m., is under ...

Alabama Football: Recruits Tide Must Land After Missing on Eldridge Massington


For as big of a win as it is for UCLA though, Massington's decision will undoubtedly go down as a rare recruiting loss for Nick Saban and the Alabama Crimson Tide. Alabama was in Massington's final two, so it's the program that lost out on the 4-star receiver.

Former USC commit Eldridge Massington showing interest in Alabama


Alabama is battling with Southern California for the top spot in most major recruiting rankings and the Tide could take a big step in that battle with the recent decommitment of former USC pledge Eldridge Massington. The Mesquite, Texas wide receiver is a ...

Eldridge Massington's Stock Exploding, Alabama Offer Latest


One of the fastest receivers for his size in the country, West Mesquite (TX) wideout Eldridge Massington has seen his offer list grow rapidly this spring, including a major offer on Wednesday morning. In an extraordinarily deep class at wide receiver in ...



SPECIAL INFORMATION FOR ELDRIDGE

Capital to small businesses and entrepreneurs in ELDRIDGE

The U.S. Treasury Department’s State Small Business Credit Initiative (SSBCI) today released a new Quarterly Report detailing how the program continues to help small businesses grow and create jobs. Since the beginning of the program, the Treasury Department has disbursed more than $1.1 billion to participating states.

“Through the State Small Business Credit Initiative, the Treasury Department, states, and private sector lenders and investors are supporting small businesses and creating a lasting impact on the economy,” said Clifton Kellogg, Director of the SSBCI program. “More than $1 billion in State Small Business Credit Initiative funds have been distributed, making a real difference at the local level. Because of these funds, businesses have been able to buy new equipment, expand their facilities, and hire workers.”

Small businesses and entrepreneurs need capital to build their businesses, and SSBCI is designed to help spur new private sector lending or investment in small companies by leveraging private capital along with the federal support offered by the program. Through SSBCI, the Treasury Department will award nearly $1.5 billion to state programs across the country that support small businesses, including small manufacturers. SSBCI funding is not repaid by participating states to the federal government. Instead, to help even more small businesses, repaid loans and investments remain with participating states to be redeployed locally. The SSBCI Quarterly Report shows that as of September 2014, participating states have recycled more than $60 million to support additional investments.

States have made considerable progress in deploying these funds to support economic growth locally. The states that have deployed the most SSBCI funds by percentage of allocation include: North Dakota (Mandan Consortium), Idaho, Arkansas, Colorado, Montana, South Carolina, New Hampshire, Michigan, Kansas, and Alabama. The states that have deployed the most SSBCI funds by dollar amount include: California, Michigan, Florida, Illinois, Alabama, North Carolina, Texas, New York, Ohio, and Georgia.

SSBCI was created when President Obama signed into law the Small Business Jobs Act on September 27, 2010. The Treasury Department awarded allocations to all fifty states by early 2012, based on a formula set by the Small Business Jobs Act that considered population and unemployment levels. Each state designs its own small business programs, and five types of programs are eligible for SSBCI funds: Capital Access Programs, Loan Guarantee Programs, Loan Participation Programs, Collateral Support Programs, and Venture Capital Programs. In the SSBCI 2013 Annual Report business owners reported that more than 95,000 jobs will be created or saved as a direct result of SSBCI support. [23]







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To protect students at career colleges from becoming burdened by student loan debt they cannot repay !

 These regulations will hold career training programs accountable for putting their students on the path to success, and they complement action across the Administration to protect consumers and prevent and investigate fraud, waste and abuse, particularly at for-profit colleges.

"Career colleges must be a stepping stone to the middle class. But too many hard-working students find themselves buried in debt with little to show for it. That is simply unacceptable," U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said. "These regulations are a necessary step to ensure that colleges accepting federal funds protect students, cut costs and improve outcomes. We will continue to take action as needed."

To qualify for federal student aid, the law requires that most for-profit programs and certificate programs at private non-profit and public institutions prepare students for "gainful employment in a recognized occupation." Under the regulations finalized today, a program would be considered to lead to gainful employment if the estimated annual loan payment of a typical graduate does not exceed 20 percent of his or her discretionary income or 8 percent of his or her total earnings. Programs that exceed these levels would be at risk of losing their ability to participate in taxpayer-funded federal student aid programs.

The final gainful employment regulations follow an extensive rulemaking process involving public hearings, negotiations and about 95,000 public comments. The regulations, which will go into effect on July 1, 2015, reflect the feedback the Department received, and aim to protect Americans from poor career training programs by targeting those programs that leave students buried in debt with few opportunities to repay it. Highlights of the rule include:

  • Preventing students from being buried in debt: Based on available data, the Department estimates that about 1,400 programs serving 840,000 students—of whom 99 percent are at for-profit institutions—would not pass the accountability standards. All programs will have the opportunity to make immediate changes that could help them avoid sanctions, but if these programs do not improve, they will ultimately become ineligible for federal student aid—which often makes up nearly 90 percent of the revenue at for-profit institutions.
  • More rigorous accountability than previous regulations: The new regulations are tougher than the Department's 2011 rules because they set a higher passing requirement and lay out a shorter path to ineligibility for the poorest-performing programs. In 2012, the Department estimated that 193 programs would not have passed the previous regulations; with respect to these new regulations, based on available data, the Department estimates that about 1,400 programs would not pass the accountability metric.
  • Providing transparency about student success: The rule also provides useful information for all students and consumers by requiring institutions to provide important information about their programs, like what their former students are earning, their success at graduating, and the amount of debt they accumulated.
  • Improving student outcomes: The regulations build on momentum toward increased accountability in higher education by setting standards for career training programs, including programs offered by for-profit institutions, to ensure they are serving students well. While the Department has seen encouraging changes in the past five years, it believes all career training programs can and should meet higher expectations.

Today, the Department is also taking new steps to formalize partnerships with several federal agencies to enhance cooperation and ensure proper oversight of for-profit institutions of higher education through an interagency task force.

Background on the Administration's efforts to protect students from poor-performing career colleges Too often, students at career colleges—including thousands of veterans—are charged excessive costs, but don't get the education they paid for. Instead, students in such programs are provided with poor quality training, often for low-wage jobs or in occupations where there are simply no job opportunities. They find themselves with large amounts of debt and, too often, end up in default. In many cases, students are drawn into these programs with confusing or misleading information.

The situation for students at for-profit institutions is particularly troubling. On average, attending a two-year for-profit institution costs a student four times as much as attending a community college. More than 80 percent of students at for-profits borrow, while less than half of students at public institutions do. Ultimately, students at for-profit colleges represent only about 11 percent of the total higher education population but 44 percent of all federal student loan defaults.

In response to these concerns, in 2009, the Department began extensive conversations with the higher education community about the role of career colleges, particularly on how they could be held accountable for the outcomes of their students. Following a 2012 court decision, which affirmed the U.S. Department of Education's authority to regulate in this area in order to protect students and taxpayers, the Department undertook new efforts to make sure career training programs provide affordable pathways to good jobs.

The Department believes many institutions have already started to take steps to improve. Some of the largest institutions have instituted trial periods for programs before students have to commit, so students can decide if that program is right for them. There are reports that institutions have decreased program lengths. Some are reducing costs. And a few institutions have closed some locations and programs they judge to be performing poorly.

But the Department also believes there is still potential for improvement in many of these programs—public, private non-profit and for-profit—so it is taking action to spur more change.

The gainful employment regulations are a central part of the Administration's work to ensure that student debt is affordable and that for-profit colleges serve students well. These regulations complement other efforts taken by the Administration to protect students by addressing problems at poor performing institutions, particularly in the for-profit sector. These efforts include:

  • Formalizing an interagency oversight task force The Department will lead an effort to formalize an interagency task force to help ensure proper oversight of for-profit institutions of higher education. In particular, the Department and other federal and state agencies will coordinate their activities and promote information sharing to protect students from unfair, deceptive, and abusive policies and practices. The task force will build on efforts already underway among various federal agencies, and include the Departments of Justice, Treasury and Veterans Affairs, as well as the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, Federal Trade Commission, and the Securities and Exchange Commission. In addition, state attorneys general will also be invited to continue their participation in this collaboration. Given the important responsibilities each of these federal agencies has, and the vital role that states play, the agencies will leverage their resources and expertise to assist one another, thereby making the best use of scarce resources and better protecting the interests of students and taxpayers. This task force will formalize and strengthen a working group that has been working together over the past year and that has coordinated efforts in several reviews and investigatory work. The task force will meet as needed, but at least once each quarter.

  • Keeping student debt affordable The Department is helping more students manage their student debt through flexible repayment options like the Pay As You Earn plan, which caps student loan payments at 10 percent of a borrower's discretionary income. In addition, the Administration continues targeted outreach to help borrowers who may be struggling to repay their loans, ensuring that they have the information they need to select the best repayment option for them and avoid future default.

  • Developing a college ratings system The Department is also working on a new college ratings system, which will showcase colleges and universities that are effective in improving student success; incentivize institutions to work toward the most important goals, like graduating low-income students and holding down costs; and help students and families choose their school based on the value it provides for their investment.

  • Strengthening oversight of the programs on which our nation's service members and veterans rely Through Executive Order 13607, the Principles of Excellence for Educational Institutions Serving Service Members, Veterans, Spouses, and Other Family Members, the Administration has worked to protect our nation's military families by ensuring that federal military and veterans educational benefits programs are providing service members, veterans, spouses, and other family members with the information, support, and protections they deserve. This includes: establishing a centralized complaint system; new, risk-based program reviews informed by students complaints to focus enforcement efforts at the Departments of Veterans Affairs, Defense, Education and Justice, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, and the Federal Trade Commission; and key tools and resources like the online GI Bill ® Comparison Tool, which has made it easier for over 450,000 veterans, service members and their dependents to select education and training programs that provide a good value and meet their needs.




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