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Fyffe woman killed in DeKalb County wreck


Alabama State Troopers said a Fyffe woman killed in a single-vehicle crash Thursday morning was not wearing her seat belt. Mary Heather Fuller, 40, was thrown out of her car when it ran off of County Road 50 in DeKalb County around 11:25 a.m. Fuller was ...

Fyffe Police Department Chooses WOLFCOM Police Body Cameras


FYFFE, AL- The Fyffe Police Department recently purchased 5 WOLFCOM VISION Police Body Cameras The purchase also included 1 car kit. “We at WOLFCOM are happy to provide the Fyffe Police Department with the latest in police body camera technology through ...

Jean Nancy Meays Williams


She is survived by a twin sister, Joan Manion, Clifton Park, NY; a brother, Lawrence Ronald Meays and sister-in-law, Marie Meays, New Hartford, NY; two sons, Mark Williams, Lewistown, PA, and Jeffrey Williams, Fyffe, Alabama; two grandchildren ...

Thelma Iona Miller Richey


Alabama and Randal Richey (Evelyn) – Fyffe, Alabama. In addition, their union produced 28 grandchildren and 32 great grandchildren - with others on the way, totaling almost one hundred when in-laws are included. The daughter of the late William Franklin ...

On this day in 1989, tourists flocked to Alabama town of Fyffe after UFO sightings


On Feb. 11, 1989, several people reported seeing UFOs over Fyffe, Ala. The sightings would become a national story. Here is a story I wrote about it for the 25th anniversary in 2014: "FYFFE, Alabama - The prospect of seeing a UFO lured more than 4,000 ...

Game Story


(December 15, 2014: Fyffe, AL 35971) Fyffe Red Devils (Fyffe, AL) backers were pleased Monday as they saw their basketball squad hold off the visiting Crossville Lions (Crossville, AL), 56-49 in a non-league bout. With the victory, Fyffe upgrades its ...

Fyffe Ala. commemorates 1989 UFO sightings with annual festival Saturday


FYFFE, Alabama – The tiny DeKalb County town of Fyffe, with a population hovering at about 900 souls, will celebrate its reputation as a UFO mecca Saturday with its annual festival. Fyffe UFO Day Festival will be from 10 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. Saturday in ...

Drunk woman arrested after riding stolen horse to shop to steal beer


Christine Saunders, 45, from Fyffe, Alabama, allegedly took the horse from a field before galloping off to a nearby store. She then entered the store, allegedly stealing beer and other goods. DeKalb County Sheriff Jimmy Harris said police were called to ...

Last two Fyffe police officers quit, entire force being replaced


FYFFE, Alabama -- The entire Fyffe police force walked off the job and is being replaced, WAFF 48 reports. The last two remaining officers from the Fyffe Police Department resigned Monday, WAFF reports. The relationship between the police department and ...

Wreck near Fyffe kills one


FYFFE, AL (WAFF)- A wreck in Dekalb County has killed one man. It happened around 8 a.m. Sunday on County Road 52, about 10 miles east of Fyffe. State troopers said the driver of a Dodge Ram lost control of the vehicle and ran off the road. Troopers said ...

Jamaican Wedding: Pastry made in Jamaica


wedding-cakes at humming bird hall jamaica The tongue seeks to be pleasured on the wedding day and only the most exquisite foods will satisfy its demand. When it comes to preparing the most delicate o…

Feature on Love under the Caribbean Stars by Denise N. Fyffe


Originally posted on Denise N. Fyffe: Love under the Caribbean stars is a poetry book filled with verses and expressions made by people inspired by love and infatuation. It encapsulates the romantic …
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SPECIAL INFORMATION FOR FYFFE

Fighting against human trafficking in FYFFE ALABAMA

Under Secretary for Civilian Security, Democracy, and Human Rights » Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons » Identify and Assist a Trafficking Victim » 20 Ways You Can Help

20 Ways You Can Help Fight Human Trafficking


After first learning about human trafficking, many people want to help in some way but do not know how. Here are just a few ideas for your consideration.

1. Learn the red flags that may indicate human trafficking and ask follow up questions so that you can help identify a potential trafficking victim. Human trafficking awareness training is available for inpiduals, businesses, first responders, law enforcement, and federal employees.

2. In the United States, call the National Human Trafficking Resource Center at 1-888-373-7888 (24/7) to get help and connect with a service provider in your area, report a tip with information on potential human trafficking activity; or learn more by requesting training, technical assistance, or resources. Call federal law enforcement directly to report suspicious activity and get help from the Department of Homeland Security at 1-866-347-2423 (24/7), or submit a tip online at www.ice.gov/tips, or from the U.S. Department of Justice at 1-888-428-7581 from 9:00am to 5:00pm (EST). Victims, including undocumented inpiduals, are eligible for services and immigration assistance.

3. Be a conscientious consumer. Discover your Slavery Footprint, and check out the Department of Labor’s List of Goods Produced by Child Labor or Forced Labor. Encourage companies, including your own, to take steps to investigate and eliminate slavery and human trafficking in their supply chains and to publish the information for consumer awareness.

4. Incorporate human trafficking information into your professional associations’ conferences, trainings, manuals, and other materials as relevant [example].

5. Join or start a grassroots anti-trafficking coalition.

6. Meet with and/or write to your local, state, and federal government representatives to let them know that you care about combating human trafficking in your community, and ask what they are doing to address human trafficking in your area.

7. Distribute public awareness materials available from the Department of Health and Human Services or Department of Homeland Security.

8. Volunteer to do victim outreach or offer your professional services to a local anti-trafficking organization.

9. Donate funds or needed items to an anti-trafficking organization in your area.

10. Organize a fundraiser and donate the proceeds to an anti-trafficking organization.

11. Host an awareness event to watch and discuss a recent human trafficking documentary. On a larger scale, host a human trafficking film festival.

12. Encourage your local schools to partner with students and include the issue of modern day slavery in their curriculum. As a parent, educator, or school administrator, be aware of how traffickers target school-aged children.

13. Set up a Google alert to receive current human trafficking news.

14. Write a letter to the editor of your local paper about human trafficking in your community.

15. Start or sign a human trafficking petition.

16. Businesses: Provide internships, job skills training, and/or jobs to trafficking survivors. Consumers: Purchase items made by trafficking survivors such as from Jewel Girls or Made by Survivors.

17. Students: Take action on your campus. Join or establish a university or secondary school club to raise awareness about human trafficking and initiate action throughout your local community. Consider doing one of your research papers on a topic concerning human trafficking. Professors: Request that human trafficking be an issue included in university curriculum. Increase scholarship about human trafficking by publishing an article, teaching a class, or hosting a symposium.

18. Law Enforcement Officials: Join or start a local human trafficking task force.

19. Mental Health or Medical Providers: Extend low-cost or free services to human trafficking victims assisted by nearby anti-trafficking organizations. Train your staff on how to identify the indicators of human trafficking and assist victims.

20. Attorneys: Look for signs of human trafficking among your clients. Offer pro-bono services to trafficking victims or anti-trafficking organizations. Learn about and offer to human trafficking victims the legal benefits for which they are eligible. Assist anti-trafficking NGOs with capacity building and legal work.

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FYFFE ALABAMA tspan:3m FYFFE ALABAMA




Responding To and Protecting Students from Sexual Assault in FYFFE ALABAMA

January 26, 2015

Courtesy of Eve Hill and Mark Kappelhoff, Deputy Assistant Attorneys General for the Civil Rights pision

Note: The sample MOU can be found at here.

President Obama established the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault one year ago. On this anniversary, the task force has released a sample memorandum of understanding (MOU) to assist campuses and law enforcement agencies to work together in their efforts to protect students, address the needs of sexual assault survivors, and ensure a prompt, thorough, and fair response to allegations of sexual misconduct. This is yet another important step in the task force’s effort to help colleges and universities, as well as their partners in the community, address the problem of campus sexual violence.

While colleges and universities can do much on their own, communication and collaboration between campus administrators, campus police and local law enforcement is critically important to address the problem of sexual assault on campus.

The sample MOU reflects input from task force members and agencies, outside experts on sexual assault, police associations, state attorneys general, and campus administrators and counsels.

Many colleges and universities already have MOUs in place with local law enforcement authorities covering a variety of areas. Our conversations with campus administrators, campus police, and law enforcement have underscored the need for additional tools and strategies that are specifically tailored to the dynamics of sexual assault on campus, as well as the needs of sexual assault survivors. The task force is providing this sample MOU with that in mind.

We recognize that every campus and community is unique and there is no one-size-fits-all solution. The sample MOU is, therefore, intended to be a starting point for a conversation between campus administrators, campus police and local law enforcement on how to improve collaborations between critical first responders. We fully expect that, in partnering to address the issue of sexual violence on campus, campus administrators and law enforcement will adapt the provisions of the sample MOU to meet their particular needs and circumstances. For example, some campus and law enforcement authorities may wish to incorporate some or all of the provisions into an existing general campus safety MOU, while others may prefer a standalone agreement specifically addressing campus sexual violence. Still others may decide that some different method of collaboration better meets their needs. We hope that this sample MOU will be an important resource in collaborative efforts between campus administrators, campus police and law enforcement to eradicate sexual assault from college communities nationwide.

Posted in: 

Civil Rights pision

Office on Violence Against Women

[24]



Fighting against human trafficking in FYFFE ALABAMA

Under Secretary for Civilian Security, Democracy, and Human Rights » Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons » Identify and Assist a Trafficking Victim » 20 Ways You Can Help

20 Ways You Can Help Fight Human Trafficking


After first learning about human trafficking, many people want to help in some way but do not know how. Here are just a few ideas for your consideration.

1. Learn the red flags that may indicate human trafficking and ask follow up questions so that you can help identify a potential trafficking victim. Human trafficking awareness training is available for inpiduals, businesses, first responders, law enforcement, and federal employees.

2. In the United States, call the National Human Trafficking Resource Center at 1-888-373-7888 (24/7) to get help and connect with a service provider in your area, report a tip with information on potential human trafficking activity; or learn more by requesting training, technical assistance, or resources. Call federal law enforcement directly to report suspicious activity and get help from the Department of Homeland Security at 1-866-347-2423 (24/7), or submit a tip online at www.ice.gov/tips, or from the U.S. Department of Justice at 1-888-428-7581 from 9:00am to 5:00pm (EST). Victims, including undocumented inpiduals, are eligible for services and immigration assistance.

3. Be a conscientious consumer. Discover your Slavery Footprint, and check out the Department of Labor’s List of Goods Produced by Child Labor or Forced Labor. Encourage companies, including your own, to take steps to investigate and eliminate slavery and human trafficking in their supply chains and to publish the information for consumer awareness.

4. Incorporate human trafficking information into your professional associations’ conferences, trainings, manuals, and other materials as relevant [example].

5. Join or start a grassroots anti-trafficking coalition.

6. Meet with and/or write to your local, state, and federal government representatives to let them know that you care about combating human trafficking in your community, and ask what they are doing to address human trafficking in your area.

7. Distribute public awareness materials available from the Department of Health and Human Services or Department of Homeland Security.

8. Volunteer to do victim outreach or offer your professional services to a local anti-trafficking organization.

9. Donate funds or needed items to an anti-trafficking organization in your area.

10. Organize a fundraiser and donate the proceeds to an anti-trafficking organization.

11. Host an awareness event to watch and discuss a recent human trafficking documentary. On a larger scale, host a human trafficking film festival.

12. Encourage your local schools to partner with students and include the issue of modern day slavery in their curriculum. As a parent, educator, or school administrator, be aware of how traffickers target school-aged children.

13. Set up a Google alert to receive current human trafficking news.

14. Write a letter to the editor of your local paper about human trafficking in your community.

15. Start or sign a human trafficking petition.

16. Businesses: Provide internships, job skills training, and/or jobs to trafficking survivors. Consumers: Purchase items made by trafficking survivors such as from Jewel Girls or Made by Survivors.

17. Students: Take action on your campus. Join or establish a university or secondary school club to raise awareness about human trafficking and initiate action throughout your local community. Consider doing one of your research papers on a topic concerning human trafficking. Professors: Request that human trafficking be an issue included in university curriculum. Increase scholarship about human trafficking by publishing an article, teaching a class, or hosting a symposium.

18. Law Enforcement Officials: Join or start a local human trafficking task force.

19. Mental Health or Medical Providers: Extend low-cost or free services to human trafficking victims assisted by nearby anti-trafficking organizations. Train your staff on how to identify the indicators of human trafficking and assist victims.

20. Attorneys: Look for signs of human trafficking among your clients. Offer pro-bono services to trafficking victims or anti-trafficking organizations. Learn about and offer to human trafficking victims the legal benefits for which they are eligible. Assist anti-trafficking NGOs with capacity building and legal work.

[16]








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