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Great Bend family crisis center loses grant money


The Great Bend Family Crisis Center lost its grant money to help pay ...
"So far we haven't had to say no, but that's a word that may be in our vocabulary." Kansas Housing Resources denied the request for a grant to help the shelter pay for basic things ...

OSHA investigating Kansas oil field death


GREAT BEND, Kan. — A federal agency is investigating the death of a 30-year-old oil field worker in central Kansas. The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration said in a release late Thursday the agency’s Wichita ...

Family Crisis Center in Great Bend Loses Grant


Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window) Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window) KSN News GREAT BEND, Kansas- The Family Crisis Center in Great Bend ...

Kelly Bostian: Slow riders raft the Arkansas River from Kansas to the Mississippi


he talked about the 25 days he and friends Donny Knowles and Susana Sierra have spent on the river in their quest to float the muddy currents from Great Bend, Kansas, to the Mississippi River. Rookie rafters on a by-the-seat-of-their-pant s adventure ...

Authorities capture jail escape in Great Bend


GREAT BEND, Kan. (AP) - Authorities have captured a man who escaped from a Kansas jail. The Hutchinson News (http://bit.ly/1TciGHm) reports that police received information Friday night that Rory Wright was at a Great Bend home. Police said in a news ...

Business people for July 5


WICHITA – American State Bancshares of Great Bend has announced the appointment of Alan H. Schmidt to the newly created position of Director of Residential Mortgage Lending for all of its subsidiaries in Kansas. Schmidt will oversee and coordinate the ...

OSHA investigates death of Kansas oil field worker


GREAT BEND, Kan. — OSHA is now investigating the death of an oil field worker in central Kansas. The 30-year-old man was found unresponsive on a hot day at a well site in Great Bend, Kansas this Tuesday. He was an employee of Klima Well Service Inc. The ...

Kansas Wetlands Educational Center host Aquatic Camp


The weather was perfect for this years aquatic camp which is hosted by the Kansas Wetlands Educational Center and the Great Bend Recreation Center. Children of all ages met at the Great Bend Recreation Center and then bussed out to the Kansas Wetlands ...

Rural Kansas Man Drowns In Above-Ground Pool


GREAT BEND, Kan. (AP) — A central Kansas man died after apparently hitting his head when he dove into an above-ground pool. Barton County Sheriff Brian Bellendir says 36-year-old Ryan Fanshier, of rural Great Bend, died in the accident Wednesday night.

Kansas man drowns in above-ground pool


Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window) Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window) GREAT BEND, Kan. (AP) — A central Kansas man died after apparently ...

Family Crisis Center in Great Bend Loses Grant


GREAT BEND, Kansas- The Family Crisis Center in Great Bend lost a grant that helps with homelessness for domestic violence victims. Overall the Crisis Center will lose $76,388 dollars of grant money…

Firecracker Sale in Great Bend, Kansas


Firecracker Sale at Family Jewels in Great Bend, Kansas Starts with sterling silver charms at $4.99 each. Full sterling silver charms of your choice. Over 1000 available at our Great Bend Store. On…
Jobs from Indeed




SPECIAL INFORMATION FOR GREAT BEND

Fighting against human trafficking in GREAT BEND KANSAS

Under Secretary for Civilian Security, Democracy, and Human Rights » Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons » Identify and Assist a Trafficking Victim » 20 Ways You Can Help

20 Ways You Can Help Fight Human Trafficking


After first learning about human trafficking, many people want to help in some way but do not know how. Here are just a few ideas for your consideration.

1. Learn the red flags that may indicate human trafficking and ask follow up questions so that you can help identify a potential trafficking victim. Human trafficking awareness training is available for inpiduals, businesses, first responders, law enforcement, and federal employees.

2. In the United States, call the National Human Trafficking Resource Center at 1-888-373-7888 (24/7) to get help and connect with a service provider in your area, report a tip with information on potential human trafficking activity; or learn more by requesting training, technical assistance, or resources. Call federal law enforcement directly to report suspicious activity and get help from the Department of Homeland Security at 1-866-347-2423 (24/7), or submit a tip online at www.ice.gov/tips, or from the U.S. Department of Justice at 1-888-428-7581 from 9:00am to 5:00pm (EST). Victims, including undocumented inpiduals, are eligible for services and immigration assistance.

3. Be a conscientious consumer. Discover your Slavery Footprint, and check out the Department of Labor’s List of Goods Produced by Child Labor or Forced Labor. Encourage companies, including your own, to take steps to investigate and eliminate slavery and human trafficking in their supply chains and to publish the information for consumer awareness.

4. Incorporate human trafficking information into your professional associations’ conferences, trainings, manuals, and other materials as relevant [example].

5. Join or start a grassroots anti-trafficking coalition.

6. Meet with and/or write to your local, state, and federal government representatives to let them know that you care about combating human trafficking in your community, and ask what they are doing to address human trafficking in your area.

7. Distribute public awareness materials available from the Department of Health and Human Services or Department of Homeland Security.

8. Volunteer to do victim outreach or offer your professional services to a local anti-trafficking organization.

9. Donate funds or needed items to an anti-trafficking organization in your area.

10. Organize a fundraiser and donate the proceeds to an anti-trafficking organization.

11. Host an awareness event to watch and discuss a recent human trafficking documentary. On a larger scale, host a human trafficking film festival.

12. Encourage your local schools to partner with students and include the issue of modern day slavery in their curriculum. As a parent, educator, or school administrator, be aware of how traffickers target school-aged children.

13. Set up a Google alert to receive current human trafficking news.

14. Write a letter to the editor of your local paper about human trafficking in your community.

15. Start or sign a human trafficking petition.

16. Businesses: Provide internships, job skills training, and/or jobs to trafficking survivors. Consumers: Purchase items made by trafficking survivors such as from Jewel Girls or Made by Survivors.

17. Students: Take action on your campus. Join or establish a university or secondary school club to raise awareness about human trafficking and initiate action throughout your local community. Consider doing one of your research papers on a topic concerning human trafficking. Professors: Request that human trafficking be an issue included in university curriculum. Increase scholarship about human trafficking by publishing an article, teaching a class, or hosting a symposium.

18. Law Enforcement Officials: Join or start a local human trafficking task force.

19. Mental Health or Medical Providers: Extend low-cost or free services to human trafficking victims assisted by nearby anti-trafficking organizations. Train your staff on how to identify the indicators of human trafficking and assist victims.

20. Attorneys: Look for signs of human trafficking among your clients. Offer pro-bono services to trafficking victims or anti-trafficking organizations. Learn about and offer to human trafficking victims the legal benefits for which they are eligible. Assist anti-trafficking NGOs with capacity building and legal work.

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Make Your Health Benefits Work for You in GREAT BEND KANSAS

The Department of Labor´s Employee Benefits Security Administration (EBSA) administers several important health benefit laws covering employer-based health plans. They govern your basic rights to information about how your health plan works, how to qualify for benefits, and how to make claims for benefits.

In addition, there are specific laws protecting your right to health benefits when you lose coverage or change jobs. EBSA also oversees health care laws covering special medical conditions. For more information on the laws that protect your benefits, see EBSA´s Website. Or call the agency toll free at 1-866-444-3272 to reach a regional office near you. These 10 tips can help make your health benefits work better for you.

1. Explore Your Options for Health Coverage

You have options for health coverage. There are many different types of health benefit plans. Find out what your employer offers, then check out the plan (or plans). Your employer´s human resource office, the health plan administrator, or your union can provide information to help you match your needs and preferences with the available plans. Or consider a health plan through the Health Insurance Marketplace. Visit HealthCare.gov to see the health plan options available in your area. Get information about all of your options and review it. The more information you have, the better your health care decisions will be.

2. Review the Benefits Available

Do the plans offered cover the benefits that are important to you, such as mental health services, well-baby care, vision or dental care? Are there deductibles? What are the out-of-pocket expenses you may face? Determine your needs and priorities. Compare all of your options before you decide which coverage to elect. Matching your needs and those of your family members will result in the best possible benefits. Cheapest may not always be best. Your goal is high quality health benefits.

3. Read Your Plan´s Summary Plan Description (SPD) for the Wealth of Information It Provides

Your health plan administrator should provide a copy. It outlines your benefits and your legal rights under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA), the Federal law that protects your health benefits. It also should contain information about the coverage of dependents, what services will require a co-payment or coinsurance, and the circumstances under which your employer can change or terminate a health benefits plan. You also can find many of the answers to your questions in the Summary of Benefits and Coverage (SBC), a short, easy-to-understand summary of what a plan covers and what it costs. You should receive a copy with your enrollment materials. Save the SPD, the SBC, and all other health plan brochures and documents, along with memos or correspondence from your employer relating to health benefits.

4. Use Your Health Coverage

Once your health coverage has started, use it to help cover medical costs for services like going to the doctor, filling prescriptions or getting emergency care. Using your benefits will help you and your family stay healthy and reduce your health care costs. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) provides many valuable protections for people enrolled in employment-based health plans including prohibiting preexisting condition exclusions and annual and lifetime limits on essential health benefits. What’s more, many plans cover certain preventive services for free, including routine vaccinations, regular well-baby and well-child visits, blood pressure, diabetes and cholesterol tests, and many cancer screenings. You also can keep your children on your health plan until age 26. Take advantage of your benefits, especially free preventive care if your plan covers it. If you were required to pay cost-sharing for a preventive service, check your Explanation of Benefits and ensure that the provider billed the service properly.

5. Understand Your Plan’s Mental Health and Substance Use Coverage

Many health plans provide coverage for mental health and substance use disorder benefits. If a plan does offer these benefits, the financial requirements (such as co-payments and deductibles) and the quantitative treatment limits (such as visit limits) for the mental health and substance use disorder benefits cannot be more restrictive than the financial requirements or treatment limits applied to medical/surgical benefits. Plans also cannot impose lifetime and annual limits on the dollar amount of mental health and substance use disorder services, including behavioral health treatment. Some plans cover preventive services like screenings for depression and child behavioral assessments for free. Check your SPD and SBC to find out what your plan covers.

6. Look For Wellness Programs

More employers are establishing wellness programs that encourage employees to work out, stop smoking, and generally adopt healthier lifestyles. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and the ACA encourage group health plans to adopt wellness programs but also includes protections for employees and dependents from impermissible discrimination based on a health factor. These programs often provide rewards such as cost savings as well as promoting good health. Check your SPD and SBC to see whether your plan offers a wellness program(s). If your plan does, find out what reward is offered and what you need to do to receive it.

7. Know How to File an Appeal if Your Health Benefits Claim is Denied

Understand your plan’s procedures for filing a claim for benefits and where to make appeals of the plan´s decisions. Pay attention to time limits – make sure you timely file claims and appeals and that the plan makes decisions on time. Keep records and copies of correspondence. Check your health benefits package and your SPD to determine who is responsible for handling problems with benefit claims. Contact EBSA for assistance if you are unable to obtain a response to your complaint.

8. Assess Your Benefits Coverage as Your Family Status Changes

Marriage, Porce, childbirth or adoption, the death of a spouse, and aging out of a parent’s health plan are life events that may signal a need to change your health benefits. You, your spouse, and your dependent children may be eligible for special enrollment into other employer health coverage or through the Health Insurance Marketplace. Even without life-changing events, the information provided by your employer should tell you how you can change benefits or switch plans. If you’re considering special enrollment, act quickly. You have 30 days after the life event to request special enrollment in other employer coverage or 60 days to select a plan in the Marketplace.

9. Be Aware that Changing Jobs and Other Work Events Can Affect Your Health Benefits

If you change employers or lose your job, you may need to find other health coverage. If you have a new job, consider enrolling in your new employer’s plan. Whether starting or losing a job, you may be eligible to special enroll in a spouse’s employer-sponsored plan or through the Health Insurance Marketplace. Under the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act – better known as COBRA – you, your covered spouse, and your dependent children may be eligible to continue coverage under your former employer-sponsored plan. This coverage is temporary (generally 18 to 36 months) and you may have to pay the entire premium plus a 2 percent administrative charge. Get information on your coverage options and compare. Be aware of the deadlines for deciding on coverage and find out when your new coverage will be effective.

10. Plan For Retirement

Before you retire, find out what health benefits, if any, extend to you and your spouse during your retirement years. Consult with your employer´s human resources office, your union, or the plan administrator. Check your SPD and other plan documents. Make sure there is no conflicting information among these sources about the benefits you will receive or the circumstances under which they can change or be eliminated. With this information in hand, you can make other important choices, like finding out if you are eligible for Medicare and Medigap insurance coverage. If you want to retire before you are eligible for Medicare and your employer does not provide health benefits in retirement, consider what you will do for health coverage. Your options may include enrolling in a spouse’s employer plan or in a Marketplace plan or temporarily continuing your employer coverage by electing COBRA. Planning for retirement includes planning for your health coverage in retirement. To find out more, read Taking the Mystery Out of Retirement Planning.

These Laws Can Help

  • The Employee Retirement Income Security Act – Offers protection for inPiduals enrolled in retirement, health, and other benefit plans sponsored by private-sector employers, and provides rights to information and a claims and appeals process for participants to get benefits from their plans.
  • The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act – Creates the Health Insurance Marketplace and provides protections for employment-based health coverage, including extending dependent coverage of children to age 26; prohibiting preexisting condition exclusions and prohibiting lifetime and annual limits on essential health benefits.
  • The Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act – Contains provisions giving certain former employees, retirees, spouses, and dependent children the right to purchase temporary continuation of group health plan coverage at group rates in specific instances.
  • The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act – Allows employees, their spouses and their dependents to enroll in employer-provided health coverage regardless of open enrollment periods if they lose coverage or in the event of marriage, birth, adoption or placement for adoption. Also prohibits discrimination in health care coverage.
  • The Women´s Health and Cancer Rights Act – Offers protections for breast cancer patients who elect breast reconstruction in connection with a mastectomy.
  • The Newborns´ and Mothers´ Health Protection Act – Provides rules on minimum coverage for hospital lengths of stay following childbirth.
  • The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act – Prohibits discrimination in group health plan premiums based on genetic information. Also, generally prohibits group health plans from requesting genetic information or requiring genetic tests.
  • The Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act and the Mental Health Parity Act – Requires parity in financial requirements and treatment limitations for mental health and substance use benefits with those for medical and surgical benefits.
  • The Children´s Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act – Allows special enrollment in a group health plan if an employee or dependents lose coverage under CHIP or Medicaid or are eligible for premium assistance under those programs.

For More Information

Visit the Employee Benefits Security Administration’s Website to view the following publications. To order copies or to request assistance from a benefits advisor, contact EBSA electronically or call toll free 1-866-444-3272.

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What do you think about "clemency" being aplied to criminals in GREAT BEND KANSAS?

Based on its commitment to address issues of injustice in judgment, President Obama awarded 22 commutations today people serving time in a federal prison. If they had been condemned by the current laws and policies, many of these people would have already served his time and paid his debt to society.Because many were convicted under a regime of obsolete sentence served years - in some cases more than a decade - more than individuals convicted today for the same offense.

In total, 22 commutations granted today underscore the President´s commitment to use all the tools at their disposal to achieve greater justice and fairness in our justice system. We further demonstrate how the exercise of this important Instituition can remedy imbalances and correct errors in judgment. Added to its previous 21 commutations, the President has granted 43 switches in total. To put the actions of President Obama in context, President George W. Bush commuted 11 convictions in his eight years in office.

To further this progress, the President has established a leniency to encourage people who were convicted under laws and policies obsolete switch request initiative. In his address, major reforms have followed, including the enactment of new criteria for potential candidates switching to satisfy even those who pose no danger to public safety, have a clean record in prison, and have been convicted in out of date laws. The Department of Justice has raised awareness about applying switching to ensure that each federal prisoner who believe are worthy of this second invaluable opportunity have the opportunity to ask for it.

Emphasizing the responsibility that brings a switchover, the President wrote a letter to each of the 22 people who received clemency today, recognizing its potential to overcome the mistakes they made and encourage them to make good decisions moving forward.

While today´s announcement represents a major advance, there is more work to delante.La Administration will continue to work to thoroughly review all requests for clemencia.Y while switching is an important tool for those seeking justice and equity in our criminal justice system, it is almost always an option of last resort, which comes after a long trial and years behind bars. That is why President Obama is committed to working with Democrats and Republicans in sensible to our criminal justice system aimed give judges greater discretion over mandatory minimum sentencing reforms. As the Department of Justice has pointed out, sometimes mandatory minimum sentences have resulted in more severe penalties for nonviolent drug offenders that many violent offenders and are not necessary for processing at this level.

Now, a major reform became law. In 2010, the President signed the Fair Sentencing Act, which reduced the disparity in the amounts of powder cocaine and crack need for the imposition of mandatory minimum sentences. The President is encouraged by the bipartisan support for improving our criminal justice system, including the promise of legislation to implement front-end changes in sentencing.It also supports bipartisan efforts to provide back-end support through education and work better training for those currently incarcerated and reforming our juvenile justice system to build on the significant reductions in the number Youth held in secure facilities.

Ensuring fairness in our criminal justice system will require ongoing efforts to invest in the types of programs that help prevent individuals turning to crime, such as education and employment, as well as changes in our sentencing laws to ensure that the punishment really fit the crime. As we work to make those improvements, the President will continue to use its authority leniency in certain cases where justice, fairness and proportionality so require, and give eligible and worthy people who have paid their debt to society the opportunity contribute in the sense ways. [7]










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Newsof.org. Selected the top stories of the city of GREAT BEND KANSAS. Political events, traffic accidents on highways, downtown events, neighborhoods and inside. Also researched local newspapers and social networks, as well as the site of City Hall. Crimes, are always subject to demand generally for information. Also the tragedies and disasters such as fires, floods, flooding, rain, hail and winds. Tags: Breaking News, GREAT BEND KANSAS, City, Indoors, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday , Friday, Saturday, Sunday, Car, Crash, Elections, Beating, Accident, Crime, Police, Criminal, Police, Road, Highway Access, Elections, Party, Hail, Rain, Flood, Anniversary, Award, Month, Week End , Today, Yesterday, Female, Male, Family, Child, People.