GUNNISON COLORADO
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Latest News - GUNNISON COLORADO

There really is a smell when it rains, called petrichor


So there you go. We have had a lot of petrichor this weekend, don’t you think?! That’s just a bit of trivia to thrill your co-workers with when you get back to the office this week. Or, impress your teacher with what you learned over the weekend.

River runners think runoff is over this spring


The low Gunnison Basin snowpack translates to an inflow to Blue Mesa Reservoir at 450,000 acre feet. “That’s 67 percent of the 30-year average,” said Erik Knight, a hydrologist for the Bureau of Reclamation’s Western Colorado office. When full ...

New Colorado water rights transfer allows farmers to irrigate, then profit by leaving water in the stream


Now, it has collaborated with the Colorado Water Conservation Board (CWCB) to restore late summer flows to a 5-mile stretch of the Little Cimarron River in the Gunnison River Basin by sharing an agricultural water right. Water Trust Executive Director Amy ...

National Parks, One Key to Colorado Economy


It’s a result we all can support.” Colorado’s 12 national parks include: Black Canyon of the Gunnison, Great Sand Dunes, Mesa Verde and Rocky Mountain national parks; Colorado, Dinosaur, Florissant Fossil Beds, Hovenweep and Yucca House national ...

Meet the Transportation Committee's Majority Staff


Kennedy School of Government. Matt Sturges is a native of Ohio, but he attended college in the mountainous and distinctly nonurban town of Gunnison, Colorado, home to Western State Colorado University. "Best decision I ever made was going to college at ...

Thrown into the maze: A U.S. citizen’s unfortunate odyssey through the immigration system


He was allowed to telephone his aunt and uncle, who lived in Gunnison, to tell them where he was. Before they could seek help for him, he was driven another 164 miles north to an ICE detention facility in Colorado Springs. His last stop was Aurora where he ...

Mitchell, Edward E.


In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the Valerie Mitchell Scholarship Fund at Western State Colorado University, 909 Escalante Drive, Gunnison, CO 81230, or to the donor’s choice. Jolliffe Funeral Home in Scottsbluff is assisting the family.

Colorado outdoor jazz festivals for summer 2015


There's nothing like taking in a live show at Red Rocks or one of Colorado's esteemed mountain festivals ...
celebration featuring Bonnie Lowdermilk and Eric Gunnison at Nocturne Jazz And Supper Club on what would have been Fitzgerald's 98th birthday ...

Visit National Parks Free During National Park Week


The free admission event includes opening weekend, April 18-19. Colorado has 13 national parks including Rocky Mountain National Park, Black Canyon of the Gunnison, Colorado National Monument, Dinosaur National Monument and the Great Sand Dunes.

Colorado fisheries experts working to rebuild kokanee salmon fishery in Blue Mesa Reservoir


Earlier this month, Colorado Parks and Wildlife released about 3 million fingerling kokanee from the Roaring Judy Hatchery into Blue Mesa Reservoir, near Gunnison. The fish that reach maturity will return to spawn in two to five years. Kokanee at Blue Mesa ...

Monsters Among Us: Roy Melanson killed two women; Sentenced to life in prison in both Colorado and California


Victims Anita Fagiani Andrews Michele Wallace Charlotte Lily Sauerwin [8/6/1988] Find-A-Grave: Michele Wallace Find-A-Grave: Anita E Fagiani Andrews Find-A-Grave: Charlotte Lilly Sauerwin Anita…

Goodbye Shopper and Jackie Chan — Gunnison, CO


Goodbye Shopper and Jackie Chan - Gunnison, CO Gunnison, CO Said goodbye to our precious feline Shopper. In Gunnison we had lunch with Stu then went over to David's hou…

10 Open Houses this weekend in Loveland


Get a sneak peek of today’s open homes. Find Homes Check out 10 Open Houses this weekend: OPEN HOUSE: Sunday Apr 26, 2:00pm to 4:00pm 2024 Tincup Drive…

46 Open Houses this weekend in Larimer County, CO


Get a sneak peek of today’s open homes. Find Homes Check out 10 Open Houses this weekend: OPEN HOUSE: Sunday Apr 26, 2:00pm to 4:00pm 2024 Tincup Drive…

8 Open Houses this weekend in Loveland


Get a sneak peek of today's open homes. …

Snowpack news: “Snowpack still low in Colorado; Lake Powell inflows below average” — Hannah Holm #ColoradoRiver


<img width="150" height="116" src="https://coyotegulch. files.wordpress.com/2015/ 04/snowpackcolorado042220 15.jpg?w=150&h=116" class="attachment-thumbna il" alt="snowpackcolorado0422 2015" data-attachment…

Adventure in the Rockies


My first set of adventures in Colorado were spectacular and grandiose in scale and quick in time.  The thing about Colorado is that it’s elevated above sea lea.  I mean high.  Writing this in Durango,…

Colorado fisheries experts working to rebuild kokanee salmon fishery in Blue Mesa Reservoir


Kokanee salmon caught at Green Mountain Reservoir, Summit County, Colorado. @bberwyn photo. Big restocking effort could boost populations over the next few years Staff Report FRISCO — Predation by …

Anglers’ Roundtable in Gunnison, April 13


GUNNISON, Colo. – Colorado Parks and Wildlife wants to hear from anglers regarding fishing in the Gunnison Basin at an Anglers’ Roundtable, 6:30 p.m., April 13 at the Fred R. Field Heritage Center at …

Subscriber Summit Presentation 2015 in Toronto: Vortrag von Excelsior Mining's VP Corporate Affairs JJ Jennex


Exzellenter Vortrag von Excelsior Mining's (TSX-V:MIN) JJ Jennex - credit to CEO.CA: Quelle: bigcharts.com Quote: Excelsior Mining, Kupferprojekt Gunnison: Arbeitsprogramme für finale Machbarkeit…




SPECIAL INFORMATION FOR GUNNISON

How can I follow Congressman votes that I have chosen in GUNNISON COLORADO

How to . . .   observe about congressional votes  All voting in Congress is a matter of public record. However, not all floor votes are roll call votes. There are voice votes (“aye” or “no”) and pision or standing votes (where the presiding officer counts Members), and these types of votes do not indicate by name how a member voted. Senate.gov

Senate roll call vote tallies are posted online within an hour of the vote.   You can view today´s votes or use the vote tables to look at any roll call vote taken since the 101st Congress (1989).  In addition to vote tallies, the entries also provide brief descriptions of the votes and links to Congress.gov for the texts of the legislation.

House.gov

House roll call vote tallies are posted online directly following the vote.   You can view votes from this Congress or use the archives to look at any roll call vote taken since the 101st Congress, 2nd session (1990).  In addition to vote tallies, the entries provide brief descriptions of the votes.

Congress.gov

Congress.gov provides Senate recorded floor votes going back to the 101st Congress (1989-90) and House recorded floor votes going back to the second session of the 101st Congress (1990). To access votes using Congress.gov search for a bill and click on the "Actions" tab. All House and Senate roll call votes will be listed with links to the House and Senate´s web pages.

Congressional Record

The Congressional Record is the official source of information on recorded floor votes.  Votes are printed in the daily Record as they occur on the floor. The votes provide an alphabetical listing of members under “yea,” “nay,” and “not voting” categories and show the overall tally for each category.  However, votes are not identified by party or by state. The Daily Digest section that is printed at the end of each Record shows how many roll call votes were taken that day and show on what page in the Record the votes can be found. TheCongressional Record Index provides subject access to the votes (under “Votes in Senate” and “Votes in House.”)

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Domestic violence in GUNNISON COLORADO

Does your partner ever….

> Embarrass you with put-downs?

> Control what you do, who you see or talk to or where you go?

> Look at you or act in ways that scare you?

> Push you, slap you, choke you or hit you?

> Stop you from seeing your friends or family members?

> Control the money in the relationship? Take your money or Social Security check, make you ask for money or refuse to give you money?

> Make all of the decisions?

> Tell you that you’re a bad parent or threaten to take away your children?

> Prevent you from working or attending school?

> Act like the abuse is no big deal, deny the abuse or tell you it’s your own fault?

> Destroy your property or threaten to kill your pets?

> Intimidate you with guns, knives or other weapons?

> Attempt to force you to drop criminal charges?

> Threaten to commit suicide, or threaten to kill you?

If you answered ‘yes’ to even one of these questions, you may be in an unhealthy or abusive relationship. Don’t hesitate to chat or call to 1-800-799-SAFE if anything you read raises a red flag about your own relationship or that of someone you know.

For over 17 years, the National Domestic Violence Hotline has been the vital link to safety for women, men, children and families affected by domestic violence. With the help of our dedicated advocates and staff, we respond to calls 24/7, 365 days a year.

We provide confidential, one-on-one support to each caller and chatter, offering crisis intervention, options for next steps and direct connection to sources for immediate safety. Our database holds over 5,000 agencies and resources in communities all across the country. Bilingual advocates are on hand to speak with callers, and our Language Line offers translations in 170+ different languages.

The Hotline is an excellent source of help for concerned friends, family, co-workers and others seeking information and guidance on how to help someone they know. We work to educate communities all over through events, campaigns, and dynamic partnerships with companies ranging from The Avon Foundation to Verizon. Today, The Hotline is continuing to grow and explore new avenues of service.

http://www.thehotline.org/

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Make Your Health Benefits Work for You in GUNNISON COLORADO

The Department of Labor´s Employee Benefits Security Administration (EBSA) administers several important health benefit laws covering employer-based health plans. They govern your basic rights to information about how your health plan works, how to qualify for benefits, and how to make claims for benefits.

In addition, there are specific laws protecting your right to health benefits when you lose coverage or change jobs. EBSA also oversees health care laws covering special medical conditions. For more information on the laws that protect your benefits, see EBSA´s Website. Or call the agency toll free at 1-866-444-3272 to reach a regional office near you. These 10 tips can help make your health benefits work better for you.

1. Explore Your Options for Health Coverage

You have options for health coverage. There are many different types of health benefit plans. Find out what your employer offers, then check out the plan (or plans). Your employer´s human resource office, the health plan administrator, or your union can provide information to help you match your needs and preferences with the available plans. Or consider a health plan through the Health Insurance Marketplace. Visit HealthCare.gov to see the health plan options available in your area. Get information about all of your options and review it. The more information you have, the better your health care decisions will be.

2. Review the Benefits Available

Do the plans offered cover the benefits that are important to you, such as mental health services, well-baby care, vision or dental care? Are there deductibles? What are the out-of-pocket expenses you may face? Determine your needs and priorities. Compare all of your options before you decide which coverage to elect. Matching your needs and those of your family members will result in the best possible benefits. Cheapest may not always be best. Your goal is high quality health benefits.

3. Read Your Plan´s Summary Plan Description (SPD) for the Wealth of Information It Provides

Your health plan administrator should provide a copy. It outlines your benefits and your legal rights under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA), the Federal law that protects your health benefits. It also should contain information about the coverage of dependents, what services will require a co-payment or coinsurance, and the circumstances under which your employer can change or terminate a health benefits plan. You also can find many of the answers to your questions in the Summary of Benefits and Coverage (SBC), a short, easy-to-understand summary of what a plan covers and what it costs. You should receive a copy with your enrollment materials. Save the SPD, the SBC, and all other health plan brochures and documents, along with memos or correspondence from your employer relating to health benefits.

4. Use Your Health Coverage

Once your health coverage has started, use it to help cover medical costs for services like going to the doctor, filling prescriptions or getting emergency care. Using your benefits will help you and your family stay healthy and reduce your health care costs. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) provides many valuable protections for people enrolled in employment-based health plans including prohibiting preexisting condition exclusions and annual and lifetime limits on essential health benefits. What’s more, many plans cover certain preventive services for free, including routine vaccinations, regular well-baby and well-child visits, blood pressure, diabetes and cholesterol tests, and many cancer screenings. You also can keep your children on your health plan until age 26. Take advantage of your benefits, especially free preventive care if your plan covers it. If you were required to pay cost-sharing for a preventive service, check your Explanation of Benefits and ensure that the provider billed the service properly.

5. Understand Your Plan’s Mental Health and Substance Use Coverage

Many health plans provide coverage for mental health and substance use disorder benefits. If a plan does offer these benefits, the financial requirements (such as co-payments and deductibles) and the quantitative treatment limits (such as visit limits) for the mental health and substance use disorder benefits cannot be more restrictive than the financial requirements or treatment limits applied to medical/surgical benefits. Plans also cannot impose lifetime and annual limits on the dollar amount of mental health and substance use disorder services, including behavioral health treatment. Some plans cover preventive services like screenings for depression and child behavioral assessments for free. Check your SPD and SBC to find out what your plan covers.

6. Look For Wellness Programs

More employers are establishing wellness programs that encourage employees to work out, stop smoking, and generally adopt healthier lifestyles. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and the ACA encourage group health plans to adopt wellness programs but also includes protections for employees and dependents from impermissible discrimination based on a health factor. These programs often provide rewards such as cost savings as well as promoting good health. Check your SPD and SBC to see whether your plan offers a wellness program(s). If your plan does, find out what reward is offered and what you need to do to receive it.

7. Know How to File an Appeal if Your Health Benefits Claim is Denied

Understand your plan’s procedures for filing a claim for benefits and where to make appeals of the plan´s decisions. Pay attention to time limits – make sure you timely file claims and appeals and that the plan makes decisions on time. Keep records and copies of correspondence. Check your health benefits package and your SPD to determine who is responsible for handling problems with benefit claims. Contact EBSA for assistance if you are unable to obtain a response to your complaint.

8. Assess Your Benefits Coverage as Your Family Status Changes

Marriage, Porce, childbirth or adoption, the death of a spouse, and aging out of a parent’s health plan are life events that may signal a need to change your health benefits. You, your spouse, and your dependent children may be eligible for special enrollment into other employer health coverage or through the Health Insurance Marketplace. Even without life-changing events, the information provided by your employer should tell you how you can change benefits or switch plans. If you’re considering special enrollment, act quickly. You have 30 days after the life event to request special enrollment in other employer coverage or 60 days to select a plan in the Marketplace.

9. Be Aware that Changing Jobs and Other Work Events Can Affect Your Health Benefits

If you change employers or lose your job, you may need to find other health coverage. If you have a new job, consider enrolling in your new employer’s plan. Whether starting or losing a job, you may be eligible to special enroll in a spouse’s employer-sponsored plan or through the Health Insurance Marketplace. Under the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act – better known as COBRA – you, your covered spouse, and your dependent children may be eligible to continue coverage under your former employer-sponsored plan. This coverage is temporary (generally 18 to 36 months) and you may have to pay the entire premium plus a 2 percent administrative charge. Get information on your coverage options and compare. Be aware of the deadlines for deciding on coverage and find out when your new coverage will be effective.

10. Plan For Retirement

Before you retire, find out what health benefits, if any, extend to you and your spouse during your retirement years. Consult with your employer´s human resources office, your union, or the plan administrator. Check your SPD and other plan documents. Make sure there is no conflicting information among these sources about the benefits you will receive or the circumstances under which they can change or be eliminated. With this information in hand, you can make other important choices, like finding out if you are eligible for Medicare and Medigap insurance coverage. If you want to retire before you are eligible for Medicare and your employer does not provide health benefits in retirement, consider what you will do for health coverage. Your options may include enrolling in a spouse’s employer plan or in a Marketplace plan or temporarily continuing your employer coverage by electing COBRA. Planning for retirement includes planning for your health coverage in retirement. To find out more, read Taking the Mystery Out of Retirement Planning.

These Laws Can Help

  • The Employee Retirement Income Security Act – Offers protection for inPiduals enrolled in retirement, health, and other benefit plans sponsored by private-sector employers, and provides rights to information and a claims and appeals process for participants to get benefits from their plans.
  • The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act – Creates the Health Insurance Marketplace and provides protections for employment-based health coverage, including extending dependent coverage of children to age 26; prohibiting preexisting condition exclusions and prohibiting lifetime and annual limits on essential health benefits.
  • The Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act – Contains provisions giving certain former employees, retirees, spouses, and dependent children the right to purchase temporary continuation of group health plan coverage at group rates in specific instances.
  • The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act – Allows employees, their spouses and their dependents to enroll in employer-provided health coverage regardless of open enrollment periods if they lose coverage or in the event of marriage, birth, adoption or placement for adoption. Also prohibits discrimination in health care coverage.
  • The Women´s Health and Cancer Rights Act – Offers protections for breast cancer patients who elect breast reconstruction in connection with a mastectomy.
  • The Newborns´ and Mothers´ Health Protection Act – Provides rules on minimum coverage for hospital lengths of stay following childbirth.
  • The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act – Prohibits discrimination in group health plan premiums based on genetic information. Also, generally prohibits group health plans from requesting genetic information or requiring genetic tests.
  • The Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act and the Mental Health Parity Act – Requires parity in financial requirements and treatment limitations for mental health and substance use benefits with those for medical and surgical benefits.
  • The Children´s Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act – Allows special enrollment in a group health plan if an employee or dependents lose coverage under CHIP or Medicaid or are eligible for premium assistance under those programs.

For More Information

Visit the Employee Benefits Security Administration’s Website to view the following publications. To order copies or to request assistance from a benefits advisor, contact EBSA electronically or call toll free 1-866-444-3272.

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it is all the more important that the public understand
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Newsof.org. Selected the top stories of the city of GUNNISON COLORADO. Political events, traffic accidents on highways, downtown events, neighborhoods and inside. Also researched local newspapers and social networks, as well as the site of City Hall. Crimes, are always subject to demand generally for information. Also the tragedies and disasters such as fires, floods, flooding, rain, hail and winds. Tags: Breaking News, GUNNISON COLORADO, City, Indoors, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday , Friday, Saturday, Sunday, Car, Crash, Elections, Beating, Accident, Crime, Police, Criminal, Police, Road, Highway Access, Elections, Party, Hail, Rain, Flood, Anniversary, Award, Month, Week End , Today, Yesterday, Female, Male, Family, Child, People.