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Ider man killed in wreck in Hammondville


HAMMONDVILLE, AL (WAFF) - A man was killed in a wreck in Hammondville on Thursday morning. It happened near Highway 117 at around 10:40 a.m. Randall G. Pell, 54, of Ider was killed when his 1994 Chevy overturned at the 13.1 mile marker. It appears that he ...

‘Restaurant Impossible’ Episode Guide (May 28): Big Jim’s Bama Q in Hammondville, AL


“The Writing on the Wall” (05/28/14) – Daniel is the owner and operator of a successful sawmill, and thought he would be able to run Big Jim’s Bama Q in Hammondville, Ala., when he purchased it ten months ago. But his inexperience and naiveness in ...

Food Network to debut DeKalb County barbecue episode tonight on 'Restaurant: Impossible'


HAMMONDVILLE, Alabama – Months have passed since celebrity chef Robert Irvine from the hit Food Network show "Restaurant: Impossible" spent $10,000 to turn around Big Jim's Bama Q in Hammondville. Tonight, fans of the small-town eatery near historic ...

Hammondville, Alabama Vacation Rentals


Hammondville, Alabama offers great vacation house rental and home rental-by-owner deals for the knowledgeable traveler. No matter what budget or level of comfort you seek in your holiday to Hammondville, AL, there's surely a great local vacation home ...



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Learn about obesity in children

How do I know if my child has a healthy weight?

young boy on scaleThe doctor will monitor the changes in height and weight of children in the course of time and can tell you if your child has a healthy weight. During regular checkups, be sure to talk to your doctor about your childs weight.

Your childs doctor may ask about:

  • The feeding habits of your child
  • If you know places where to buy healthy food for children
  • How much physical activity the child
  • If there are certain places where your child can run and play
  • Much time your child spends each day in front of screens (watching TV, playing video games or at the computer, phone or tablet, such as iPad)
  • Any health problems your child has
  • The medical history of your family

What is BMI and what are the percentiles of BMI?

To find out if your child is in a healthy weight range, your doctor may use a measure called BMI or "body mass index". BMI is based on height and weight of your child measure. The BMI helps the doctor estimate how much body fat your child. The doctor can use BMI to see if your child has an appropriate weight for your height. A healthy BMI is different between girls and boys and varies by age.

Your doctor can compare your child´s BMI values ??typical of children of the same sex and age BMI. For that, doctors may use what is called "BMI percentile". This can help the doctor determine if your child is underweight, healthy weight, overweight or obese.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of Diseases, CDC, for its acronym in English), it is considered that a child has:

  • A healthy weight if your BMI is between the 5th percentile and 85th
  • Overweight if their BMI is between the 85th percentile and 95 º
  • Obese if their BMI is in the 95th percentile or higher

Talk with your child´s doctor about what BMI means your child.

Obesity: the 95th percentile upwards Overweight: 85th percentile to less than 95 Healthy Weight: 5th percentile to the 85th Underweight: below the 5th percentile

To calculate BMI and BMI percentile your child visit http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/dnpabmi/ (available in English)

What health problems can cause a child being overweight or obese?

Children who are overweight or obese are more likely to be overweight or obese as adults. Also more likely to develop serious health problems, such as:

  • High blood sugar or diabetes
  • High Blood Pressure
  • Cholesterol (a type of blood fat) high
  • Sleep apnea (a condition in which a person stops breathing for short periods during sleep)
  • Heart problems (such as heart attack or heart failure) or stroke in adulthood
  • Increased pressure on bones and joints, which can cause problems in childhood and in adulthood, joints and bones
  • Disease Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (disease caused by excess fat in the liver)
  • Low self-esteem or depression
  • Eating disorders such as binging and purging food

In the U.S., 1 in 3 children are overweight or obese.

What can cause a child to become overweight or obese?

Many things can cause a child to become overweight or obese; for instance:

  • Unhealthy eating habits . Children may overeat, eat many foods that are not healthy or take too many sugary drinks.
  • Not getting enough sleep . Children who do not sleep long enough each night are more likely to be overweight.
  • Family history . Children in families with overweight may be more likely to develop it. That may be due to the child´s genes or eating habits that are learned in the family.
  • Lack of sufficient physical activity . It is possible that children do not carry enough physical activity.Children should be active for at least 1 hour each day.
  • Too much time in front of screens . Children can spend too much time each day in front of screens.Some children eat while watching TV or playing on the computer.
  • Environment . Children may spend time in an environment (such as with family or friends, at daycare or school) where they have access to healthy food choices and opportunities for physical activity.

How to prevent your child from becoming overweight or obese

How I can prevent my child from becoming overweight or obese?

To help prevent your child from becoming overweight or obese, make sure you eat healthy and be active. There are many things you can do at home, at school and in the community to help children maintain a healthy weight.Here are some examples of each is.

At home

There are many things families can do at home. Some examples are:

Eat healthily
  • Prepare healthy meals at home with components of each food group.
    • The food groups include fruits, vegetables, grains, protein foods (meat, eggs, fish, "tofu" or tofu and beans) and low-fat dairy products or fat.
  • Make sure you eat a healthy breakfast every day.
  • Eat at the table with the family, rather than in front of a screen (TV, computer, cell phone or tablet).
  • Limit or avoid having drinks and foods that are not healthy at home.
    • Replace unhealthy snacks such as cookies, candy or chips in bag, healthy snacks such as fruits and vegetables.
    • Replace unhealthy sugary drinks such as soda, sports drinks or juices for healthy drinks such as water and low fat milk or fat.
  • Whenever you can, eat at home instead of in restaurants. At home, you are more likely to limit the amount of fat, sugar and salt in their food.
  • Make sure you eat the right amount of food.
For more information about healthy foods, the right amounts and sample menus, visithttp://choosemyplate.gov/en-espanol.html
Stay physically active
  • Give your child a chance to run and play for at least 1 hour a day.
  • Organize fun activities like biking, walking to the park, playing ball or swimming.
  • Encourage the whole family to stay active throughout the day.
    • For example, use the stairs instead of the elevator and go to places to walk or bike instead of going by car or bus.
  • Limit the time you spend in front of screens every day.
  • In addition to being physically active, make sure your child gets enough sleep each night.

Let´s Go! (Come on!) is a program to prevent children from becoming obese. The program is based on healthy eating and physical activity. Let´s Go! recommends healthy habits "5-2-1-0" for each day:

  • 5 fruits and vegetables
  • 2 hours or less of screen time for fun
  • 1 hour or more of physical activity
  • 0 sugary drinks

Let´s Go also recommends keeping the TV and computers out of the bedroom of the child and not allowing screen time for children under 2 years.

Let´s Go is a program of the State of Maine also provides resources to communities in other states.

These images and messages are adapted from Let´s Go on www.letsgo.org   (available in English only)

Let´s Go also has resources for schools to help children to eat healthy and be physically active. For more information and a packet of resources for your school, visit www.letsgo.org / toolkits .   Certain pages package resources are available in Spanish.

To find out what is making your child´s school to help prevent children are overweight or become obese, talk to the principal, the school nurse or school counselor your child. You can also ask how to participate in the Parent Teacher Association (PTA, for its acronym in English) or Parent Teacher Organization (PTO, for its acronym in English).

children at play

In school

In addition to eating healthily and be physically active at home, school programs can help children maintain a healthy weight. School programs can include activities such as:

  • Lessons about the importance of healthy eating and physical activity.
  • Information sessions for parents to learn ways to help your child maintain a healthy weight.
  • Healthy options for breakfast and lunch in the cafeteria, with appropriate portion sizes.
  • Healthy snacks and drinks in vending machines and at parties and events.
  • Water Dispensers with filters, to promote the use of drinking water instead of soda or sports drinks.
  • Groups led by adults to go to school on foot or by bicycle.
  • A longer period of physical education, in which children are physically active.
  • Fitness equipment such as balls and jump ropes for use at recess.

In the community

In addition to home and school, they can also make changes in the community to help children maintain a healthy weight. Communities and community centers can:

  • Improve parks, sidewalks and bike paths to ride in the community.
  • Take steps to parks, sidewalks and bike paths to be safe.
  • Promote community events such as health fairs, walks 5 kilometers (5K), sporting events at local parks, community gardens programs and local farmers markets. This can be done through posters, local newspapers and radio stations and local television.
  • Offer programs where families can receive advice on healthy eating and physical activity.

Girls on bikes

For other resources that can help your child maintain a healthy weight, visit:

For more information to improve parks, sidewalks and bike paths to ride in your area, contact your local department of parks and recreation.

For more information about events or programs in your community, contact your local community and recreation centers (such as the YMCA, the Boys and Girls Club or the local religious community centers).

What researchers found on measures that can be taken at home, school and community to prevent children are overweight or become obese?

Healthy eating and physical activity are very important to prevent children are overweight or become obese.

The researchers found that:

  • School programs to help children to eat healthily and being physically active can help prevent becoming overweight or become obese.
  • In conjunction with the curriculum, they can be useful also other measures taken at home and in the community.
  • More research is needed to find out what programs or measures are most effective.

Talking to your child´s doctor, school officials and community centers

Examples of questions to ask your child

  • Is my child a healthy weight?
  • What are the most important things I do at home to help my child maintain a healthy weight?
  • How I can get my child to eat healthy foods?
  • How much of each type of food should my child eat?
  • How much physical activity does my child need each day?
  • What are the best types of physical activity for my child?
  • How long should I allow my child pass in front of screens every day?
  • How long should my child sleep every night?
  • Do you have resources that can help me keep my child at a healthy weight?
  • Are you of community resources that can help you know?
  • If I have no grocery stores nearby or healthy foods are expensive for me, do you know resources that can help?
  • If there is a safe place for my child out to play, how I can help you stay active?

Sample questions for the principal, school nurse or your child´s counselor

  • Does the school offer programs to help prevent children are overweight or become obese? If not, how could we start one?
  • In the cafeteria and vending machines? Healthy foods like fruits and vegetables are offered instead of sugary drinks and salty or fatty foods?
  • How long will my child for physical activities is given in physical education class, at recess or during the day?
  • Do you use once school physical education as punishment or other physical activities?
  • Do you have programs for group walks or go to school groups for cycling to school guided by adults or other physical activity programs for children?
  • Is there information sessions that you can attend to learn more about how to help my child maintain a healthy weight?
  • What can I do at home to help reinforce what is taught in school about healthy eating and physical activity?
  • Are you of community resources that can help you know?

Examples of questions to their local community or recreation centers

  • Do you have resources or programs on healthy eating and physical activity for children?
  • Do you have a calendar of community events that include activities such as health fairs, walks 5 kilometers (5K) and sporting events at local parks?
  • Do you have a list of community gardens or local farmers markets?
  • Do you know of programs that can guide me to help my family eat healthy and be physically active?

Source

The information in this summary comes from the report Childhood Obesity Prevention Programs: Comparative Effectiveness Review and Meta-Analysis, (Programs to prevent childhood obesity: A review of comparative efficacy and meta-analysis)., June 2013 The report was produced by the Johns Hopkins University Evidence-based Practice Center (Centre for Evidence-Based Practice at Johns Hopkins) with funding from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality in Health Care, AHRQ, for its acronym in English).

Additional information MedlinePlus website was obtained ® , a service of the National Library of Medicine (National Library of Medicine) and the National Institutes of Health (National Institutes of Health) of the United States. This page is available at www.nlm.nih.gov / medlineplus / spanish .

This summary was prepared by the John M. Eisenberg Center for Clinical Decisions and Communications Science (John M. Eisenberg Center for Science Communications and Clinical Decision) at Baylor College of Medicine (Baylor College of Medicine) in Houston, Texas. It was written by Amelia Williamson Smith, MS, Jason A. Mendoza, MD, MPH, and Michael Fordis, MD This summary was reviewed by parents of children aged 2 to 18 years old.

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To protect students at career colleges from becoming burdened by student loan debt they cannot repay !

 These regulations will hold career training programs accountable for putting their students on the path to success, and they complement action across the Administration to protect consumers and prevent and investigate fraud, waste and abuse, particularly at for-profit colleges.

"Career colleges must be a stepping stone to the middle class. But too many hard-working students find themselves buried in debt with little to show for it. That is simply unacceptable," U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said. "These regulations are a necessary step to ensure that colleges accepting federal funds protect students, cut costs and improve outcomes. We will continue to take action as needed."

To qualify for federal student aid, the law requires that most for-profit programs and certificate programs at private non-profit and public institutions prepare students for "gainful employment in a recognized occupation." Under the regulations finalized today, a program would be considered to lead to gainful employment if the estimated annual loan payment of a typical graduate does not exceed 20 percent of his or her discretionary income or 8 percent of his or her total earnings. Programs that exceed these levels would be at risk of losing their ability to participate in taxpayer-funded federal student aid programs.

The final gainful employment regulations follow an extensive rulemaking process involving public hearings, negotiations and about 95,000 public comments. The regulations, which will go into effect on July 1, 2015, reflect the feedback the Department received, and aim to protect Americans from poor career training programs by targeting those programs that leave students buried in debt with few opportunities to repay it. Highlights of the rule include:

  • Preventing students from being buried in debt: Based on available data, the Department estimates that about 1,400 programs serving 840,000 students—of whom 99 percent are at for-profit institutions—would not pass the accountability standards. All programs will have the opportunity to make immediate changes that could help them avoid sanctions, but if these programs do not improve, they will ultimately become ineligible for federal student aid—which often makes up nearly 90 percent of the revenue at for-profit institutions.
  • More rigorous accountability than previous regulations: The new regulations are tougher than the Department's 2011 rules because they set a higher passing requirement and lay out a shorter path to ineligibility for the poorest-performing programs. In 2012, the Department estimated that 193 programs would not have passed the previous regulations; with respect to these new regulations, based on available data, the Department estimates that about 1,400 programs would not pass the accountability metric.
  • Providing transparency about student success: The rule also provides useful information for all students and consumers by requiring institutions to provide important information about their programs, like what their former students are earning, their success at graduating, and the amount of debt they accumulated.
  • Improving student outcomes: The regulations build on momentum toward increased accountability in higher education by setting standards for career training programs, including programs offered by for-profit institutions, to ensure they are serving students well. While the Department has seen encouraging changes in the past five years, it believes all career training programs can and should meet higher expectations.

Today, the Department is also taking new steps to formalize partnerships with several federal agencies to enhance cooperation and ensure proper oversight of for-profit institutions of higher education through an interagency task force.

Background on the Administration's efforts to protect students from poor-performing career colleges Too often, students at career colleges—including thousands of veterans—are charged excessive costs, but don't get the education they paid for. Instead, students in such programs are provided with poor quality training, often for low-wage jobs or in occupations where there are simply no job opportunities. They find themselves with large amounts of debt and, too often, end up in default. In many cases, students are drawn into these programs with confusing or misleading information.

The situation for students at for-profit institutions is particularly troubling. On average, attending a two-year for-profit institution costs a student four times as much as attending a community college. More than 80 percent of students at for-profits borrow, while less than half of students at public institutions do. Ultimately, students at for-profit colleges represent only about 11 percent of the total higher education population but 44 percent of all federal student loan defaults.

In response to these concerns, in 2009, the Department began extensive conversations with the higher education community about the role of career colleges, particularly on how they could be held accountable for the outcomes of their students. Following a 2012 court decision, which affirmed the U.S. Department of Education's authority to regulate in this area in order to protect students and taxpayers, the Department undertook new efforts to make sure career training programs provide affordable pathways to good jobs.

The Department believes many institutions have already started to take steps to improve. Some of the largest institutions have instituted trial periods for programs before students have to commit, so students can decide if that program is right for them. There are reports that institutions have decreased program lengths. Some are reducing costs. And a few institutions have closed some locations and programs they judge to be performing poorly.

But the Department also believes there is still potential for improvement in many of these programs—public, private non-profit and for-profit—so it is taking action to spur more change.

The gainful employment regulations are a central part of the Administration's work to ensure that student debt is affordable and that for-profit colleges serve students well. These regulations complement other efforts taken by the Administration to protect students by addressing problems at poor performing institutions, particularly in the for-profit sector. These efforts include:

  • Formalizing an interagency oversight task force The Department will lead an effort to formalize an interagency task force to help ensure proper oversight of for-profit institutions of higher education. In particular, the Department and other federal and state agencies will coordinate their activities and promote information sharing to protect students from unfair, deceptive, and abusive policies and practices. The task force will build on efforts already underway among various federal agencies, and include the Departments of Justice, Treasury and Veterans Affairs, as well as the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, Federal Trade Commission, and the Securities and Exchange Commission. In addition, state attorneys general will also be invited to continue their participation in this collaboration. Given the important responsibilities each of these federal agencies has, and the vital role that states play, the agencies will leverage their resources and expertise to assist one another, thereby making the best use of scarce resources and better protecting the interests of students and taxpayers. This task force will formalize and strengthen a working group that has been working together over the past year and that has coordinated efforts in several reviews and investigatory work. The task force will meet as needed, but at least once each quarter.

  • Keeping student debt affordable The Department is helping more students manage their student debt through flexible repayment options like the Pay As You Earn plan, which caps student loan payments at 10 percent of a borrower's discretionary income. In addition, the Administration continues targeted outreach to help borrowers who may be struggling to repay their loans, ensuring that they have the information they need to select the best repayment option for them and avoid future default.

  • Developing a college ratings system The Department is also working on a new college ratings system, which will showcase colleges and universities that are effective in improving student success; incentivize institutions to work toward the most important goals, like graduating low-income students and holding down costs; and help students and families choose their school based on the value it provides for their investment.

  • Strengthening oversight of the programs on which our nation's service members and veterans rely Through Executive Order 13607, the Principles of Excellence for Educational Institutions Serving Service Members, Veterans, Spouses, and Other Family Members, the Administration has worked to protect our nation's military families by ensuring that federal military and veterans educational benefits programs are providing service members, veterans, spouses, and other family members with the information, support, and protections they deserve. This includes: establishing a centralized complaint system; new, risk-based program reviews informed by students complaints to focus enforcement efforts at the Departments of Veterans Affairs, Defense, Education and Justice, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, and the Federal Trade Commission; and key tools and resources like the online GI Bill ® Comparison Tool, which has made it easier for over 450,000 veterans, service members and their dependents to select education and training programs that provide a good value and meet their needs.




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