HUNTINGTON INDIANA NEWS AND BLOG


Latest News - HUNTINGTON INDIANA

1/24 Local College Basketball Recap


(Recap written by Huntington University Athletics Media Relations) IN Tech men see second-half surge fall short in WHAC Loss The Indiana Tech men’s basketball team had a balanced attack, a strong second half and shot nearly 50 percent from the field ...

C. Dea Hethcote


Dea was a former resident of North Manchester, Indiana. He was born on March 14, 1937 at Parks Farm in Huntington County, Indiana to Hurshel Hethcote and Anna (Butler) Hethcote. He graduated from Andrews High School in Huntington County in 1955.

Looking for bald eagles?


It happens every winter. As lakes and rivers freeze in northeast Indiana, bald eagles gather at the Salamonie, Mississinewa and Huntington reservoirs for the winter. The churning water released at the bottom of the dams keeps the water ice-free and gives ...

Ann Louise Barentine


Ann Louise Barentine, 57 of Tipton, died at 2:08 p.m. Tuesday, January 20, 2015 at her residence. She was born March 31, 1957 in Huntington, Indiana. She was a member of the Kemp United Methodist Church. Ann is survived by her father, Robert M. Jay Sr.;

Inside INdiana Business


Indiana study abroad programs among nation's best Several ...
The company provides cleaning and disaster restoration services. Huntington University projects receive funding Huntington University has received two grants from the Huntington County Community ...

Huntington University Projects Receive Funding


Founded in 1897 by the Church of the United Brethren in Christ, Huntington University is located on a contemporary, lakeside campus in northeast Indiana. The university is a member of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU).

Huntington Bancshares Incorporated Declares Quarterly Cash Dividend On Its Series A And B Preferred Stocks


The principal markets for these services are Huntington's six-state retail banking franchise: Ohio, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Indiana, West Virginia, and Kentucky. The primary distribution channels include a banking network of more than 700 traditional ...

GW part of large WSAZ field


Pennsylvania and Indiana. This year’s field looks to be particularly deep, with seven of the top 10 Class AAA teams, including top-ranked Parkersburg South, second-ranked Huntington, No. 4 Cabell Midland, fifth-ranked Ripley and No. 6 George Washington ...

Vectren : Gas pipeline upgrades to begin in Huntington


We urge residents and their children to keep a safe distance away from any work zones. Huntington is one of nearly 75 cities in Indiana undergoing this type of pipeline replacement. Since 2008, more than 250 miles of gas mains have been replaced in the ...

Get to know UK softball's Erin Rethlake


Florida A&M. A true freshman from Huntington, Indiana, Erin Rethlake had a dazzling high school career at Huntington North High School. The left-handed pitcher won numerous awards in high school, including 2014 News-Sentinel Softball Player of the Year ...




SPECIAL INFORMATION FOR HUNTINGTON

How I can eat a healthy diet?

The body needs minerals, vitamins and other nutrients to stay healthy. A healthy diet means you are eating:


  • Vegetables, fruits, whole grains and non-fat dairy and low-fat
  • Fish, seafood, chicken or turkey, lean meats and low-fat, eggs, beans, peas (peas), seeds and nuts


    Limit your intake of foods rich in:


  • Cholesterol, sodium (salt) and added sugar.
  • Fat trans: fats trans can be found in foods such as cakes (or cakes), cookies, margarine that comes in bars and fried foods.
  • Saturated fats: These fats are in animal products such as cheese, high-fat meats, whole milk and butter.
  • Refined grains: refined grain products include white bread, pasta, white rice and flour tortillas, among others.


    Get a personalized diet plan to help you choose healthy foods



    Having too much cholesterol in the blood can cause heart disease or heart attack. Approximately one in six people in the United States have high cholesterol. You may have high cholesterol and not know it. Good thing its easy to get tested for cholesterol, and if you go too high, you can take steps to control it.


    Who should be tested for cholesterol?


  • Men who are 35 or more
  • Men under 35 who have heart disease or are at risk of suffering from
  • Women who have heart disease or are at risk of suffering from


    [8]

    HUNTINGTON INDIANA tspan:3m HUNTINGTON INDIANA




    Avoiding job scams in HUNTINGTON

    Scammers know that finding a job can be tough. To trick people looking for honest work, scammers advertise where real employers and job placement firms do. They also make upbeat promises about your chances of employment, and virtually all of them ask you to pay them for their services before you get a job. But the promise of a job isn’t the same thing as a job. If you have to pay for the promise, it’s likely a scam.

    Signs of a Job Scam

    Scammers advertise jobs where legitimate employers do — online, in newspapers, and even on TV and radio. Here’s how to tell whether a job lead may be a scam:

    You need to pay to get the job

    They may say they’ve got a job waiting, or guarantee to place you in a job, if you just pay a fee for certification, training materials, or their expenses placing you with a company. But after you pay, the job doesn’t materialize. Employers and employment firms shouldn’t ask you to pay for the promise of a job.

    You need to supply your credit card or bank account information

    Don´t give out your credit card or bank account information over the phone to a company unless you´re familiar with them and have agreed to pay for something. Anyone who has your account information can use it.

    The ad is for "previously undisclosed" federal government jobs

    Information about available federal jobs is free. And all federal positions are announced to the public on usajobs.gov. Don’t believe anyone who promises you a federal or postal job.

    Job Placement Services

    Many job placement services are legitimate. But others lie about what they’ll do for you, promote outdated or fake job openings, or charge up-front fees for services that may not lead to a job. In fact, they might not even return your calls once you pay.

    Before you enlist a company’s help:

    Check with the hiring company

    If a company or organization is mentioned in an ad or interview, contact that company to find out if the company really is hiring through the service.

    Get details — in writing

    What’s the cost, what will you get, and who pays — you or the company that hires you? What happens if the service doesn’t find a job for you or any real leads? If they’re reluctant to answer your questions, or give confusing answers, you should be reluctant to work with them.

    Get a copy of the contract with the placement firm, and read it carefully. A legitimate company will give you time to read the contract and decide, not pressure you into signing then and there. Make sure any promises — including refund promises — are in writing. Some listing services and "consultants" write ads to sound like jobs, but that’s just a marketing trick: They´re really selling general information about getting a job — information you can find for free on your own.

    Know whether it’s job placement or job counseling

    Executive or career counseling services help people with career directions and decisions. They may offer services like skills identification and self-evaluation, resume preparation, letter writing, and interview techniques, and general information about companies or organizations in a particular location or job field.

    But job placement isn’t guaranteed. Fees can be as high as thousands of dollars, and you often have to pay first.

    The National Career Development Association (NCDA) offers some tips on finding and choosing a career counselor, and explains the different types of counselors active in the field.

    Check for complaints

    Your local consumer protection agency, state Attorney General´s Office, and the Better Business Bureau can tell you whether any complaints have been filed about a company. Just keep in mind that a lack of complaints doesn’t mean the business is on the up-and-up. You may want to do an internet search with the name of the company and words like review, scam, or complaint. Look through several pages of search results. And check out articles about the company in newspapers, magazines, or online, as well.

    Where to Look for Jobs

    You’ve read the many resume and interview tips from respected sources available for free online, and scoured online job boards and newspaper classifieds. Some other places to look for leads in your job search include:

    CareerOneStop

    Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor, CareerOneStop lists hundreds of thousands of jobs. It also links to employment and training programs in each state, including programs for people with disabilities, minorities, older workers, veterans, welfare recipients, and young people. For federal jobs, all open federal positions are announced to the public on usajobs.gov.

    State and county offices

    Your state’s Department of Labor may have job listings or be able to point you to local job offices that offer counseling and referrals. Local and county human resources offices provide some placement assistance, too. They can give you the names of other groups that may be helpful, such as labor unions or federally-funded vocational programs.

    College career service offices

    Whether it’s a four-year university or community college, see what help yours can offer. If you’re not a current or former student, some still may let you look at their job listings.

    Your library

    Ask if they can point you to information on writing a resume, interviewing, or compiling a list of companies and organizations to contact about job openings.

    Report a Job Scam

    If you’ve been targeted by a job scam, file a complaint with the FTC.

    For problems with an employment-service firm, contact the appropriate state licensing board (if these firms must be licensed in your state), your state Attorney General, and your local consumer protection agency.

    To learn about credit and background checks when you’re looking for a job, read What to Know When You Look For a Job.

    [7]



  • Avoiding job scams in HUNTINGTON

    Scammers know that finding a job can be tough. To trick people looking for honest work, scammers advertise where real employers and job placement firms do. They also make upbeat promises about your chances of employment, and virtually all of them ask you to pay them for their services before you get a job. But the promise of a job isn’t the same thing as a job. If you have to pay for the promise, it’s likely a scam.

    Signs of a Job Scam

    Scammers advertise jobs where legitimate employers do — online, in newspapers, and even on TV and radio. Here’s how to tell whether a job lead may be a scam:

    You need to pay to get the job

    They may say they’ve got a job waiting, or guarantee to place you in a job, if you just pay a fee for certification, training materials, or their expenses placing you with a company. But after you pay, the job doesn’t materialize. Employers and employment firms shouldn’t ask you to pay for the promise of a job.

    You need to supply your credit card or bank account information

    Don´t give out your credit card or bank account information over the phone to a company unless you´re familiar with them and have agreed to pay for something. Anyone who has your account information can use it.

    The ad is for "previously undisclosed" federal government jobs

    Information about available federal jobs is free. And all federal positions are announced to the public on usajobs.gov. Don’t believe anyone who promises you a federal or postal job.

    Job Placement Services

    Many job placement services are legitimate. But others lie about what they’ll do for you, promote outdated or fake job openings, or charge up-front fees for services that may not lead to a job. In fact, they might not even return your calls once you pay.

    Before you enlist a company’s help:

    Check with the hiring company

    If a company or organization is mentioned in an ad or interview, contact that company to find out if the company really is hiring through the service.

    Get details — in writing

    What’s the cost, what will you get, and who pays — you or the company that hires you? What happens if the service doesn’t find a job for you or any real leads? If they’re reluctant to answer your questions, or give confusing answers, you should be reluctant to work with them.

    Get a copy of the contract with the placement firm, and read it carefully. A legitimate company will give you time to read the contract and decide, not pressure you into signing then and there. Make sure any promises — including refund promises — are in writing. Some listing services and "consultants" write ads to sound like jobs, but that’s just a marketing trick: They´re really selling general information about getting a job — information you can find for free on your own.

    Know whether it’s job placement or job counseling

    Executive or career counseling services help people with career directions and decisions. They may offer services like skills identification and self-evaluation, resume preparation, letter writing, and interview techniques, and general information about companies or organizations in a particular location or job field.

    But job placement isn’t guaranteed. Fees can be as high as thousands of dollars, and you often have to pay first.

    The National Career Development Association (NCDA) offers some tips on finding and choosing a career counselor, and explains the different types of counselors active in the field.

    Check for complaints

    Your local consumer protection agency, state Attorney General´s Office, and the Better Business Bureau can tell you whether any complaints have been filed about a company. Just keep in mind that a lack of complaints doesn’t mean the business is on the up-and-up. You may want to do an internet search with the name of the company and words like review, scam, or complaint. Look through several pages of search results. And check out articles about the company in newspapers, magazines, or online, as well.

    Where to Look for Jobs

    You’ve read the many resume and interview tips from respected sources available for free online, and scoured online job boards and newspaper classifieds. Some other places to look for leads in your job search include:

    CareerOneStop

    Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor, CareerOneStop lists hundreds of thousands of jobs. It also links to employment and training programs in each state, including programs for people with disabilities, minorities, older workers, veterans, welfare recipients, and young people. For federal jobs, all open federal positions are announced to the public on usajobs.gov.

    State and county offices

    Your state’s Department of Labor may have job listings or be able to point you to local job offices that offer counseling and referrals. Local and county human resources offices provide some placement assistance, too. They can give you the names of other groups that may be helpful, such as labor unions or federally-funded vocational programs.

    College career service offices

    Whether it’s a four-year university or community college, see what help yours can offer. If you’re not a current or former student, some still may let you look at their job listings.

    Your library

    Ask if they can point you to information on writing a resume, interviewing, or compiling a list of companies and organizations to contact about job openings.

    Report a Job Scam

    If you’ve been targeted by a job scam, file a complaint with the FTC.

    For problems with an employment-service firm, contact the appropriate state licensing board (if these firms must be licensed in your state), your state Attorney General, and your local consumer protection agency.

    To learn about credit and background checks when you’re looking for a job, read What to Know When You Look For a Job.

    [7]






    We selected HUNTINGTON INDIANA LAST NEWS AND IMPORTANT ISSUES. Share!

    Feed Widget


    If people in the media cannot decide whether they are in the
    business of reporting news or manufacturing propaganda,
    it is all the more important that the public understand
    that difference,and choose their news sources accordingly.
    Thomas Sowell

    Newsof.org. Selected the top stories of the city of HUNTINGTON INDIANA. Political events, traffic accidents on highways, downtown events, neighborhoods and inside. Also researched local newspapers and social networks, as well as the site of City Hall. Crimes, are always subject to demand generally for information. Also the tragedies and disasters such as fires, floods, flooding, rain, hail and winds. Tags: Breaking News, HUNTINGTON INDIANA, City, Indoors, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday , Friday, Saturday, Sunday, Car, Crash, Elections, Beating, Accident, Crime, Police, Criminal, Police, Road, Highway Access, Elections, Party, Hail, Rain, Flood, Anniversary, Award, Month, Week End , Today, Yesterday, Female, Male, Family, Child, People.