IVALEE ALABAMA
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Steele man killed in Friday morning wreck


STEELE, Alabama -- A 74-year-old man was killed Friday morning in a wreck on U.S. 11 ...
"It appears something medical happened to him to cause the accident," Head said. Ivalee and Attalla firefighters, Alabama State Troopers and the Etowah County ...

Red Ribbon Week continues at Etowah County schools


Red Ribbon Week is underway in Etowah County ...
The Etowah County Sheriff's Office helicopter, armored vehicle, motorcycles and mounted unit were at Ivalee Elementary, John Jones Elementary, and West End Elementary Schools Tuesday. They also visit ...

Students to Stewards helps education


Twenty-five schools and nonprofit organizations across the state will receive conservation education grants through the Alabama Power Foundation’s “Students to Stewards” program. The three grant winners in Etowah County are Ivalee Elementary School ...

Kenneth R. Clement


Alabama; Ivalee Baptist church, Attalla, Alabama; and Tate’s Chapel Baptist Church, Centre, Alabama) spanning over 38 years before becoming director of missions at DeKalb Baptist Association for the last 11 years. A native of Gadsden, Alabama ...

Ivalee students, staff, volunteers construct outdoor classroom


The Alabama Wildlife Federation provided a $910 grant, and April Waltz, conservation education specialist with AWF, has provided technical assistance to design the classroom site and help plan it. Now Ivalee is enrolled in the Alabama Outdoor Classroom ...

Teen Mom Arrested After 2-Year-Old Son Found Alone With Her Suicide Note


ETOWAH COUNTY, AL – An 18-year-old mother reported missing Saturday was later found in the woods and arrested after her 2-year-old son was discovered by a family member outside a home in the Ivalee area. The toddler was alone, holding a suicide note ...

Missing Etowah County teen found (updated)


GADSDEN, Alabama -- The Etowah County Sheriff's Office says a missing 18-year-old woman in the Ivalee area has been found. Shortly before 3:30 p.m., authorities announced they had found Katie Renea Halbert safe and unharmed. She had been missing since ...

James Neal McCord Sr.


In between pastorates, he served as Sunday school director for Saint Clair Baptist Association and taught Master Life for the Alabama Baptist and was one of the first 1,000 to be certified to teach the course. Jim is survived by his wife of 53 years ...

YVONEE FRANCES HOLT,


83, of Blountsville, died Jan. 17, 2011, at St. Vincent’s Blount in Oneonta. An Alabama native, she was the daughter of the late Wesley and Coye Timmerman Bryant. Her husband Clark Holt and a brother also predeceased her. She was a member of Royal Advent ...

Ivalee, Alabama Vacation Rentals


Ivalee, Alabama offers great vacation house rental and home rental-by-owner deals for the knowledgeable traveler. No matter what budget or level of comfort you seek in your holiday to Ivalee, AL, there's surely a great local vacation home rental available ...

Swan song at Jack Coffey Marsh


It's not clear how the swans felt about all the excitement at Coffey Marsh just north of Promise City Wednesday afternoon --- they're laid-back big birds. But the 80 or so humans present had a wonderf…




SPECIAL INFORMATION FOR IVALEE

Giving Every Young Person in IVALEE ALABAMA a Path to Reach Their Potential

Our nation’s most basic duty is to ensure that every child has the chance to fulfill his or her potential. This isn’t the responsibility of one individual or one neighborhood: it’s up to all of us to pave these paths of opportunity so that young people — regardless of where they grow up — can get ahead in life and achieve their dreams.

That’s why My Brother’s Keeper (MBK) is such an important initiative. Launched by President Obama last year, MBK brings communities together to ensure that all youth — including boys and young men of color — can overcome barriers to success and improve their lives. I got to see this work up close during a recent trip to Oakland, California. I joined Mayor Libby Schaaf, City Council President Lynette McElhaney, and other stakeholders for a conversation about efforts that are making a difference in the lives of local youth.

One of the participants was a teenager named Edwin Manzano. The son of a hard-working single parent, Edwin found encouragement and support at the East Oakland Youth Development Center (EOYDC). Thanks in part to the academic and mentoring services offered by the EOYDC, Edwin will become the first member of his family to attend college when he begins his studies this fall at San Francisco State University.

Edwin is grateful for the opportunities that EOYDC afforded him. “Everyone needs a support system,” he says. That’s true whether you are a teenager or HUD Secretary. I was lucky when I was growing up on the West Side of San Antonio. Although it was a modest community in terms of resources, it was rich with folks who took an interest in my future. I had family members, teachers — and even policymakers — who paved a path that allowed me and other young people like me to succeed.

Unfortunately, not every child is as fortunate. That’s why My Brother’s Keeper is so close to my heart. The future of every young person in America should be determined by their heart, their mind and their work ethic. It should never be determined by their zip code.

In Oakland, I talked with 17 young people who have big hopes and aspirations for the future. It’s in our nation’s interest to help them achieve their goals. And we’re committed to doing our part at HUD.

For example, we’ve introduced a Jobs-Plus pilot program that will provide public housing residents in eight cities with intensive employment training, rent incentives and community building focused on work and economic self-sufficiency.

We’re also working on a broadband initiative to ensure that students living in HUD-assisted households will benefit from the life-changing opportunities available through high-speed internet. This project will provide the access to online resources that young people need to succeed in the 21st century global economy.

On the housing front, we expect the recent expansion of our Rental Assistance Demonstration (RAD) initiative to aid HUD-assisted properties in raising billions of dollars in private sector investment — funding that will be used to secure our nation’s affordable housing future. And recently, our Federal Housing Administration lowered its Mortgage Insurance Premiums to make homeownership more affordable for responsible families, helping them put down roots and build wealth for the future.

But I know HUD alone won’t solve the issues facing America’s youth. These challenges require our Department to maintain longstanding, effective partnerships with other federal agencies and key stakeholders. Most importantly, President Obama understands that My Brother’s Keeper will only succeed if local leaders take his call to action into their own hands.

Folks in Oakland are stepping up to answer this call. During the Community Conversation, I spoke with leaders from Oakland’s nonprofits, philanthropic institutions, and faith-based organizations that are putting our young people on the path to success. Groups like the East Oakland Youth Development Center, the East Bay Foundation, and the Allen Temple Baptist Church are using promising and proven approaches to make a real difference in their communities.

This kind of work is happening all across the nation and will benefit generations of Americans. We’ve got to keep it going by continuing to support our young people. When they succeed, our nation grows stronger, and our future becomes brighter. And by giving everyone an opportunity to reach their goals, we can ensure that the 21st century is another American century.

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IVALEE ALABAMA tspan:3m IVALEE ALABAMA




Giving Every Young Person in IVALEE ALABAMA a Path to Reach Their Potential

Our nation’s most basic duty is to ensure that every child has the chance to fulfill his or her potential. This isn’t the responsibility of one individual or one neighborhood: it’s up to all of us to pave these paths of opportunity so that young people — regardless of where they grow up — can get ahead in life and achieve their dreams.

That’s why My Brother’s Keeper (MBK) is such an important initiative. Launched by President Obama last year, MBK brings communities together to ensure that all youth — including boys and young men of color — can overcome barriers to success and improve their lives. I got to see this work up close during a recent trip to Oakland, California. I joined Mayor Libby Schaaf, City Council President Lynette McElhaney, and other stakeholders for a conversation about efforts that are making a difference in the lives of local youth.

One of the participants was a teenager named Edwin Manzano. The son of a hard-working single parent, Edwin found encouragement and support at the East Oakland Youth Development Center (EOYDC). Thanks in part to the academic and mentoring services offered by the EOYDC, Edwin will become the first member of his family to attend college when he begins his studies this fall at San Francisco State University.

Edwin is grateful for the opportunities that EOYDC afforded him. “Everyone needs a support system,” he says. That’s true whether you are a teenager or HUD Secretary. I was lucky when I was growing up on the West Side of San Antonio. Although it was a modest community in terms of resources, it was rich with folks who took an interest in my future. I had family members, teachers — and even policymakers — who paved a path that allowed me and other young people like me to succeed.

Unfortunately, not every child is as fortunate. That’s why My Brother’s Keeper is so close to my heart. The future of every young person in America should be determined by their heart, their mind and their work ethic. It should never be determined by their zip code.

In Oakland, I talked with 17 young people who have big hopes and aspirations for the future. It’s in our nation’s interest to help them achieve their goals. And we’re committed to doing our part at HUD.

For example, we’ve introduced a Jobs-Plus pilot program that will provide public housing residents in eight cities with intensive employment training, rent incentives and community building focused on work and economic self-sufficiency.

We’re also working on a broadband initiative to ensure that students living in HUD-assisted households will benefit from the life-changing opportunities available through high-speed internet. This project will provide the access to online resources that young people need to succeed in the 21st century global economy.

On the housing front, we expect the recent expansion of our Rental Assistance Demonstration (RAD) initiative to aid HUD-assisted properties in raising billions of dollars in private sector investment — funding that will be used to secure our nation’s affordable housing future. And recently, our Federal Housing Administration lowered its Mortgage Insurance Premiums to make homeownership more affordable for responsible families, helping them put down roots and build wealth for the future.

But I know HUD alone won’t solve the issues facing America’s youth. These challenges require our Department to maintain longstanding, effective partnerships with other federal agencies and key stakeholders. Most importantly, President Obama understands that My Brother’s Keeper will only succeed if local leaders take his call to action into their own hands.

Folks in Oakland are stepping up to answer this call. During the Community Conversation, I spoke with leaders from Oakland’s nonprofits, philanthropic institutions, and faith-based organizations that are putting our young people on the path to success. Groups like the East Oakland Youth Development Center, the East Bay Foundation, and the Allen Temple Baptist Church are using promising and proven approaches to make a real difference in their communities.

This kind of work is happening all across the nation and will benefit generations of Americans. We’ve got to keep it going by continuing to support our young people. When they succeed, our nation grows stronger, and our future becomes brighter. And by giving everyone an opportunity to reach their goals, we can ensure that the 21st century is another American century.

[25]



How can I follow Congressman votes that I have chosen in IVALEE ALABAMA

How to . . .   observe about congressional votes  All voting in Congress is a matter of public record. However, not all floor votes are roll call votes. There are voice votes (“aye” or “no”) and pision or standing votes (where the presiding officer counts Members), and these types of votes do not indicate by name how a member voted. Senate.gov

Senate roll call vote tallies are posted online within an hour of the vote.   You can view today´s votes or use the vote tables to look at any roll call vote taken since the 101st Congress (1989).  In addition to vote tallies, the entries also provide brief descriptions of the votes and links to Congress.gov for the texts of the legislation.

House.gov

House roll call vote tallies are posted online directly following the vote.   You can view votes from this Congress or use the archives to look at any roll call vote taken since the 101st Congress, 2nd session (1990).  In addition to vote tallies, the entries provide brief descriptions of the votes.

Congress.gov

Congress.gov provides Senate recorded floor votes going back to the 101st Congress (1989-90) and House recorded floor votes going back to the second session of the 101st Congress (1990). To access votes using Congress.gov search for a bill and click on the "Actions" tab. All House and Senate roll call votes will be listed with links to the House and Senate´s web pages.

Congressional Record

The Congressional Record is the official source of information on recorded floor votes.  Votes are printed in the daily Record as they occur on the floor. The votes provide an alphabetical listing of members under “yea,” “nay,” and “not voting” categories and show the overall tally for each category.  However, votes are not identified by party or by state. The Daily Digest section that is printed at the end of each Record shows how many roll call votes were taken that day and show on what page in the Record the votes can be found. TheCongressional Record Index provides subject access to the votes (under “Votes in Senate” and “Votes in House.”)

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