KIRTLAND NEWS AND BLOG


Latest News - KIRTLAND

Lake County land transfers


Brian Rowe sold a home at 164 Traymore Boulevard to Patricia A. Franklin for $52,000. Kirtland Patricia L. Soya sold a home at 10171 Hillcrest Drive to Carol A. and Edward J. Dolovacky-Bradac for $201,240. Ralph T. and Mary Ellen Carter sold a home at ...

Kirtland linebacker Matthew Finkler to sign with Bowling Green football


KIRTLAND, Ohio -- Kirtland two-way player Matthew Finkler will play linebacker for Bowling Green. The three-time Division VI state champion and 2013 Ohio Division VI Defensive Player of the Year picked the Falcons over Air Force, Buffalo and Miami (Ohio).

Timeline on religious freedom


Following is a timeline of statements and actions from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints regarding religious freedom and nondiscrimination: 1835: A general assembly of the Church held in Kirtland, Ohio, on Aug. 17 unanimously adopts a ...

AFRL opens quality of life fitness park


1/27/2015 - KIRTLAND AIR FORCE BASE, N.M. -- Air Force Research Laboratory workers have a new place for fitness activities, as the lab recently opened its quality of life fitness park. The park is located on the west side of Kirtland in an area called ...

KAFB to house more Osprey planes


Kirtland Air Force Base will temporarily house four additional CV-22 Ospreys, bringing the total number of the tilt-rotor aircraft based here to 11, officials said Monday. Jennifer Talhelm, communications director for Sen. Tom Udall, D-N.M., said the ...

Senators: 7 Ospreys to be temporarily based in NM


Senators Tom Udall and Martin Heinrich said Monday the decision to temporarily base the Ospreys at Cannon Air Force Base at Clovis and Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque demonstrate the value of the two installations. Ospreys are aircraft that can fly ...

Eleuthera students join protection of the Kirtland Warbler initiative


ELEUTHERA, The Bahamas -- Students throughout South Eleuthera were in for a wild treat last week, as Bahamas National Trust (BNT) Education Officer, Scott Johnson traveled across the island to teach them about the Kirtland’s Warbler. The Kirtland’s ...

Fracking paused on gas wells in Western Colorado


"We are looking at ways to save on costs," said WPX spokesman Jeff Kirtland. WPX employs 380 people in Colorado; the company hasn't announced any layoffs at this time. The stop to fracking is expected to have more of an employment effect on contractors and ...

Kirtland 15-year-old faces charges after allegedly crashing stolen van into senior center


FARMINGTON — A 15-year-old boy allegedly stole a van and crashed it into a Kirtland senior center on Thursday morning. Deputies responded at 9:19 a.m. after it was reported that a stolen van, belonging to the county, had crashed into a wall of the Lower ...

The Kirtland Temple


Every year tens of thousands of people visit the Kirtland Temple, dedicated in 1836 by what was then the Church of the Latter Day Saints. The vast majority of those visitors are members of the Utah-based Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and ...




SPECIAL INFORMATION FOR KIRTLAN

Warning in KIRTLAN: Government Grant Scams

“Because you pay your income taxes on time, you have been awarded a free $12,500 government grant! To get your grant, simply give us your checking account information, and we will direct-deposit the grant into your bank account!”

Sometimes, it’s an ad that claims you will qualify to receive a “free grant” to pay for education costs, home repairs, home business expenses, or unpaid bills. Other times, it’s a phone call supposedly from a “government” agency or some other organization with an official sounding name. In either case, the claim is the same: your application for a grant is guaranteed to be accepted, and you’ll never have to pay the money back.

But the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the nation’s consumer protection agency, says that “money for nothing” grant offers usually are scams, whether you see them in your local paper or a national magazine, or hear about them on the phone.

Some scam artists advertise “free grants” in the classifieds, inviting readers to call a toll-free number for more information. Others are more bold: they call you out of the blue. They lie about where they’re calling from, or they claim legitimacy using an official-sounding name like the “Federal Grants Administration.” They may ask you some basic questions to determine if you “qualify” to receive a grant. FTC attorneys say calls and come-ons for free money invariably are rip offs.

Grant scammers generally follow a script: they congratulate you on your eligibility, then ask for your checking account information so they can “deposit your grant directly into your account,” or cover a one-time “processing fee.” The caller may even reassure you that you can get a refund if you’re not satisfied. In fact, you’ll never see the grant they promise; they will disappear with your money.

The FTC says following a few basic rules can keep consumers from losing money to these “government grant” scams:

  • Don’t give out your bank account information to anyone you don’t know. Scammers pressure people to divulge their bank account information so that they can steal the money in the account. Always keep your bank account information confidential. Don’t share it unless you are familiar with the company and know why the information is necessary.
  • Don’t pay any money for a “free” government grant. If you have to pay money to claim a “free” government grant, it isn’t really free. A real government agency won’t ask you to pay a processing fee for a grant that you have already been awarded — or to pay for a list of grant-making institutions. The names of agencies and foundations that award grants are available for free at any public library or on the Internet. The only official access point for all federal grant-making agencies is www.grants.gov.
  • Look-alikes aren’t the real thing. Just because the caller says he’s from the “Federal Grants Administration” doesn’t mean that he is. There is no such government agency. Take a moment to check the blue pages in your telephone directory to bear out your hunch — or not.
  • Phone numbers can deceive. Some con artists use Internet technology to disguise their area code in caller ID systems. Although it may look like they’re calling from Washington, DC, they could be calling from anywhere in the world.
  • Take control of the calls you receive. If you want to reduce the number of telemarketing calls you receive, place your telephone number on the National Do Not Call Registry. To register online, visit donotcall.gov. To register by phone, call 1-888-382-1222 (TTY: 1-866-290-4236) from the phone number you wish to register.
  • File a complaint with the FTC. If you think you may have been a victim of a government grant scam, file a complaint with the FTC online, or call toll-free, 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357); TTY: 1-866-653-4261. The FTC enters Internet, telemarketing, identity theft, and other fraud-related complaints into Consumer Sentinel, a secure online database available to hundreds of civil and criminal law enforcement agencies in the U.S. and abroad.
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How I can eat a healthy diet?

The body needs minerals, vitamins and other nutrients to stay healthy. A healthy diet means you are eating:


  • Vegetables, fruits, whole grains and non-fat dairy and low-fat
  • Fish, seafood, chicken or turkey, lean meats and low-fat, eggs, beans, peas (peas), seeds and nuts


    Limit your intake of foods rich in:


  • Cholesterol, sodium (salt) and added sugar.
  • Fat trans: fats trans can be found in foods such as cakes (or cakes), cookies, margarine that comes in bars and fried foods.
  • Saturated fats: These fats are in animal products such as cheese, high-fat meats, whole milk and butter.
  • Refined grains: refined grain products include white bread, pasta, white rice and flour tortillas, among others.


    Get a personalized diet plan to help you choose healthy foods



    Having too much cholesterol in the blood can cause heart disease or heart attack. Approximately one in six people in the United States have high cholesterol. You may have high cholesterol and not know it. Good thing its easy to get tested for cholesterol, and if you go too high, you can take steps to control it.


    Who should be tested for cholesterol?


  • Men who are 35 or more
  • Men under 35 who have heart disease or are at risk of suffering from
  • Women who have heart disease or are at risk of suffering from


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  • How can consumers in KIRTLAN be sure a genetic test is valid and useful?

    Before undergoing genetic testing, it is important to be sure that the test is valid and useful. A genetic test is valid if it provides an accurate result. Two main measures of accuracy apply to genetic tests: analytical validity and clinical validity. Another measure of the quality of a genetic test is its usefulness, or clinical utility.

    • Analytical validity refers to how well the test predicts the presence or absence of a particular gene or genetic change. In other words, can the test accurately detect whether a specific genetic variant is present or absent?

    • Clinical validity refers to how well the genetic variant being analyzed is related to the presence, absence, or risk of a specific disease.

    • Clinical utility refers to whether the test can provide information about diagnosis, treatment, management, or prevention of a disease that will be helpful to a consumer.

    All laboratories that perform health-related testing, including genetic testing, are subject to federal regulatory standards called the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) or even stricter state requirements. CLIA standards cover how tests are performed, the qualifications of laboratory personnel, and quality control and testing procedures for each laboratory. By controlling the quality of laboratory practices, CLIA standards are designed to ensure the analytical validity of genetic tests.

    CLIA standards do not address the clinical validity or clinical utility of genetic tests. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requires information about clinical validity for some genetic tests. Additionally, the state of New York requires information on clinical validity for all laboratory tests performed for people living in that state. Consumers, health providers, and health insurance companies are often the ones who determine the clinical utility of a genetic test.

    It can be difficult to determine the quality of a genetic test sold directly to the public. Some providers of direct-to-consumer genetic tests are not CLIA-certified, so it can be difficult to tell whether their tests are valid. If providers of direct-to-consumer genetic tests offer easy-to-understand information about the scientific basis of their tests, it can help consumers make more informed decisions. It may also be helpful to discuss any concerns with a health professional before ordering a direct-to-consumer genetic test.

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