MOROCCO INDIANA NEWS AND BLOG


Latest News - MOROCCO INDIANA

Beat the winter blues by visiting Morocco's Antique Snowmobile Museum


What started out as a hobby for Dan Blaney turned into Indiana’s only antique snowmobile museum located behind his law office in Morocco. “I bought my first John Deere snowmobile in 1981 and I enjoyed messing around with it with my three daughters ...

Italian auto supplier chooses Indiana for new headquarters


“Indiana’s motor vehicle industry is prominent around the ...
With ten locations in Italy, as well as locations in India, China, Brazil and Morocco, the company is a worldwide supplier for original equipment manufacturers in the Fiat Chrysler Group ...

Morocco predicts economic rebound in 2015


Retired Galveston County Sheriff’s deputy Ricky Mitchell wasn’t the only Galveston County Daily News reader who felt the call to action after reading about a missing Galveston pit bull that was found alive and well in an Indiana animal shelter.

Marine, Senator join forces in push for Desert Storm memorial


Afghanistan, Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belgium, Canada, Czechoslovakia, Denmark, Egypt, France, Germany, Greece, Honduras, Hungary, Italy, Kuwait, Morocco ...
Joe Donnelly, D-Indiana, who introduced the legislation in the senate with ...

OMR Automotive Establishes North American headquarters In Speedway


It has 10 production sites in Italy and others in Brazil, Morocco, India and China. “Indiana stands out as the ideal place for our North American home base, situated in Speedway, a town known the world over for its legacy in auto racing,” said Marco ...

Speedway to welcome Italian auto supplier


“Indiana’s motor vehicle industry is prominent around the ...
“This is a large international company with locations in Italy, Brazil, Morocco, India and China,” Harris said. “Speedway will be their first North American location.

Salem's globetrotting centenarian is an inspiration


Their last big trip was in 2013, when they went to Spain, Portugal and Morocco. At this time they have no trips ...
and was stationed at a munitions depot in Indiana before getting out in October 1945. "We were winning the war by that time, and they ...

Italian Auto Supplier Chooses Indiana For North American Headquarters


"Indiana's motor vehicle industry is prominent around the world ...
With 10 locations in Italy, as well as locations in India, China, Brazil and Morocco, the company is a worldwide supplier for original equipment manufacturers in the Fiat Chrysler Group ...

Two Italian suppliers pick Indiana for new U.S. operations


OMR has 3,000 employees worldwide with locations in India, China, Brazil, Morocco and 10 in Italy. Also today, Sirmax, another Italian auto supplier, committed to Indiana, Pence's office said in a statement. The company, based in Cittadella, Italy ...

Photo Friday: Morocco, Indiana


This Morocco isn’t a kingdom in the Mahgreb but a small town in rural northwest Indiana — specifically, it’s in Beaver Township of Newton County. It was founded in 1851. The population was 1,129 at the 2010 census, which shows the town comprising a ...




SPECIAL INFORMATION FOR MOROCCO

Warning in MOROCCO: Government Grant Scams

“Because you pay your income taxes on time, you have been awarded a free $12,500 government grant! To get your grant, simply give us your checking account information, and we will direct-deposit the grant into your bank account!”

Sometimes, it’s an ad that claims you will qualify to receive a “free grant” to pay for education costs, home repairs, home business expenses, or unpaid bills. Other times, it’s a phone call supposedly from a “government” agency or some other organization with an official sounding name. In either case, the claim is the same: your application for a grant is guaranteed to be accepted, and you’ll never have to pay the money back.

But the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the nation’s consumer protection agency, says that “money for nothing” grant offers usually are scams, whether you see them in your local paper or a national magazine, or hear about them on the phone.

Some scam artists advertise “free grants” in the classifieds, inviting readers to call a toll-free number for more information. Others are more bold: they call you out of the blue. They lie about where they’re calling from, or they claim legitimacy using an official-sounding name like the “Federal Grants Administration.” They may ask you some basic questions to determine if you “qualify” to receive a grant. FTC attorneys say calls and come-ons for free money invariably are rip offs.

Grant scammers generally follow a script: they congratulate you on your eligibility, then ask for your checking account information so they can “deposit your grant directly into your account,” or cover a one-time “processing fee.” The caller may even reassure you that you can get a refund if you’re not satisfied. In fact, you’ll never see the grant they promise; they will disappear with your money.

The FTC says following a few basic rules can keep consumers from losing money to these “government grant” scams:

  • Don’t give out your bank account information to anyone you don’t know. Scammers pressure people to divulge their bank account information so that they can steal the money in the account. Always keep your bank account information confidential. Don’t share it unless you are familiar with the company and know why the information is necessary.
  • Don’t pay any money for a “free” government grant. If you have to pay money to claim a “free” government grant, it isn’t really free. A real government agency won’t ask you to pay a processing fee for a grant that you have already been awarded — or to pay for a list of grant-making institutions. The names of agencies and foundations that award grants are available for free at any public library or on the Internet. The only official access point for all federal grant-making agencies is www.grants.gov.
  • Look-alikes aren’t the real thing. Just because the caller says he’s from the “Federal Grants Administration” doesn’t mean that he is. There is no such government agency. Take a moment to check the blue pages in your telephone directory to bear out your hunch — or not.
  • Phone numbers can deceive. Some con artists use Internet technology to disguise their area code in caller ID systems. Although it may look like they’re calling from Washington, DC, they could be calling from anywhere in the world.
  • Take control of the calls you receive. If you want to reduce the number of telemarketing calls you receive, place your telephone number on the National Do Not Call Registry. To register online, visit donotcall.gov. To register by phone, call 1-888-382-1222 (TTY: 1-866-290-4236) from the phone number you wish to register.
  • File a complaint with the FTC. If you think you may have been a victim of a government grant scam, file a complaint with the FTC online, or call toll-free, 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357); TTY: 1-866-653-4261. The FTC enters Internet, telemarketing, identity theft, and other fraud-related complaints into Consumer Sentinel, a secure online database available to hundreds of civil and criminal law enforcement agencies in the U.S. and abroad.
[14]

MOROCCO INDIANA tspan:3m MOROCCO INDIANA




How can consumers in MOROCCO be sure a genetic test is valid and useful?

Before undergoing genetic testing, it is important to be sure that the test is valid and useful. A genetic test is valid if it provides an accurate result. Two main measures of accuracy apply to genetic tests: analytical validity and clinical validity. Another measure of the quality of a genetic test is its usefulness, or clinical utility.

  • Analytical validity refers to how well the test predicts the presence or absence of a particular gene or genetic change. In other words, can the test accurately detect whether a specific genetic variant is present or absent?

  • Clinical validity refers to how well the genetic variant being analyzed is related to the presence, absence, or risk of a specific disease.

  • Clinical utility refers to whether the test can provide information about diagnosis, treatment, management, or prevention of a disease that will be helpful to a consumer.

All laboratories that perform health-related testing, including genetic testing, are subject to federal regulatory standards called the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) or even stricter state requirements. CLIA standards cover how tests are performed, the qualifications of laboratory personnel, and quality control and testing procedures for each laboratory. By controlling the quality of laboratory practices, CLIA standards are designed to ensure the analytical validity of genetic tests.

CLIA standards do not address the clinical validity or clinical utility of genetic tests. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requires information about clinical validity for some genetic tests. Additionally, the state of New York requires information on clinical validity for all laboratory tests performed for people living in that state. Consumers, health providers, and health insurance companies are often the ones who determine the clinical utility of a genetic test.

It can be difficult to determine the quality of a genetic test sold directly to the public. Some providers of direct-to-consumer genetic tests are not CLIA-certified, so it can be difficult to tell whether their tests are valid. If providers of direct-to-consumer genetic tests offer easy-to-understand information about the scientific basis of their tests, it can help consumers make more informed decisions. It may also be helpful to discuss any concerns with a health professional before ordering a direct-to-consumer genetic test.

[2]



Capital to small businesses and entrepreneurs in MOROCCO

The U.S. Treasury Department’s State Small Business Credit Initiative (SSBCI) today released a new Quarterly Report detailing how the program continues to help small businesses grow and create jobs. Since the beginning of the program, the Treasury Department has disbursed more than $1.1 billion to participating states.

“Through the State Small Business Credit Initiative, the Treasury Department, states, and private sector lenders and investors are supporting small businesses and creating a lasting impact on the economy,” said Clifton Kellogg, Director of the SSBCI program. “More than $1 billion in State Small Business Credit Initiative funds have been distributed, making a real difference at the local level. Because of these funds, businesses have been able to buy new equipment, expand their facilities, and hire workers.”

Small businesses and entrepreneurs need capital to build their businesses, and SSBCI is designed to help spur new private sector lending or investment in small companies by leveraging private capital along with the federal support offered by the program. Through SSBCI, the Treasury Department will award nearly $1.5 billion to state programs across the country that support small businesses, including small manufacturers. SSBCI funding is not repaid by participating states to the federal government. Instead, to help even more small businesses, repaid loans and investments remain with participating states to be redeployed locally. The SSBCI Quarterly Report shows that as of September 2014, participating states have recycled more than $60 million to support additional investments.

States have made considerable progress in deploying these funds to support economic growth locally. The states that have deployed the most SSBCI funds by percentage of allocation include: North Dakota (Mandan Consortium), Idaho, Arkansas, Colorado, Montana, South Carolina, New Hampshire, Michigan, Kansas, and Alabama. The states that have deployed the most SSBCI funds by dollar amount include: California, Michigan, Florida, Illinois, Alabama, North Carolina, Texas, New York, Ohio, and Georgia.

SSBCI was created when President Obama signed into law the Small Business Jobs Act on September 27, 2010. The Treasury Department awarded allocations to all fifty states by early 2012, based on a formula set by the Small Business Jobs Act that considered population and unemployment levels. Each state designs its own small business programs, and five types of programs are eligible for SSBCI funds: Capital Access Programs, Loan Guarantee Programs, Loan Participation Programs, Collateral Support Programs, and Venture Capital Programs. In the SSBCI 2013 Annual Report business owners reported that more than 95,000 jobs will be created or saved as a direct result of SSBCI support. [23]








We selected MOROCCO INDIANA LAST NEWS AND IMPORTANT ISSUES. Share!

Feed Widget


If people in the media cannot decide whether they are in the
business of reporting news or manufacturing propaganda,
it is all the more important that the public understand
that difference,and choose their news sources accordingly.
Thomas Sowell

Newsof.org. Selected the top stories of the city of MOROCCO INDIANA. Political events, traffic accidents on highways, downtown events, neighborhoods and inside. Also researched local newspapers and social networks, as well as the site of City Hall. Crimes, are always subject to demand generally for information. Also the tragedies and disasters such as fires, floods, flooding, rain, hail and winds. Tags: Breaking News, MOROCCO INDIANA, City, Indoors, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday , Friday, Saturday, Sunday, Car, Crash, Elections, Beating, Accident, Crime, Police, Criminal, Police, Road, Highway Access, Elections, Party, Hail, Rain, Flood, Anniversary, Award, Month, Week End , Today, Yesterday, Female, Male, Family, Child, People.