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Nelson — 60 years


Bill and Carol Nelson, of Creighton, Nebraska; and Mike and Maria Nelson, of Newton. They have 11 grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. Marilyn Erickson and Lawrence Nelson were married April 24, 1955. He is retired from the Rolfe ProCooperative ...

Nebraska Farm Bureau leader backs House repeal of death tax


LINCOLN — Nebraska Farm Bureau Federation President Steve Nelson of Axtell thanked Nebraska’s three congressional representatives — Republicans Adrian Smith and Jeff Fortenberry and Democrat Brad Ashford — for their votes to pass the Death Tax ...

Roger Leroy Vollertsen, 68 years of age, of Holdrege


Funeral Services for Roger L. Vollertsen will be held on Friday, April 17, 2015 at 2:00 p.m. at the Nelson-Bauer Funeral Home in Holdrege, Nebraska with Reverend Jeff Adams officiating. Burial will follow at the Prairie Home Cemetery at Holdrege.

Nebraska Football: Grading Cornhuskers' Position Groups in Spring 2015


As for the running backs, the four scholarship players (Terrell Newby, Imani Cross, Adam Taylor and Mikale Wilbon) all staked their claim for the position, along with walk-ons Graham Nabity and Jordan Nelson. Nebraska looks to be settling into a committee ...

Ralph Black


NE. Ralph was born on August 13, 1930 to Warren Millard and Helga Marie (Nelson) Black in Dennison, NE. He was raised and schooled in Albion, NE but from age 6-10 he lived with his family in Washington State. Ralph graduated from Albion High School with ...

No place like Nebraska? Mike Riley believes it as 76,000-plus turn out for his 1st spring game


(AP) — According to the school fight song, there is no place like Nebraska. Mike Riley had to agree Saturday ...
have scored if punter Sam Foltz hadn't stopped him. KEEP EYE ON NELSON Walk-on Jordan Nelson, one of the best special-teams players in ...

Playhouse to stage 'Miss Nelson Is Missing'


Allard Jr. and James Marshall, "Miss Nelson Is Missing" is a comedy about a teacher who ...
For reservations, go to lincolnplayhouse.com or call 402-789-7529. * The University of Nebraska State Museum and Mueller Planetarium will celebrate Astronomy ...

Two area students honored at Nebraska Young Artist Awards Day


The Nebraska Young Artist Awards annually recognize 11th grade ...
Sara Gingerich of Potter-Dix High and Rose Nelson, a home-schooled student from Sidney, were among the 60 students from more than 40 high schools across the state who were selected to ...

Meet Kerri Nelson


By unanimous vote Thursday evening, the Shenandoah School Board approved a resolution to offer a contract to Kerri Nelson. A Nebraska native, Nelson has served as superintendent in the South Tama School District for the past seven years. Prior to that ...

Bob Nelson's Decade-Long Odyssey To 'Nebraska'


Further proof that no one really becomes an overnight success is found in the story of Bob Nelson. The 56-year-old wrote what would become Alexander Payne's "Nebraska" back in 2002, as a way to stay employed in an industry that was ready to push him aside.

damiwayne: foggy nelson predicted ultron


damiwayne: foggy nelson predicted ultron

David Hasselhoff Reaches Peak Self-Parody in Promo for Kung Fury


Dinosaurs, fingerless gloves, punks, skateboards, hacking and traveling back in time to try to kill Hitler. It's everything you ever loved about the '80s in one film—now including David Hasslehoff. …

Empty Wheelchair Chases People Around a Mall in One of the Meanest Ad Pranks Yet


Hand out fliers about the dangers of osteoporosis pretty much anywhere and see what happens. Crumple. Toss. No one reads all those statistics. But chase those same folks with a remote-controlled wheel…

Disaster in Paradise launches in Nelson


Disaster in Paradise launches in Nelson When two devastating landslides took homes and lives in the tiny, remote community of Johnson’s Landing in July of 2012, the story made headlines across the cou…

Accounts in Review: the Media Searches Keep Piling Up


As a media agency these days, you're either under siege or flush with opportunity. It became clear this week that Visa and Coty are searching for agencies to handle their global media, adding to a c…

Fort Lauderdale Really Heated Up Bus Shelters in Boston and Chicago This Winter


At the height of winter, a goofy costumed dude called "Mr. Sunny," the official mascot of the Fort Lauderdale tourism, hung out at Pompano Beach and bantered in real time via satellite with people at …

24 Hours in Advertising: Friday, April 17, 2015


Here's everything you need to know about the 24 hours in advertising, in case you blinked. Buzzing on Adweek: Moms use the latest slang for Hefty campaign Hefty's new ads feature three moms using…

Tourists Give Jason Sudeikis Some Directions in AT&T’s Tribeca Film Festival Ad


Live from New York … it's Jason Sudeikis. The former Saturday Night Live cast member appears in "The Tourists," a 45-second video from BBDO promoting AT&T's sponsorship of the Tribeca Film Festival,…

Tinder Introduces Its Instagram Tie-in With This Dreamy New Ad


In a move that now seemed inevitable, Tinder has partnered with Instagram. The dating app's latest update allows users to link to their Instagram profiles. The last 34 Instagram photos pop up when you…

Visa’s Global Media Review Comes Amid Turnover in Marketing


Amid changes in its top marketing ranks, Visa has launched a global review of its media planning and buying, according to sources. Earlier this week, Antonio Lucio, Visa's chief brand officer, said …




SPECIAL INFORMATION FOR NELSON

Make Your Health Benefits Work for You in NELSON NEBRASKA

The Department of Labor´s Employee Benefits Security Administration (EBSA) administers several important health benefit laws covering employer-based health plans. They govern your basic rights to information about how your health plan works, how to qualify for benefits, and how to make claims for benefits.

In addition, there are specific laws protecting your right to health benefits when you lose coverage or change jobs. EBSA also oversees health care laws covering special medical conditions. For more information on the laws that protect your benefits, see EBSA´s Website. Or call the agency toll free at 1-866-444-3272 to reach a regional office near you. These 10 tips can help make your health benefits work better for you.

1. Explore Your Options for Health Coverage

You have options for health coverage. There are many different types of health benefit plans. Find out what your employer offers, then check out the plan (or plans). Your employer´s human resource office, the health plan administrator, or your union can provide information to help you match your needs and preferences with the available plans. Or consider a health plan through the Health Insurance Marketplace. Visit HealthCare.gov to see the health plan options available in your area. Get information about all of your options and review it. The more information you have, the better your health care decisions will be.

2. Review the Benefits Available

Do the plans offered cover the benefits that are important to you, such as mental health services, well-baby care, vision or dental care? Are there deductibles? What are the out-of-pocket expenses you may face? Determine your needs and priorities. Compare all of your options before you decide which coverage to elect. Matching your needs and those of your family members will result in the best possible benefits. Cheapest may not always be best. Your goal is high quality health benefits.

3. Read Your Plan´s Summary Plan Description (SPD) for the Wealth of Information It Provides

Your health plan administrator should provide a copy. It outlines your benefits and your legal rights under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA), the Federal law that protects your health benefits. It also should contain information about the coverage of dependents, what services will require a co-payment or coinsurance, and the circumstances under which your employer can change or terminate a health benefits plan. You also can find many of the answers to your questions in the Summary of Benefits and Coverage (SBC), a short, easy-to-understand summary of what a plan covers and what it costs. You should receive a copy with your enrollment materials. Save the SPD, the SBC, and all other health plan brochures and documents, along with memos or correspondence from your employer relating to health benefits.

4. Use Your Health Coverage

Once your health coverage has started, use it to help cover medical costs for services like going to the doctor, filling prescriptions or getting emergency care. Using your benefits will help you and your family stay healthy and reduce your health care costs. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) provides many valuable protections for people enrolled in employment-based health plans including prohibiting preexisting condition exclusions and annual and lifetime limits on essential health benefits. What’s more, many plans cover certain preventive services for free, including routine vaccinations, regular well-baby and well-child visits, blood pressure, diabetes and cholesterol tests, and many cancer screenings. You also can keep your children on your health plan until age 26. Take advantage of your benefits, especially free preventive care if your plan covers it. If you were required to pay cost-sharing for a preventive service, check your Explanation of Benefits and ensure that the provider billed the service properly.

5. Understand Your Plan’s Mental Health and Substance Use Coverage

Many health plans provide coverage for mental health and substance use disorder benefits. If a plan does offer these benefits, the financial requirements (such as co-payments and deductibles) and the quantitative treatment limits (such as visit limits) for the mental health and substance use disorder benefits cannot be more restrictive than the financial requirements or treatment limits applied to medical/surgical benefits. Plans also cannot impose lifetime and annual limits on the dollar amount of mental health and substance use disorder services, including behavioral health treatment. Some plans cover preventive services like screenings for depression and child behavioral assessments for free. Check your SPD and SBC to find out what your plan covers.

6. Look For Wellness Programs

More employers are establishing wellness programs that encourage employees to work out, stop smoking, and generally adopt healthier lifestyles. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and the ACA encourage group health plans to adopt wellness programs but also includes protections for employees and dependents from impermissible discrimination based on a health factor. These programs often provide rewards such as cost savings as well as promoting good health. Check your SPD and SBC to see whether your plan offers a wellness program(s). If your plan does, find out what reward is offered and what you need to do to receive it.

7. Know How to File an Appeal if Your Health Benefits Claim is Denied

Understand your plan’s procedures for filing a claim for benefits and where to make appeals of the plan´s decisions. Pay attention to time limits – make sure you timely file claims and appeals and that the plan makes decisions on time. Keep records and copies of correspondence. Check your health benefits package and your SPD to determine who is responsible for handling problems with benefit claims. Contact EBSA for assistance if you are unable to obtain a response to your complaint.

8. Assess Your Benefits Coverage as Your Family Status Changes

Marriage, Porce, childbirth or adoption, the death of a spouse, and aging out of a parent’s health plan are life events that may signal a need to change your health benefits. You, your spouse, and your dependent children may be eligible for special enrollment into other employer health coverage or through the Health Insurance Marketplace. Even without life-changing events, the information provided by your employer should tell you how you can change benefits or switch plans. If you’re considering special enrollment, act quickly. You have 30 days after the life event to request special enrollment in other employer coverage or 60 days to select a plan in the Marketplace.

9. Be Aware that Changing Jobs and Other Work Events Can Affect Your Health Benefits

If you change employers or lose your job, you may need to find other health coverage. If you have a new job, consider enrolling in your new employer’s plan. Whether starting or losing a job, you may be eligible to special enroll in a spouse’s employer-sponsored plan or through the Health Insurance Marketplace. Under the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act – better known as COBRA – you, your covered spouse, and your dependent children may be eligible to continue coverage under your former employer-sponsored plan. This coverage is temporary (generally 18 to 36 months) and you may have to pay the entire premium plus a 2 percent administrative charge. Get information on your coverage options and compare. Be aware of the deadlines for deciding on coverage and find out when your new coverage will be effective.

10. Plan For Retirement

Before you retire, find out what health benefits, if any, extend to you and your spouse during your retirement years. Consult with your employer´s human resources office, your union, or the plan administrator. Check your SPD and other plan documents. Make sure there is no conflicting information among these sources about the benefits you will receive or the circumstances under which they can change or be eliminated. With this information in hand, you can make other important choices, like finding out if you are eligible for Medicare and Medigap insurance coverage. If you want to retire before you are eligible for Medicare and your employer does not provide health benefits in retirement, consider what you will do for health coverage. Your options may include enrolling in a spouse’s employer plan or in a Marketplace plan or temporarily continuing your employer coverage by electing COBRA. Planning for retirement includes planning for your health coverage in retirement. To find out more, read Taking the Mystery Out of Retirement Planning.

These Laws Can Help

  • The Employee Retirement Income Security Act – Offers protection for inPiduals enrolled in retirement, health, and other benefit plans sponsored by private-sector employers, and provides rights to information and a claims and appeals process for participants to get benefits from their plans.
  • The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act – Creates the Health Insurance Marketplace and provides protections for employment-based health coverage, including extending dependent coverage of children to age 26; prohibiting preexisting condition exclusions and prohibiting lifetime and annual limits on essential health benefits.
  • The Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act – Contains provisions giving certain former employees, retirees, spouses, and dependent children the right to purchase temporary continuation of group health plan coverage at group rates in specific instances.
  • The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act – Allows employees, their spouses and their dependents to enroll in employer-provided health coverage regardless of open enrollment periods if they lose coverage or in the event of marriage, birth, adoption or placement for adoption. Also prohibits discrimination in health care coverage.
  • The Women´s Health and Cancer Rights Act – Offers protections for breast cancer patients who elect breast reconstruction in connection with a mastectomy.
  • The Newborns´ and Mothers´ Health Protection Act – Provides rules on minimum coverage for hospital lengths of stay following childbirth.
  • The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act – Prohibits discrimination in group health plan premiums based on genetic information. Also, generally prohibits group health plans from requesting genetic information or requiring genetic tests.
  • The Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act and the Mental Health Parity Act – Requires parity in financial requirements and treatment limitations for mental health and substance use benefits with those for medical and surgical benefits.
  • The Children´s Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act – Allows special enrollment in a group health plan if an employee or dependents lose coverage under CHIP or Medicaid or are eligible for premium assistance under those programs.

For More Information

Visit the Employee Benefits Security Administration’s Website to view the following publications. To order copies or to request assistance from a benefits advisor, contact EBSA electronically or call toll free 1-866-444-3272.

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NELSON NEBRASKA: the March employment report reflects a pace of monthly job growth

The March employment report reflects a pace of monthly job growth below the recent trend, coming on the heels of February’s strong report. The unemployment rate was stable, broader measures of unemployment fell, and hourly earnings continued their rise. A range of factors including the weather and the global economic slowdown have affected economic data for the first quarter. The President has been clear that he will continue to push for policies including investments in infrastructure and relief from the sequester that would help ensure the strong underlying longer-term trends persist.

FIVE KEY POINTS IN TODAY’S REPORT FROM THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

1. The private sector has added 12.1 million jobs over 61 straight months of job growth, extending the longest streak on record. Today we learned that total nonfarm payroll employment rose by 126,000 in March, driven by a 129,000 increase in private-sector employment. This particular month’s job gains were below the recent trend, as job growth in a number of industries slowed somewhat (see point 5). Over the past twelve months, the private sector has added 3.1 million jobs, nearly the highest year-over-year growth in the recovery so far.


2. Real aggregate weekly earnings have risen nearly 5 percent over the last twelve months. Real aggregate earnings track the purchasing power of total wages and salaries paid to U.S. private-sector employees, reflecting the combined effects of rising employment, rising wages, and a longer workweek. Aggregate earnings are nearly 7 percent above their pre-crisis peak. Indeed, they have recovered nearly twice their losses during the recession. Year-over-year aggregate earnings growth trended about 2-3 percent at an annual rate in recent years, but has risen to 5 percent year-over-year in recent months as hourly earnings have begun to rise (see point 3).

 


3. Over the past twelve months, rising real hourly earnings accounted for nearly half the increase in real aggregate weekly earnings. The large contribution of rising hourly earnings is a recent trend. Aggregate earnings reached a trough in December 2009, and over the following year-and-a-half, real hourly wages declined. The aggregate earnings increase during that early period was driven by a combination of rising employment and a longer workweek. Over the next three years, both hourly earnings and the workweek were largely stable, with rising employment accounting for 80 percent of the growth in aggregate earnings. Real wage growth over the past year has been a major contributor to the speed-up in aggregate earnings, due to both rising nominal wages and slowing consumer price growth as oil prices have declined. While the recent progress is encouraging, there is more work to do to ensure that real earnings growth is sustained and shared with a broad range of American families.

 


4. The overall share of jobs held by women rose from an average of 48.5 percent in 2001-2007 to 49.3 percent in March 2015. This 0.8 percentage point increase masks substantial variation within industries. Female workers shifted out of smaller industries like financial activities and information services where the female share declined by 3.1 and 3.7 percentage points, respectively and into higher-employment industries like retail trade. Women’s share of employment also increased somewhat in the government sector, where 57 percent of workers are female. Accordingly, women were disproportionately affected by the cuts to government employment that occurred between 2010 and 2013, but they have also disproportionately benefited from net job growth in this sector since mid-2013.

 


5. Job growth in a number of industries fell below recent trends in March. Looking over the 61-month streak of private-sector job growth, March was an especially weak month for mining and logging (-11,000), manufacturing (-1,000), leisure and hospitality (+13,000), and construction (-1,000). The weakness in mining and logging is likely attributable in large part to the recent decline in oil prices. March was a stronger than usual month in retail trade (+26,000) and health care and social assistance (+30,000). Across the 17 industries shown below, the correlation between the most recent one-month percent change and the average percent change over the last twelve months rose to 0.51 from 0.13 last month, remaining somewhat below the average correlation over the past two years.

 


As the Administration stresses every month, the monthly employment and unemployment figures can be volatile, and payroll employment estimates can be subject to substantial revision. Therefore, it is important not to read too much into any one monthly report and it is informative to consider each report in the context of other data as they become available.

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Protect Your Business in NELSON NEBRASKA from Spring Weather Threats

This winter has been particularly harsh for businesses in the northeast and parts of the southern U.S., as record snowfalls and frigid temperatures forced many companies to close their doors for several days.

Many parts of the country are bracing for possible spring floods that may follow when the snow melts. Meanwhile, April through June is the peak time for tornadoes, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The Southeast, Midwest, the Gulf States and the South Central region are particularly vulnerable to these dangerous windstorms.

Now is a good time to make a plan to protect your clients, customers and your business for the threats caused by spring storms and floods. Join the U.S. Small Business Administration and Agility Recovery on Tuesday, March 10 at 2 p.m. EDT for a free webinar on best practices for mitigating spring weather risks. These preparedness tips are based on real-life recovery experiences from business owners.

The SBA has partnered with Agility to offer business continuity strategies through its “PrepareMyBusiness” website. Visit www.preparemybusiness.org to access previous webinars and for additional preparedness tips.

The SBA provides disaster recovery assistance in the form of low-interest loans to homeowners, renters, private nonprofits and businesses of all sizes. To learn more, visit www.sba.gov/disaster.

WHAT: “Preparing for Severe Spring Weather” - A presentation from Agility CEO Bob Boyd, followed by a question and answer session.

WHEN: Tuesday, March 10, 2015 from 2 –3 p.m. EDT
HOW:

Space is limited. Register at http://agil.me/springprepsba

# # #

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Newsof.org. Selected the top stories of the city of NELSON NEBRASKA. Political events, traffic accidents on highways, downtown events, neighborhoods and inside. Also researched local newspapers and social networks, as well as the site of City Hall. Crimes, are always subject to demand generally for information. Also the tragedies and disasters such as fires, floods, flooding, rain, hail and winds. Tags: Breaking News, NELSON NEBRASKA, City, Indoors, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday , Friday, Saturday, Sunday, Car, Crash, Elections, Beating, Accident, Crime, Police, Criminal, Police, Road, Highway Access, Elections, Party, Hail, Rain, Flood, Anniversary, Award, Month, Week End , Today, Yesterday, Female, Male, Family, Child, People.