PALISADE MINNESOTA
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Latest News - PALISADE MINNESOTA

DNR Spring Volunteer Opportunities


Volunteers need to be available for the duration of the morning. Trapping will occur daily including some weekends near Palisade, MN and at the Sax-Zim Bog located near Meadowlands, MN. Transportation is available from Grand Rapids to study sites with DNR ...

Oregon brewers strike out on own ...
in Minnesota


A pair of Oregon-cultivated brewing talents have taken those skills to the far northern environs of Minnesota. The company began construction ...
Boundary Waters Brunette Brown Ale, Palisade Porter and Trailbreaker Belgian Wheat. The company also has ...

Public notices - 150211


Both in Aitkin County, Minnesota Check here if all or part of the described real property is Registered (Torrens) n/a The physical street address, city, and zip code of the mortgaged premises: 46310 US Highway 169, Palisade, Minnesota 56469. The person ...

Joseph M. Bremer


He enjoyed fishing, auctions, snowmobiling, camping and his camper at Palisade, MN. Joe and Judy retired to enjoy their country living. He was a caring, giving person with a huge heart to everyone who knew him well. He was a role model to his children ...

Lucille "Lucy" Mae Young


Lucille "Lucy" Mae Young (Keath), 81, Aitkin, passed away peacefully Sunday, September 21, 2014. She fought and battled dementia for the past four years and finally succumbed to the disease. She was born March 11, 1933 in Palisade, Minnesota to Stanley and ...

Darrel D. Severson


Severson, Darrel Dwaine 4/20/1939 - 2/19/2014 Resident of Palisade, MN Darrel was born and raised in Minneapolis MN. He served in the United States Marine Corps and was a former member of the Ironworkers Local 512. But his real passion spanned 26 years as ...

Thermowood growing in Palisade


Palisade, Minnesota, [pop. 1,295] might seem an unlikely place for a new business to start-up and develop a world-wide market. But that’s just what John Bieganek is doing - and NRRI’s Product Development Fund helped him, against all odds, to do it.

Proposed Waste Disposal Facility Has Some MN Residents Talking Trash


Palisade, MN (Northland's NewsCenter) --- "The people here do not want it," Palisade resident Dave Trapp said. "It" is a plasma arc gasification facility. "Here" is Palisade, Minnesota, where a community has been divided over a proposal to bring the ...

FREE SPEECH ZONE | Garbage and tire "gasifier" promoted in Palisade, MN


...
calling itself "Palisade PAGE [Plasma Arc Gasification Endeavor]" is promoting an "incinerator in disguise" in Palisade, Minnesota, population 118 in the 2000 census. At a meeting on June 29, 2010, the promoters announced they want to burn ("gasify ...

Palisade, Minnesota Vacation Rentals


Palisade, Minnesota offers great vacation house rental and home rental-by-owner deals for the knowledgeable traveler. No matter what budget or level of comfort you seek in your holiday to Palisade, MN, there's surely a great local vacation home rental ...

Taking Thrones in early game


So, one thing I’ve gotten a lot of questions about is how I took three level 2 thrones in the first year, and especially how I did it while still having enough troops to be able to immediately thereaf…

Liquid Palisade Review


If you are following any number of Instagram nail accounts you have probably heard of Liquid Palisade by now. I actually heard about it maybe 4 years ago when it first came out (I believe.) Back then …

Select the Best Head Style for Palisade Fencing from Service Providers!


adamflecherr: Select the Best Head Style for Palisade Fencing from Service Providers! Originally posted on swfencing: Installing a perfect security fencing system is quite important for both commerc…

1468 PHILIPPINES (Central Visayas) - Fort San Pedro in Cebu


Front entrance of Fuerte de San Pedro Built in 1565 in the pier area of the Cebu City by Spanish and indigenous Cebuano labourers under the command of conquistador Miguel López de Legazpi, Fuerte de S…

A Living Palisade


One of the gardening tasks I am most ambivalent about is the removal of trees, especially specimen ones like that I tackled today, or heavy pruning of shrubs that have been allowed to grow into them. …

Beyond the Nugget: Best Kids’ Menus in Town


Desperate times call for desperate measures, and we’ve all paid too much for a mediocre restaurant lunch of pb&j or Kraft mac ‘n’ cheese just to keep Junior happy. But when there’s time to plan, we re…

Comment on Liquid Palisade – A Review by Lex - stormandstars


Something to mention about Liquid Palisade and other similar products (I’ve seen quite a few pop up in the indie world recently.) is that these products do contain latex! I almost splurged on a bottle…

Sticky: Outdoor activities in Colorado - Curious Colorado: New Year's Resolutions


Outdoor activities in Colorado Spice up 2015 with some Colorado creativity, from getting healthy in one of the top 10 fittest states in the U.S to discovering where your food comes from; here are som…

Liquid Palisade by Kiesque


I can’t begin to tell you how amazing Liquid Palisade by Kiesque really is! If you’re like me and attempt nail art, with the dread of knowing you’re about to face a messy clean-up, then this little ge…

Bargain Alternative To Liquid Palisade Liquid Nail Tape


Hey There Polished People! Before I show you what I want to show you today, have you ever worked REALLY hard on something only to have it turn out like crap and you just want to punch someone and/or…




SPECIAL INFORMATION FOR PALISADE

PALISADE MINNESOTA: part-time employment while you are enrolled in school

Federal Work-Study provides part-time jobs for undergraduate and graduate students with financial need, allowing them to earn money to help pay education expenses. The program encourages community service work and work related to the student’s course of study.

Here’s a quick overview of Federal Work-Study:

  • It provides part-time employment while you are enrolled in school.
  • It’s available to undergraduate, graduate, and professional students with financial need.
  • It’s available to full-time or part-time students.
  • It’s administered by schools participating in the Federal Work-Study Program. Check with your school´s financial aid office to find out if your school participates.

What kinds of jobs are there?
Are jobs on campus or off campus?
How much can I earn?
How will I be paid?
Can I work as many hours as I want?


What kinds of jobs are there?

The Federal Work-Study Program emphasizes employment in civic education and work related to your course of study, whenever possible.

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Are jobs on campus or off campus?

Both. If you work on campus, you’ll usually work for your school. If you work off campus, your employer will usually be a private nonprofit organization or a public agency, and the work performed must be in the public interest.

Some schools might have agreements with private for-profit employers for work-study jobs. These jobs must be relevant to your course of study (to the maximum extent possible). If you attend a proprietary school (i.e., a for-profit institution), there may be further restrictions on the types of jobs you can be assigned.

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Man working in shop class

If you’re interested in getting a Federal Work-Study job while you’re enrolled in college or career school, make sure you apply for aid early. Schools that participate in the Federal Work-Study Program award funds on a first come, first served basis.


How much can I earn?

You’ll earn at least the current federal minimum wage. However, you may earn more depending on the type of work you do and the skills required for the position.

Your total work-study award depends on:

  • when you apply,
  • your level of financial need, and
  • your school’s funding level.

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How will I be paid?

How you’re paid depends partly on whether you’re an undergraduate or graduate student.

  • If you are an undergraduate student, you´re paid by the hour.
  • If you are a graduate or professional student, you´re paid by the hour or by salary, depending on the work you do.
  • Your school must pay you at least once a month.
  • Your school must pay you directly unless you request that the school
    • send your payments directly to your bank account or
    • use the money to pay for your education-related institutional charges such as tuition, fees, and room and board.

Top


Can I work as many hours as I want?

No. The amount you earn can’t exceed your total Federal Work-Study award. When assigning work hours, your employer or your school’s financial aid office will consider your class schedule and your academic progress.

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Make Your Health Benefits Work for You in PALISADE MINNESOTA

The Department of Labor´s Employee Benefits Security Administration (EBSA) administers several important health benefit laws covering employer-based health plans. They govern your basic rights to information about how your health plan works, how to qualify for benefits, and how to make claims for benefits.

In addition, there are specific laws protecting your right to health benefits when you lose coverage or change jobs. EBSA also oversees health care laws covering special medical conditions. For more information on the laws that protect your benefits, see EBSA´s Website. Or call the agency toll free at 1-866-444-3272 to reach a regional office near you. These 10 tips can help make your health benefits work better for you.

1. Explore Your Options for Health Coverage

You have options for health coverage. There are many different types of health benefit plans. Find out what your employer offers, then check out the plan (or plans). Your employer´s human resource office, the health plan administrator, or your union can provide information to help you match your needs and preferences with the available plans. Or consider a health plan through the Health Insurance Marketplace. Visit HealthCare.gov to see the health plan options available in your area. Get information about all of your options and review it. The more information you have, the better your health care decisions will be.

2. Review the Benefits Available

Do the plans offered cover the benefits that are important to you, such as mental health services, well-baby care, vision or dental care? Are there deductibles? What are the out-of-pocket expenses you may face? Determine your needs and priorities. Compare all of your options before you decide which coverage to elect. Matching your needs and those of your family members will result in the best possible benefits. Cheapest may not always be best. Your goal is high quality health benefits.

3. Read Your Plan´s Summary Plan Description (SPD) for the Wealth of Information It Provides

Your health plan administrator should provide a copy. It outlines your benefits and your legal rights under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA), the Federal law that protects your health benefits. It also should contain information about the coverage of dependents, what services will require a co-payment or coinsurance, and the circumstances under which your employer can change or terminate a health benefits plan. You also can find many of the answers to your questions in the Summary of Benefits and Coverage (SBC), a short, easy-to-understand summary of what a plan covers and what it costs. You should receive a copy with your enrollment materials. Save the SPD, the SBC, and all other health plan brochures and documents, along with memos or correspondence from your employer relating to health benefits.

4. Use Your Health Coverage

Once your health coverage has started, use it to help cover medical costs for services like going to the doctor, filling prescriptions or getting emergency care. Using your benefits will help you and your family stay healthy and reduce your health care costs. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) provides many valuable protections for people enrolled in employment-based health plans including prohibiting preexisting condition exclusions and annual and lifetime limits on essential health benefits. What’s more, many plans cover certain preventive services for free, including routine vaccinations, regular well-baby and well-child visits, blood pressure, diabetes and cholesterol tests, and many cancer screenings. You also can keep your children on your health plan until age 26. Take advantage of your benefits, especially free preventive care if your plan covers it. If you were required to pay cost-sharing for a preventive service, check your Explanation of Benefits and ensure that the provider billed the service properly.

5. Understand Your Plan’s Mental Health and Substance Use Coverage

Many health plans provide coverage for mental health and substance use disorder benefits. If a plan does offer these benefits, the financial requirements (such as co-payments and deductibles) and the quantitative treatment limits (such as visit limits) for the mental health and substance use disorder benefits cannot be more restrictive than the financial requirements or treatment limits applied to medical/surgical benefits. Plans also cannot impose lifetime and annual limits on the dollar amount of mental health and substance use disorder services, including behavioral health treatment. Some plans cover preventive services like screenings for depression and child behavioral assessments for free. Check your SPD and SBC to find out what your plan covers.

6. Look For Wellness Programs

More employers are establishing wellness programs that encourage employees to work out, stop smoking, and generally adopt healthier lifestyles. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and the ACA encourage group health plans to adopt wellness programs but also includes protections for employees and dependents from impermissible discrimination based on a health factor. These programs often provide rewards such as cost savings as well as promoting good health. Check your SPD and SBC to see whether your plan offers a wellness program(s). If your plan does, find out what reward is offered and what you need to do to receive it.

7. Know How to File an Appeal if Your Health Benefits Claim is Denied

Understand your plan’s procedures for filing a claim for benefits and where to make appeals of the plan´s decisions. Pay attention to time limits – make sure you timely file claims and appeals and that the plan makes decisions on time. Keep records and copies of correspondence. Check your health benefits package and your SPD to determine who is responsible for handling problems with benefit claims. Contact EBSA for assistance if you are unable to obtain a response to your complaint.

8. Assess Your Benefits Coverage as Your Family Status Changes

Marriage, Porce, childbirth or adoption, the death of a spouse, and aging out of a parent’s health plan are life events that may signal a need to change your health benefits. You, your spouse, and your dependent children may be eligible for special enrollment into other employer health coverage or through the Health Insurance Marketplace. Even without life-changing events, the information provided by your employer should tell you how you can change benefits or switch plans. If you’re considering special enrollment, act quickly. You have 30 days after the life event to request special enrollment in other employer coverage or 60 days to select a plan in the Marketplace.

9. Be Aware that Changing Jobs and Other Work Events Can Affect Your Health Benefits

If you change employers or lose your job, you may need to find other health coverage. If you have a new job, consider enrolling in your new employer’s plan. Whether starting or losing a job, you may be eligible to special enroll in a spouse’s employer-sponsored plan or through the Health Insurance Marketplace. Under the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act – better known as COBRA – you, your covered spouse, and your dependent children may be eligible to continue coverage under your former employer-sponsored plan. This coverage is temporary (generally 18 to 36 months) and you may have to pay the entire premium plus a 2 percent administrative charge. Get information on your coverage options and compare. Be aware of the deadlines for deciding on coverage and find out when your new coverage will be effective.

10. Plan For Retirement

Before you retire, find out what health benefits, if any, extend to you and your spouse during your retirement years. Consult with your employer´s human resources office, your union, or the plan administrator. Check your SPD and other plan documents. Make sure there is no conflicting information among these sources about the benefits you will receive or the circumstances under which they can change or be eliminated. With this information in hand, you can make other important choices, like finding out if you are eligible for Medicare and Medigap insurance coverage. If you want to retire before you are eligible for Medicare and your employer does not provide health benefits in retirement, consider what you will do for health coverage. Your options may include enrolling in a spouse’s employer plan or in a Marketplace plan or temporarily continuing your employer coverage by electing COBRA. Planning for retirement includes planning for your health coverage in retirement. To find out more, read Taking the Mystery Out of Retirement Planning.

These Laws Can Help

  • The Employee Retirement Income Security Act – Offers protection for inPiduals enrolled in retirement, health, and other benefit plans sponsored by private-sector employers, and provides rights to information and a claims and appeals process for participants to get benefits from their plans.
  • The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act – Creates the Health Insurance Marketplace and provides protections for employment-based health coverage, including extending dependent coverage of children to age 26; prohibiting preexisting condition exclusions and prohibiting lifetime and annual limits on essential health benefits.
  • The Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act – Contains provisions giving certain former employees, retirees, spouses, and dependent children the right to purchase temporary continuation of group health plan coverage at group rates in specific instances.
  • The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act – Allows employees, their spouses and their dependents to enroll in employer-provided health coverage regardless of open enrollment periods if they lose coverage or in the event of marriage, birth, adoption or placement for adoption. Also prohibits discrimination in health care coverage.
  • The Women´s Health and Cancer Rights Act – Offers protections for breast cancer patients who elect breast reconstruction in connection with a mastectomy.
  • The Newborns´ and Mothers´ Health Protection Act – Provides rules on minimum coverage for hospital lengths of stay following childbirth.
  • The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act – Prohibits discrimination in group health plan premiums based on genetic information. Also, generally prohibits group health plans from requesting genetic information or requiring genetic tests.
  • The Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act and the Mental Health Parity Act – Requires parity in financial requirements and treatment limitations for mental health and substance use benefits with those for medical and surgical benefits.
  • The Children´s Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act – Allows special enrollment in a group health plan if an employee or dependents lose coverage under CHIP or Medicaid or are eligible for premium assistance under those programs.

For More Information

Visit the Employee Benefits Security Administration’s Website to view the following publications. To order copies or to request assistance from a benefits advisor, contact EBSA electronically or call toll free 1-866-444-3272.

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Giving Every Young Person in PALISADE MINNESOTA a Path to Reach Their Potential

Our nation’s most basic duty is to ensure that every child has the chance to fulfill his or her potential. This isn’t the responsibility of one individual or one neighborhood: it’s up to all of us to pave these paths of opportunity so that young people — regardless of where they grow up — can get ahead in life and achieve their dreams.

That’s why My Brother’s Keeper (MBK) is such an important initiative. Launched by President Obama last year, MBK brings communities together to ensure that all youth — including boys and young men of color — can overcome barriers to success and improve their lives. I got to see this work up close during a recent trip to Oakland, California. I joined Mayor Libby Schaaf, City Council President Lynette McElhaney, and other stakeholders for a conversation about efforts that are making a difference in the lives of local youth.

One of the participants was a teenager named Edwin Manzano. The son of a hard-working single parent, Edwin found encouragement and support at the East Oakland Youth Development Center (EOYDC). Thanks in part to the academic and mentoring services offered by the EOYDC, Edwin will become the first member of his family to attend college when he begins his studies this fall at San Francisco State University.

Edwin is grateful for the opportunities that EOYDC afforded him. “Everyone needs a support system,” he says. That’s true whether you are a teenager or HUD Secretary. I was lucky when I was growing up on the West Side of San Antonio. Although it was a modest community in terms of resources, it was rich with folks who took an interest in my future. I had family members, teachers — and even policymakers — who paved a path that allowed me and other young people like me to succeed.

Unfortunately, not every child is as fortunate. That’s why My Brother’s Keeper is so close to my heart. The future of every young person in America should be determined by their heart, their mind and their work ethic. It should never be determined by their zip code.

In Oakland, I talked with 17 young people who have big hopes and aspirations for the future. It’s in our nation’s interest to help them achieve their goals. And we’re committed to doing our part at HUD.

For example, we’ve introduced a Jobs-Plus pilot program that will provide public housing residents in eight cities with intensive employment training, rent incentives and community building focused on work and economic self-sufficiency.

We’re also working on a broadband initiative to ensure that students living in HUD-assisted households will benefit from the life-changing opportunities available through high-speed internet. This project will provide the access to online resources that young people need to succeed in the 21st century global economy.

On the housing front, we expect the recent expansion of our Rental Assistance Demonstration (RAD) initiative to aid HUD-assisted properties in raising billions of dollars in private sector investment — funding that will be used to secure our nation’s affordable housing future. And recently, our Federal Housing Administration lowered its Mortgage Insurance Premiums to make homeownership more affordable for responsible families, helping them put down roots and build wealth for the future.

But I know HUD alone won’t solve the issues facing America’s youth. These challenges require our Department to maintain longstanding, effective partnerships with other federal agencies and key stakeholders. Most importantly, President Obama understands that My Brother’s Keeper will only succeed if local leaders take his call to action into their own hands.

Folks in Oakland are stepping up to answer this call. During the Community Conversation, I spoke with leaders from Oakland’s nonprofits, philanthropic institutions, and faith-based organizations that are putting our young people on the path to success. Groups like the East Oakland Youth Development Center, the East Bay Foundation, and the Allen Temple Baptist Church are using promising and proven approaches to make a real difference in their communities.

This kind of work is happening all across the nation and will benefit generations of Americans. We’ve got to keep it going by continuing to support our young people. When they succeed, our nation grows stronger, and our future becomes brighter. And by giving everyone an opportunity to reach their goals, we can ensure that the 21st century is another American century.

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