PIKE COUNTY OHIO NEWS AND BLOG


Latest News - PIKE COUNTY OHIO

County unemployment at 7.2 percent


In the southern Ohio region, Meigs County is the highest at 8.1 percent and Lawrence County has the lowest unemployment rate in the region at 4.9 percent. Pike County is 7.6, Adams - 6.8 and Jackson at 6.4 percent. The highest unemployment rate in the ...

Weather key to Monday crashes; teens in Sunday ones


CHILLICOTHE – The Ohio Highway Patrol was busy Sunday and Monday dealing with minor injury crashes across the area. Weather was the primary culprit in a pair of Monday crashes. One took place on Germany Road near Gravel Hill Road in Pike County when a ...

Gallia eligible to compete for $375 K in grant dollars


GALLIA COUNTY — The Gallia County Commissioners recently announced that up to $375,000 in competitive grant funds are now available through the Southern Ohio Agricultural and ...
Lawrence, Scioto, Pike and Jackson counties. Melissa Clark, director ...

Pike County Crash Injures One Person


The Ohio State Highway Patrol is investigating a one vehicle injury crash Sunday, that sent a Waverly man to the hospital. The patrol states that at 2:20pm, they received a report of a one vehicle injury crash on Wilson Run Road just south of Back Hollow Road.

Lawmakers seek more funding for Ohio uranium site cleanup


“We hope these efforts will bring the budgetary certainty that Ohio, our workers and communities need to complete this project,” site project director Dennis Carr said in a statement. Pike County Commissioner Blaine Beekman said a variety of ...

Chasing the Crown: Eastern grad participates in state fair queen contest


“I plan to continue my education and graduate in the spring of 2018.” For over a decade, Johnson was active in 4-H in Pike County. In 2013, she was chosen to represent Ohio 4-H youth on a national level at the 2013 National 4-H Conference, in ...

Author takes a drive into Amish country, Pike County


Laurel Ridge Road ends at SR 772 in Pike County. We turned left onto SR 772 and a few miles ...
We turned right and ended up back at SR 32. Turning right onto Ohio SR 32, we drove until we found Germany Road. Our destination for the day was supposed ...

New Ohio House Speaker Cliff Rosenberger signals a worthy desire to get things done for Ohioans: editorial


Rosenberger, an Air Force veteran and the first Asian-American to lead Ohio's House or state Senate, represents 122,000 Ohioans in Clinton (Wilmington), Highland (Hillsboro) and Pike (Waverly) counties and part of Ross County (Chillicothe). But as House ...

Lake White dam in Pike County to cost $35 million to fix


The dam at Lake White State Park in Pike County sprang a leak last summer, and now the state says it expects to spend $35.5 million to fix it. It will be a massive project involving the Ohio Department of Natural Resources and the Ohio Department of ...

Pike County Dentist Gives Away Jeep


Perchick said. “Oh, we’re so excited, we’re really excited,” said Dr. John Evanish. “The woman who won, she’s thrilled to death.” Dr. Evanish says he gave away the Jeep to celebrate 20 years of service to this part of Pike County.




SPECIAL INFORMATION FOR PIKE COUNTY

Exercise at any age is vital for healthy bones and is essential for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.

Exercise not only improves bone health, it also increases muscle strength, coordination and balance and helps improve overall health.

Why do you exercise?

Bones, like muscles, are living tissue that responds to exercise by becoming stronger. In general, women and young men who exercise regularly reach a higher bone density (the highest level of consistency and strength of bones) than those who do not exercise. Most people reach peak bone density between 20 and 30 years old. From that age usually bone density begins to decrease. Women and men over age 20 can help prevent bone loss hacienda exercise frequently. The exercise allows us to maintain muscle strength, coordination and balance, which in turn helps prevent falls and fractures. This is especially important for older adults and people who have been diagnosed with osteoporosis.

The best exercise to strengthen bones

The best exercise for your bones is required weight-bearing. This type of exercise makes you strive to work against gravity. Examples of these exercises include weight lifting, walking, hiking, jogging, stair climbing, tennis and dance. In contrast, exercises that do not require weight-bearing include swimming and cycling. While these exercises help strengthen and maintain strong muscles and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, are not the most effective in strengthening bones.

Exercise Tips

If you have health problems such as heart problems, high blood pressure, diabetes or obesity, or if you are 40 years old or more, consult your doctor before you start exercising regularly. According to the Surgeon General, the optimal goal is to exercise for at least 30 minutes most days; preferably daily.

Pay attention to your body. When starting an exercise routine, you may have some pain and discomfort in the muscles, but should not be painful or last more than 48 hours. If this occurs, you may be working too hard and need to slow down. Stop exercising if you feel any pain or discomfort in the chest and talk to your doctor before your next workout.

If you have osteoporosis, it is important to ask your doctor what activities are safe for you. If you have low bone density, experts recommend that the column is protected and avoiding exercises or activities that cause bending or twisting of the back. Moreover, should avoid high-impact exercise to reduce the risk of breaking a bone. You can also consult with an exercise specialist to teach you the proper progression of their activities, to stretch and strengthen muscles safely, and correct bad posture habits. An exercise specialist should have a degree in exercise physiology, physical education, physiotherapy or similar specialty. Be sure to ask if you are familiar with the special needs of people with osteoporosis.

A comprehensive system to combat osteoporosis

Remember, exercise is only part of a regimen for the prevention or treatment of osteoporosis. Like a diet rich in calcium and vitamin D, exercise helps strengthen bones at any age. But it is possible that good nutrition and exercise are not enough to stop the loss of bone density caused by medical conditions, menopause or certain habits such as the use of snuff and excessive consumption of alcohol. It is important to talk to your doctor about your bone health. Ask if you are a candidate for a bone density test. If densitometry shows low bone mass, ask what medications may help maintain healthy bones and fight osteoporosis. [16]



PIKE COUNTY OHIO tspan:3m PIKE COUNTY OHIO




Make Your Health Benefits Work for You in PIKE COUNTY

The Department of Labor´s Employee Benefits Security Administration (EBSA) administers several important health benefit laws covering employer-based health plans. They govern your basic rights to information about how your health plan works, how to qualify for benefits, and how to make claims for benefits.

In addition, there are specific laws protecting your right to health benefits when you lose coverage or change jobs. EBSA also oversees health care laws covering special medical conditions. For more information on the laws that protect your benefits, see EBSA´s Website. Or call the agency toll free at 1-866-444-3272 to reach a regional office near you. These 10 tips can help make your health benefits work better for you.

1. Explore Your Options for Health Coverage

You have options for health coverage. There are many different types of health benefit plans. Find out what your employer offers, then check out the plan (or plans). Your employer´s human resource office, the health plan administrator, or your union can provide information to help you match your needs and preferences with the available plans. Or consider a health plan through the Health Insurance Marketplace. Visit HealthCare.gov to see the health plan options available in your area. Get information about all of your options and review it. The more information you have, the better your health care decisions will be.

2. Review the Benefits Available

Do the plans offered cover the benefits that are important to you, such as mental health services, well-baby care, vision or dental care? Are there deductibles? What are the out-of-pocket expenses you may face? Determine your needs and priorities. Compare all of your options before you decide which coverage to elect. Matching your needs and those of your family members will result in the best possible benefits. Cheapest may not always be best. Your goal is high quality health benefits.

3. Read Your Plan´s Summary Plan Description (SPD) for the Wealth of Information It Provides

Your health plan administrator should provide a copy. It outlines your benefits and your legal rights under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA), the Federal law that protects your health benefits. It also should contain information about the coverage of dependents, what services will require a co-payment or coinsurance, and the circumstances under which your employer can change or terminate a health benefits plan. You also can find many of the answers to your questions in the Summary of Benefits and Coverage (SBC), a short, easy-to-understand summary of what a plan covers and what it costs. You should receive a copy with your enrollment materials. Save the SPD, the SBC, and all other health plan brochures and documents, along with memos or correspondence from your employer relating to health benefits.

4. Use Your Health Coverage

Once your health coverage has started, use it to help cover medical costs for services like going to the doctor, filling prescriptions or getting emergency care. Using your benefits will help you and your family stay healthy and reduce your health care costs. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) provides many valuable protections for people enrolled in employment-based health plans including prohibiting preexisting condition exclusions and annual and lifetime limits on essential health benefits. What’s more, many plans cover certain preventive services for free, including routine vaccinations, regular well-baby and well-child visits, blood pressure, diabetes and cholesterol tests, and many cancer screenings. You also can keep your children on your health plan until age 26. Take advantage of your benefits, especially free preventive care if your plan covers it. If you were required to pay cost-sharing for a preventive service, check your Explanation of Benefits and ensure that the provider billed the service properly.

5. Understand Your Plan’s Mental Health and Substance Use Coverage

Many health plans provide coverage for mental health and substance use disorder benefits. If a plan does offer these benefits, the financial requirements (such as co-payments and deductibles) and the quantitative treatment limits (such as visit limits) for the mental health and substance use disorder benefits cannot be more restrictive than the financial requirements or treatment limits applied to medical/surgical benefits. Plans also cannot impose lifetime and annual limits on the dollar amount of mental health and substance use disorder services, including behavioral health treatment. Some plans cover preventive services like screenings for depression and child behavioral assessments for free. Check your SPD and SBC to find out what your plan covers.

6. Look For Wellness Programs

More employers are establishing wellness programs that encourage employees to work out, stop smoking, and generally adopt healthier lifestyles. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and the ACA encourage group health plans to adopt wellness programs but also includes protections for employees and dependents from impermissible discrimination based on a health factor. These programs often provide rewards such as cost savings as well as promoting good health. Check your SPD and SBC to see whether your plan offers a wellness program(s). If your plan does, find out what reward is offered and what you need to do to receive it.

7. Know How to File an Appeal if Your Health Benefits Claim is Denied

Understand your plan’s procedures for filing a claim for benefits and where to make appeals of the plan´s decisions. Pay attention to time limits – make sure you timely file claims and appeals and that the plan makes decisions on time. Keep records and copies of correspondence. Check your health benefits package and your SPD to determine who is responsible for handling problems with benefit claims. Contact EBSA for assistance if you are unable to obtain a response to your complaint.

8. Assess Your Benefits Coverage as Your Family Status Changes

Marriage, Porce, childbirth or adoption, the death of a spouse, and aging out of a parent’s health plan are life events that may signal a need to change your health benefits. You, your spouse, and your dependent children may be eligible for special enrollment into other employer health coverage or through the Health Insurance Marketplace. Even without life-changing events, the information provided by your employer should tell you how you can change benefits or switch plans. If you’re considering special enrollment, act quickly. You have 30 days after the life event to request special enrollment in other employer coverage or 60 days to select a plan in the Marketplace.

9. Be Aware that Changing Jobs and Other Work Events Can Affect Your Health Benefits

If you change employers or lose your job, you may need to find other health coverage. If you have a new job, consider enrolling in your new employer’s plan. Whether starting or losing a job, you may be eligible to special enroll in a spouse’s employer-sponsored plan or through the Health Insurance Marketplace. Under the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act – better known as COBRA – you, your covered spouse, and your dependent children may be eligible to continue coverage under your former employer-sponsored plan. This coverage is temporary (generally 18 to 36 months) and you may have to pay the entire premium plus a 2 percent administrative charge. Get information on your coverage options and compare. Be aware of the deadlines for deciding on coverage and find out when your new coverage will be effective.

10. Plan For Retirement

Before you retire, find out what health benefits, if any, extend to you and your spouse during your retirement years. Consult with your employer´s human resources office, your union, or the plan administrator. Check your SPD and other plan documents. Make sure there is no conflicting information among these sources about the benefits you will receive or the circumstances under which they can change or be eliminated. With this information in hand, you can make other important choices, like finding out if you are eligible for Medicare and Medigap insurance coverage. If you want to retire before you are eligible for Medicare and your employer does not provide health benefits in retirement, consider what you will do for health coverage. Your options may include enrolling in a spouse’s employer plan or in a Marketplace plan or temporarily continuing your employer coverage by electing COBRA. Planning for retirement includes planning for your health coverage in retirement. To find out more, read Taking the Mystery Out of Retirement Planning.

These Laws Can Help

  • The Employee Retirement Income Security Act – Offers protection for inPiduals enrolled in retirement, health, and other benefit plans sponsored by private-sector employers, and provides rights to information and a claims and appeals process for participants to get benefits from their plans.
  • The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act – Creates the Health Insurance Marketplace and provides protections for employment-based health coverage, including extending dependent coverage of children to age 26; prohibiting preexisting condition exclusions and prohibiting lifetime and annual limits on essential health benefits.
  • The Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act – Contains provisions giving certain former employees, retirees, spouses, and dependent children the right to purchase temporary continuation of group health plan coverage at group rates in specific instances.
  • The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act – Allows employees, their spouses and their dependents to enroll in employer-provided health coverage regardless of open enrollment periods if they lose coverage or in the event of marriage, birth, adoption or placement for adoption. Also prohibits discrimination in health care coverage.
  • The Women´s Health and Cancer Rights Act – Offers protections for breast cancer patients who elect breast reconstruction in connection with a mastectomy.
  • The Newborns´ and Mothers´ Health Protection Act – Provides rules on minimum coverage for hospital lengths of stay following childbirth.
  • The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act – Prohibits discrimination in group health plan premiums based on genetic information. Also, generally prohibits group health plans from requesting genetic information or requiring genetic tests.
  • The Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act and the Mental Health Parity Act – Requires parity in financial requirements and treatment limitations for mental health and substance use benefits with those for medical and surgical benefits.
  • The Children´s Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act – Allows special enrollment in a group health plan if an employee or dependents lose coverage under CHIP or Medicaid or are eligible for premium assistance under those programs.

For More Information

Visit the Employee Benefits Security Administration’s Website to view the following publications. To order copies or to request assistance from a benefits advisor, contact EBSA electronically or call toll free 1-866-444-3272.

[4]



Warning in PIKE COUNTY: Government Grant Scams

“Because you pay your income taxes on time, you have been awarded a free $12,500 government grant! To get your grant, simply give us your checking account information, and we will direct-deposit the grant into your bank account!”

Sometimes, it’s an ad that claims you will qualify to receive a “free grant” to pay for education costs, home repairs, home business expenses, or unpaid bills. Other times, it’s a phone call supposedly from a “government” agency or some other organization with an official sounding name. In either case, the claim is the same: your application for a grant is guaranteed to be accepted, and you’ll never have to pay the money back.

But the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the nation’s consumer protection agency, says that “money for nothing” grant offers usually are scams, whether you see them in your local paper or a national magazine, or hear about them on the phone.

Some scam artists advertise “free grants” in the classifieds, inviting readers to call a toll-free number for more information. Others are more bold: they call you out of the blue. They lie about where they’re calling from, or they claim legitimacy using an official-sounding name like the “Federal Grants Administration.” They may ask you some basic questions to determine if you “qualify” to receive a grant. FTC attorneys say calls and come-ons for free money invariably are rip offs.

Grant scammers generally follow a script: they congratulate you on your eligibility, then ask for your checking account information so they can “deposit your grant directly into your account,” or cover a one-time “processing fee.” The caller may even reassure you that you can get a refund if you’re not satisfied. In fact, you’ll never see the grant they promise; they will disappear with your money.

The FTC says following a few basic rules can keep consumers from losing money to these “government grant” scams:

  • Don’t give out your bank account information to anyone you don’t know. Scammers pressure people to divulge their bank account information so that they can steal the money in the account. Always keep your bank account information confidential. Don’t share it unless you are familiar with the company and know why the information is necessary.
  • Don’t pay any money for a “free” government grant. If you have to pay money to claim a “free” government grant, it isn’t really free. A real government agency won’t ask you to pay a processing fee for a grant that you have already been awarded — or to pay for a list of grant-making institutions. The names of agencies and foundations that award grants are available for free at any public library or on the Internet. The only official access point for all federal grant-making agencies is www.grants.gov.
  • Look-alikes aren’t the real thing. Just because the caller says he’s from the “Federal Grants Administration” doesn’t mean that he is. There is no such government agency. Take a moment to check the blue pages in your telephone directory to bear out your hunch — or not.
  • Phone numbers can deceive. Some con artists use Internet technology to disguise their area code in caller ID systems. Although it may look like they’re calling from Washington, DC, they could be calling from anywhere in the world.
  • Take control of the calls you receive. If you want to reduce the number of telemarketing calls you receive, place your telephone number on the National Do Not Call Registry. To register online, visit donotcall.gov. To register by phone, call 1-888-382-1222 (TTY: 1-866-290-4236) from the phone number you wish to register.
  • File a complaint with the FTC. If you think you may have been a victim of a government grant scam, file a complaint with the FTC online, or call toll-free, 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357); TTY: 1-866-653-4261. The FTC enters Internet, telemarketing, identity theft, and other fraud-related complaints into Consumer Sentinel, a secure online database available to hundreds of civil and criminal law enforcement agencies in the U.S. and abroad.
[14]






We selected PIKE COUNTY OHIO LAST NEWS AND IMPORTANT ISSUES. Share!

Feed Widget


If people in the media cannot decide whether they are in the
business of reporting news or manufacturing propaganda,
it is all the more important that the public understand
that difference,and choose their news sources accordingly.
Thomas Sowell

Newsof.org. Selected the top stories of the city of PIKE COUNTY OHIO. Political events, traffic accidents on highways, downtown events, neighborhoods and inside. Also researched local newspapers and social networks, as well as the site of City Hall. Crimes, are always subject to demand generally for information. Also the tragedies and disasters such as fires, floods, flooding, rain, hail and winds. Tags: Breaking News, PIKE COUNTY OHIO, City, Indoors, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday , Friday, Saturday, Sunday, Car, Crash, Elections, Beating, Accident, Crime, Police, Criminal, Police, Road, Highway Access, Elections, Party, Hail, Rain, Flood, Anniversary, Award, Month, Week End , Today, Yesterday, Female, Male, Family, Child, People.