POPLAR GROVE ILLINOIS NEWS AND BLOG


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Eldon Earl Kenworthy


To Eldon and Beverly were born Ann Marie Kenworthy (Don) Schroeder of Madison; Earl Junior (Nancy) Kenworhty of Poplar Grove, IL; and Marcia Lee Kenworthy who preceded him in death of breast cancer in 1986. Eldon and Beverly later divorced. Eldon also ...

Tax business owner, 3 workers and 4 clients charged in alleged scam of IRS


The seven-count indictment unsealed Wednesday seeks forfeiture of the $642,514 from Cordoba, 42, and her husband, Mario Cordoba, 47, of Crystal Lake, as well as employees Luisa Carbajal, 52, of Marengo and Alicia Arvalo, 48, of Poplar Grove and clients ...

Two-truck crash in town of Clinton slows Highway 67 traffic


The pickup truck driver was Nicholas Solmo, 51, of Poplar Grove, Illinois. The other driver, Hugo Montoya, 47, of Wheeling, Illinois, was not injured. The owner of Montoya's truck has contracted with a private company to clean up the spill. Rock County ...

Poplar Grove student named Intercollegiate Broadcasting System Awards finalist


POPLAR GROVE — Tony Jones of Poplar Grove is one of six students from Western Illinois University’s Department of Broadcasting named a finalist for the 75th Intercollegiate Broadcasting System Awards. Winners will be announced March 7 during a ...

Fire kills 1 at home in northern Illinois village


POPLAR GROVE, Ill. (AP) — A house fire in the northern Illinois village of Poplar Grove has killed one person. Fire Chief Gail Worley says it appears the victim was trying to escape the flames, which began in a family room of the home around 6 p.m ...

Fire kills 1 at northern Illinois home; authorities say it appears victim was trying to escape


POPLAR GROVE, Illinois — A house fire in the northern Illinois village of Poplar Grove has killed one person. Fire Chief Gail Worley says it appears the victim was trying to escape the flames, which began in a family room of the home around 6 p.m. Wednesday.

Sheriff: $100,000 in drugs seized in Illinois raid


POPLAR GROVE, Ill. (AP) _ Boone County authorities say a drug raid has led to one arrest and confiscation of more than $100,000 in marijuana. The Rockford Register Star reports federal, state and county authorities said Wednesday they raided a Poplar Grove ...

Sheriff: $100K in Drugs Seized in Illinois Raid


Federal, state and county authorities said Wednesday they raided a Poplar Grove residence Tuesday and discovered an indoor cannabis-growing operation in the basement. Authorities seized the cannabis, drug paraphernalia, packaging materials, a digital scale ...

Poplar Grove dog breeder euthanizes several dogs


A Poplar Grove dog breeder euthanizes several of his dogs after an investigation by the Illinois Department of Agriculture. We first told you about Christiansen Kennels in October. That's when the Department of Ag started looking into the place at 3968 ...

UPDATE: Man Taken into Custody After Poplar Grove Standoff


The Winnebago County Sheriff's Office, Belvidere and Illinois State police provided assistance. Before 2 a.m. Friday, the man was taken into custody without incident. UPDATE: The police standoff in Poplar Grove has been resolved. According to the Boone ...




SPECIAL INFORMATION FOR POPLAR GROVE

Make Your Health Benefits Work for You in POPLAR GROVE

The Department of Labor´s Employee Benefits Security Administration (EBSA) administers several important health benefit laws covering employer-based health plans. They govern your basic rights to information about how your health plan works, how to qualify for benefits, and how to make claims for benefits.

In addition, there are specific laws protecting your right to health benefits when you lose coverage or change jobs. EBSA also oversees health care laws covering special medical conditions. For more information on the laws that protect your benefits, see EBSA´s Website. Or call the agency toll free at 1-866-444-3272 to reach a regional office near you. These 10 tips can help make your health benefits work better for you.

1. Explore Your Options for Health Coverage

You have options for health coverage. There are many different types of health benefit plans. Find out what your employer offers, then check out the plan (or plans). Your employer´s human resource office, the health plan administrator, or your union can provide information to help you match your needs and preferences with the available plans. Or consider a health plan through the Health Insurance Marketplace. Visit HealthCare.gov to see the health plan options available in your area. Get information about all of your options and review it. The more information you have, the better your health care decisions will be.

2. Review the Benefits Available

Do the plans offered cover the benefits that are important to you, such as mental health services, well-baby care, vision or dental care? Are there deductibles? What are the out-of-pocket expenses you may face? Determine your needs and priorities. Compare all of your options before you decide which coverage to elect. Matching your needs and those of your family members will result in the best possible benefits. Cheapest may not always be best. Your goal is high quality health benefits.

3. Read Your Plan´s Summary Plan Description (SPD) for the Wealth of Information It Provides

Your health plan administrator should provide a copy. It outlines your benefits and your legal rights under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA), the Federal law that protects your health benefits. It also should contain information about the coverage of dependents, what services will require a co-payment or coinsurance, and the circumstances under which your employer can change or terminate a health benefits plan. You also can find many of the answers to your questions in the Summary of Benefits and Coverage (SBC), a short, easy-to-understand summary of what a plan covers and what it costs. You should receive a copy with your enrollment materials. Save the SPD, the SBC, and all other health plan brochures and documents, along with memos or correspondence from your employer relating to health benefits.

4. Use Your Health Coverage

Once your health coverage has started, use it to help cover medical costs for services like going to the doctor, filling prescriptions or getting emergency care. Using your benefits will help you and your family stay healthy and reduce your health care costs. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) provides many valuable protections for people enrolled in employment-based health plans including prohibiting preexisting condition exclusions and annual and lifetime limits on essential health benefits. What’s more, many plans cover certain preventive services for free, including routine vaccinations, regular well-baby and well-child visits, blood pressure, diabetes and cholesterol tests, and many cancer screenings. You also can keep your children on your health plan until age 26. Take advantage of your benefits, especially free preventive care if your plan covers it. If you were required to pay cost-sharing for a preventive service, check your Explanation of Benefits and ensure that the provider billed the service properly.

5. Understand Your Plan’s Mental Health and Substance Use Coverage

Many health plans provide coverage for mental health and substance use disorder benefits. If a plan does offer these benefits, the financial requirements (such as co-payments and deductibles) and the quantitative treatment limits (such as visit limits) for the mental health and substance use disorder benefits cannot be more restrictive than the financial requirements or treatment limits applied to medical/surgical benefits. Plans also cannot impose lifetime and annual limits on the dollar amount of mental health and substance use disorder services, including behavioral health treatment. Some plans cover preventive services like screenings for depression and child behavioral assessments for free. Check your SPD and SBC to find out what your plan covers.

6. Look For Wellness Programs

More employers are establishing wellness programs that encourage employees to work out, stop smoking, and generally adopt healthier lifestyles. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and the ACA encourage group health plans to adopt wellness programs but also includes protections for employees and dependents from impermissible discrimination based on a health factor. These programs often provide rewards such as cost savings as well as promoting good health. Check your SPD and SBC to see whether your plan offers a wellness program(s). If your plan does, find out what reward is offered and what you need to do to receive it.

7. Know How to File an Appeal if Your Health Benefits Claim is Denied

Understand your plan’s procedures for filing a claim for benefits and where to make appeals of the plan´s decisions. Pay attention to time limits – make sure you timely file claims and appeals and that the plan makes decisions on time. Keep records and copies of correspondence. Check your health benefits package and your SPD to determine who is responsible for handling problems with benefit claims. Contact EBSA for assistance if you are unable to obtain a response to your complaint.

8. Assess Your Benefits Coverage as Your Family Status Changes

Marriage, Porce, childbirth or adoption, the death of a spouse, and aging out of a parent’s health plan are life events that may signal a need to change your health benefits. You, your spouse, and your dependent children may be eligible for special enrollment into other employer health coverage or through the Health Insurance Marketplace. Even without life-changing events, the information provided by your employer should tell you how you can change benefits or switch plans. If you’re considering special enrollment, act quickly. You have 30 days after the life event to request special enrollment in other employer coverage or 60 days to select a plan in the Marketplace.

9. Be Aware that Changing Jobs and Other Work Events Can Affect Your Health Benefits

If you change employers or lose your job, you may need to find other health coverage. If you have a new job, consider enrolling in your new employer’s plan. Whether starting or losing a job, you may be eligible to special enroll in a spouse’s employer-sponsored plan or through the Health Insurance Marketplace. Under the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act – better known as COBRA – you, your covered spouse, and your dependent children may be eligible to continue coverage under your former employer-sponsored plan. This coverage is temporary (generally 18 to 36 months) and you may have to pay the entire premium plus a 2 percent administrative charge. Get information on your coverage options and compare. Be aware of the deadlines for deciding on coverage and find out when your new coverage will be effective.

10. Plan For Retirement

Before you retire, find out what health benefits, if any, extend to you and your spouse during your retirement years. Consult with your employer´s human resources office, your union, or the plan administrator. Check your SPD and other plan documents. Make sure there is no conflicting information among these sources about the benefits you will receive or the circumstances under which they can change or be eliminated. With this information in hand, you can make other important choices, like finding out if you are eligible for Medicare and Medigap insurance coverage. If you want to retire before you are eligible for Medicare and your employer does not provide health benefits in retirement, consider what you will do for health coverage. Your options may include enrolling in a spouse’s employer plan or in a Marketplace plan or temporarily continuing your employer coverage by electing COBRA. Planning for retirement includes planning for your health coverage in retirement. To find out more, read Taking the Mystery Out of Retirement Planning.

These Laws Can Help

  • The Employee Retirement Income Security Act – Offers protection for inPiduals enrolled in retirement, health, and other benefit plans sponsored by private-sector employers, and provides rights to information and a claims and appeals process for participants to get benefits from their plans.
  • The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act – Creates the Health Insurance Marketplace and provides protections for employment-based health coverage, including extending dependent coverage of children to age 26; prohibiting preexisting condition exclusions and prohibiting lifetime and annual limits on essential health benefits.
  • The Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act – Contains provisions giving certain former employees, retirees, spouses, and dependent children the right to purchase temporary continuation of group health plan coverage at group rates in specific instances.
  • The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act – Allows employees, their spouses and their dependents to enroll in employer-provided health coverage regardless of open enrollment periods if they lose coverage or in the event of marriage, birth, adoption or placement for adoption. Also prohibits discrimination in health care coverage.
  • The Women´s Health and Cancer Rights Act – Offers protections for breast cancer patients who elect breast reconstruction in connection with a mastectomy.
  • The Newborns´ and Mothers´ Health Protection Act – Provides rules on minimum coverage for hospital lengths of stay following childbirth.
  • The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act – Prohibits discrimination in group health plan premiums based on genetic information. Also, generally prohibits group health plans from requesting genetic information or requiring genetic tests.
  • The Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act and the Mental Health Parity Act – Requires parity in financial requirements and treatment limitations for mental health and substance use benefits with those for medical and surgical benefits.
  • The Children´s Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act – Allows special enrollment in a group health plan if an employee or dependents lose coverage under CHIP or Medicaid or are eligible for premium assistance under those programs.

For More Information

Visit the Employee Benefits Security Administration’s Website to view the following publications. To order copies or to request assistance from a benefits advisor, contact EBSA electronically or call toll free 1-866-444-3272.

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How can I prepare for breastfeeding before I give birth?

baby-breastfeedingTo prepare for breastfeeding, the most important thing you can do is have confidence in yourself and to plan ahead. Committing to breastfeeding starts with the conviction that you can do it! Other steps you can take to prepare for breastfeeding are:
  • Get good prenatal care, which can help you avoid early delivery. Babies born too early have more problems with breastfeeding.
  • Tell your doctor about your plans to breastfeed, and ask if the place where you plan to deliver your baby has the staff and setup to support successful breastfeeding. Some hospitals and birth centers have taken special steps to create the best possible environment for successful breastfeeding. These places are called Baby-Friendly Hospitals and Birth Centers.
  • Take a breastfeeding class. Pregnant women who comprehend about how to breastfeed are more likely to be successful at breastfeeding than those who do not. Breastfeeding classes offer pregnant women and their partners the chance to prepare and ask questions before the baby´s arrival.
  • Ask your doctor to recommend a lactation consultant. You can establish a contact with a lactation consultant before the baby comes so that you will have support ready after the baby is born.
  • Talk to your doctor about your health. Discuss any breast surgery or injury you may have had. If you have depression, or are taking supplements or medicines, talk with your doctor about treatments that can work with breastfeeding.
  • Tell your doctor that you would like to breastfeed as soon as possible after delivery. The sucking instinct is very strong within the baby´s first hour of life.
  • Talk to friends who have breastfed, or consider joining a breastfeeding support group.
  • Talk to fathers, partners, and other family members about how they can help you successfully breastfeed. Partners and family members can:
    • Support your breastfeeding by being kind and encouraging
    • Show their love and appreciation for all of the work that goes into breastfeeding
    • Be good listeners if you need to talk about any breastfeeding concerns you might have
    • Help make sure you have enough to drink and get enough rest
    • Help around the house
    • Take care of any other children who are at home
    • Give the baby love through playing and cuddling
  • Get the items you will need for breastfeeding, such as nursing bras, covers, and nursing pillows.
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6 Tips for Managing Portion Size

Eating healthy is about enjoying your food while also managing portion size. Most people eat and drink more than their bodies need especially when they are served larger portions. So, choosing smaller portions to begin with is important for maintaining your overall health and well-being.

Here are some tips to help you manage your portion size:

  1. Measure out 1 cup, 1/2 cup, or 1 ounce of some different foods onto the bowls, glasses, cups, and plates you usually use to see what these portion sizes look like on them.
    Remember:
    • 1/2 cup = light bulb
    • 1 cup = baseball
    • 1 oz. or 2 tbsp. = golf ball
    • 3 oz. of chicken or meat = deck of cards
    • 3 oz. fish = checkbook
  2. Eat you meals on a smaller plate. The smaller your plate, the smaller your portion.
  3. Finished your plate but think you’re still hungry? Wait 10 minutes before going back for seconds. You might not want them after all. If you do go back for seconds, aim for the same balance you had with your first serving and start with veggies.
  4. When ordering at a restaurant, ask for a take-home container as soon as your meal comes. Put half of the meal in the take-home container so you’re sure to let your stomach—instead of your eyes—be your guide. Or share the meal with a dining companion. Many restaurants offer a smaller or “appetizer size” of entrees, so when a smaller portion is available, go for it!
  5. Buy or portion out treats and snacks in small, single-serving bags or packages.
  6. Check out the food label for serving size info

Try This: Small changes like these can make a big difference. Commit to making at least one change to reduce your portion sizes this week.

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If people in the media cannot decide whether they are in the
business of reporting news or manufacturing propaganda,
it is all the more important that the public understand
that difference,and choose their news sources accordingly.
Thomas Sowell

Newsof.org. Selected the top stories of the city of POPLAR GROVE ILLINOIS. Political events, traffic accidents on highways, downtown events, neighborhoods and inside. Also researched local newspapers and social networks, as well as the site of City Hall. Crimes, are always subject to demand generally for information. Also the tragedies and disasters such as fires, floods, flooding, rain, hail and winds. Tags: Breaking News, POPLAR GROVE ILLINOIS, City, Indoors, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday , Friday, Saturday, Sunday, Car, Crash, Elections, Beating, Accident, Crime, Police, Criminal, Police, Road, Highway Access, Elections, Party, Hail, Rain, Flood, Anniversary, Award, Month, Week End , Today, Yesterday, Female, Male, Family, Child, People.