PORTAGEVILLE MISSOURI
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Latest News - PORTAGEVILLE MISSOURI

Rayburn Faulkner


He is survived by his wife Judy Faulkner; two daughters, Stacy Faulkner of Caraway and Kelli Bradfield and husband Toby of Portageville, Mo.; a sister and her husband, Myra and John Vail of Jonesboro; three grandchildren, Taylor Bradfield, Railey Bradfield ...

Portageville pitcher gets offer from Mizzou


Portageville pitcher Taylor Tiffany has received a scholarship offer from the University of Missouri, who is considered one of the premier softball programs in the country. Tiffany finished her junior year with a single-season state record 391 strikeouts ...

Portageville man killed in accident


PORTAGEVILLE, Mo. -- A motorcyclist was killed Saturday when his vehicle overturned. Bennie L. Hosford, 42, of Portageville was driving westbound on County Road 428, four-tenths of a mile east of Portageville at 6:10 p.m. Saturday when his motorcycle went ...

Portageville man dies in wreck in New Madrid County


The Highway Patrol says one person was killed in a wreck in New Madrid County, Missouri on Saturday night. According to the Missouri Highway Patrol, it happened around 6:10 p.m. It happened on County Road 428, four miles east of Portageville, Missouri.

Briefly: Portageville softball team books first trip to final four, beats Bowling Green 1-0


PORTAGEVILLE, Mo. - The Portageville Bulldogs softball team booked its first trip to the state final four in school history Saturday afternoon with a 1-0 home victory against Bowling Green in a Class 2 state quarterfinal. Portageville standout Taylor ...

2 Missouri men, 1 juvenile charged with murder of Pemiscot Co. man


According to Pemiscot County Sheriff Tommy Greenwell, members of the Pemiscot County Sheriff's Office, Missouri Highway Patrol Division of Drug and Crime Control, Portageville Police, Caruthersville Police, New Madrid County Sheriff's Office, Missouri Fire ...

Missouri earthquake near Portageville


WPSD-TV in Paducah reported that the epicenter registered southeast of Portageville, Mo. That area is in the New Madrid seismic zone, which the Geological Survey considers the most active zone in North America east of the Rocky Mountains. The station said ...

Portageville, MO Father Charged In Infant Son’s Death


(New Madrid County, MO) Investigators say a one-month-old child died of severe injuries and now his father is charged with second degree murder. It happened in Portageville, MO last week. 23-year-old Kade Stringfellow was arraigned in New Madrid County ...

Missouri Cotton Farmers Use Old Tactics to Fight a New Battle against Pigweed


The following story was written by a University of Missouri student as part of the 2011 Sonja Hillgren/Farm Journal Ag Journalism Field Reporting Institute. Learn more. By Katie Alaimo PORTAGEVILLE, Mo. — As a cool autumn night settled on the Missouri ...

Game Story


(February 21, 2009: Portageville, MO 63873) In Saturday's non-league outing, the Caruthersville Tigers (Caruthersville, MO) basketball squad overwhelmed the host Portageville Bulldogs (Portageville, MO), by a count of 74-39. The Tigers (5-17) will now ...

State police reports - Warsaw station


PRESS RELEASE July 25 – New York State Police in Warsaw while on patrol observed a vehicle fail to signal a turn off of Silver Lake Road in the Town of Perry. Following a traffic stop troopers arres…

Letchworth State Park — Castile, NY


Letchworth State Park - Castile, NY Castile, NY We woke up early and the forecast was for mid 80s and 50% chance of rain later in the morning but we decided to take our…
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SPECIAL INFORMATION FOR PORTAGEVILLE

Make Your Health Benefits Work for You in PORTAGEVILLE MISSOURI

The Department of Labor´s Employee Benefits Security Administration (EBSA) administers several important health benefit laws covering employer-based health plans. They govern your basic rights to information about how your health plan works, how to qualify for benefits, and how to make claims for benefits.

In addition, there are specific laws protecting your right to health benefits when you lose coverage or change jobs. EBSA also oversees health care laws covering special medical conditions. For more information on the laws that protect your benefits, see EBSA´s Website. Or call the agency toll free at 1-866-444-3272 to reach a regional office near you. These 10 tips can help make your health benefits work better for you.

1. Explore Your Options for Health Coverage

You have options for health coverage. There are many different types of health benefit plans. Find out what your employer offers, then check out the plan (or plans). Your employer´s human resource office, the health plan administrator, or your union can provide information to help you match your needs and preferences with the available plans. Or consider a health plan through the Health Insurance Marketplace. Visit HealthCare.gov to see the health plan options available in your area. Get information about all of your options and review it. The more information you have, the better your health care decisions will be.

2. Review the Benefits Available

Do the plans offered cover the benefits that are important to you, such as mental health services, well-baby care, vision or dental care? Are there deductibles? What are the out-of-pocket expenses you may face? Determine your needs and priorities. Compare all of your options before you decide which coverage to elect. Matching your needs and those of your family members will result in the best possible benefits. Cheapest may not always be best. Your goal is high quality health benefits.

3. Read Your Plan´s Summary Plan Description (SPD) for the Wealth of Information It Provides

Your health plan administrator should provide a copy. It outlines your benefits and your legal rights under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA), the Federal law that protects your health benefits. It also should contain information about the coverage of dependents, what services will require a co-payment or coinsurance, and the circumstances under which your employer can change or terminate a health benefits plan. You also can find many of the answers to your questions in the Summary of Benefits and Coverage (SBC), a short, easy-to-understand summary of what a plan covers and what it costs. You should receive a copy with your enrollment materials. Save the SPD, the SBC, and all other health plan brochures and documents, along with memos or correspondence from your employer relating to health benefits.

4. Use Your Health Coverage

Once your health coverage has started, use it to help cover medical costs for services like going to the doctor, filling prescriptions or getting emergency care. Using your benefits will help you and your family stay healthy and reduce your health care costs. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) provides many valuable protections for people enrolled in employment-based health plans including prohibiting preexisting condition exclusions and annual and lifetime limits on essential health benefits. What’s more, many plans cover certain preventive services for free, including routine vaccinations, regular well-baby and well-child visits, blood pressure, diabetes and cholesterol tests, and many cancer screenings. You also can keep your children on your health plan until age 26. Take advantage of your benefits, especially free preventive care if your plan covers it. If you were required to pay cost-sharing for a preventive service, check your Explanation of Benefits and ensure that the provider billed the service properly.

5. Understand Your Plan’s Mental Health and Substance Use Coverage

Many health plans provide coverage for mental health and substance use disorder benefits. If a plan does offer these benefits, the financial requirements (such as co-payments and deductibles) and the quantitative treatment limits (such as visit limits) for the mental health and substance use disorder benefits cannot be more restrictive than the financial requirements or treatment limits applied to medical/surgical benefits. Plans also cannot impose lifetime and annual limits on the dollar amount of mental health and substance use disorder services, including behavioral health treatment. Some plans cover preventive services like screenings for depression and child behavioral assessments for free. Check your SPD and SBC to find out what your plan covers.

6. Look For Wellness Programs

More employers are establishing wellness programs that encourage employees to work out, stop smoking, and generally adopt healthier lifestyles. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and the ACA encourage group health plans to adopt wellness programs but also includes protections for employees and dependents from impermissible discrimination based on a health factor. These programs often provide rewards such as cost savings as well as promoting good health. Check your SPD and SBC to see whether your plan offers a wellness program(s). If your plan does, find out what reward is offered and what you need to do to receive it.

7. Know How to File an Appeal if Your Health Benefits Claim is Denied

Understand your plan’s procedures for filing a claim for benefits and where to make appeals of the plan´s decisions. Pay attention to time limits – make sure you timely file claims and appeals and that the plan makes decisions on time. Keep records and copies of correspondence. Check your health benefits package and your SPD to determine who is responsible for handling problems with benefit claims. Contact EBSA for assistance if you are unable to obtain a response to your complaint.

8. Assess Your Benefits Coverage as Your Family Status Changes

Marriage, Porce, childbirth or adoption, the death of a spouse, and aging out of a parent’s health plan are life events that may signal a need to change your health benefits. You, your spouse, and your dependent children may be eligible for special enrollment into other employer health coverage or through the Health Insurance Marketplace. Even without life-changing events, the information provided by your employer should tell you how you can change benefits or switch plans. If you’re considering special enrollment, act quickly. You have 30 days after the life event to request special enrollment in other employer coverage or 60 days to select a plan in the Marketplace.

9. Be Aware that Changing Jobs and Other Work Events Can Affect Your Health Benefits

If you change employers or lose your job, you may need to find other health coverage. If you have a new job, consider enrolling in your new employer’s plan. Whether starting or losing a job, you may be eligible to special enroll in a spouse’s employer-sponsored plan or through the Health Insurance Marketplace. Under the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act – better known as COBRA – you, your covered spouse, and your dependent children may be eligible to continue coverage under your former employer-sponsored plan. This coverage is temporary (generally 18 to 36 months) and you may have to pay the entire premium plus a 2 percent administrative charge. Get information on your coverage options and compare. Be aware of the deadlines for deciding on coverage and find out when your new coverage will be effective.

10. Plan For Retirement

Before you retire, find out what health benefits, if any, extend to you and your spouse during your retirement years. Consult with your employer´s human resources office, your union, or the plan administrator. Check your SPD and other plan documents. Make sure there is no conflicting information among these sources about the benefits you will receive or the circumstances under which they can change or be eliminated. With this information in hand, you can make other important choices, like finding out if you are eligible for Medicare and Medigap insurance coverage. If you want to retire before you are eligible for Medicare and your employer does not provide health benefits in retirement, consider what you will do for health coverage. Your options may include enrolling in a spouse’s employer plan or in a Marketplace plan or temporarily continuing your employer coverage by electing COBRA. Planning for retirement includes planning for your health coverage in retirement. To find out more, read Taking the Mystery Out of Retirement Planning.

These Laws Can Help

  • The Employee Retirement Income Security Act – Offers protection for inPiduals enrolled in retirement, health, and other benefit plans sponsored by private-sector employers, and provides rights to information and a claims and appeals process for participants to get benefits from their plans.
  • The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act – Creates the Health Insurance Marketplace and provides protections for employment-based health coverage, including extending dependent coverage of children to age 26; prohibiting preexisting condition exclusions and prohibiting lifetime and annual limits on essential health benefits.
  • The Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act – Contains provisions giving certain former employees, retirees, spouses, and dependent children the right to purchase temporary continuation of group health plan coverage at group rates in specific instances.
  • The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act – Allows employees, their spouses and their dependents to enroll in employer-provided health coverage regardless of open enrollment periods if they lose coverage or in the event of marriage, birth, adoption or placement for adoption. Also prohibits discrimination in health care coverage.
  • The Women´s Health and Cancer Rights Act – Offers protections for breast cancer patients who elect breast reconstruction in connection with a mastectomy.
  • The Newborns´ and Mothers´ Health Protection Act – Provides rules on minimum coverage for hospital lengths of stay following childbirth.
  • The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act – Prohibits discrimination in group health plan premiums based on genetic information. Also, generally prohibits group health plans from requesting genetic information or requiring genetic tests.
  • The Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act and the Mental Health Parity Act – Requires parity in financial requirements and treatment limitations for mental health and substance use benefits with those for medical and surgical benefits.
  • The Children´s Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act – Allows special enrollment in a group health plan if an employee or dependents lose coverage under CHIP or Medicaid or are eligible for premium assistance under those programs.

For More Information

Visit the Employee Benefits Security Administration’s Website to view the following publications. To order copies or to request assistance from a benefits advisor, contact EBSA electronically or call toll free 1-866-444-3272.

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PORTAGEVILLE MISSOURI tspan:3m PORTAGEVILLE MISSOURI




The Guardian and a warning to PORTAGEVILLE MISSOURI: Jehovah´s Witnesses´ silencing techniques, as terrifying as child abuse

Growing up in a Jehovah’s Witness family is different. As a child, I didn’t celebrate birthdays, Christmas or July 4. Nor did I, or anyone I knew, mix with non-Witness families in Little League or Girl Scouts. Instead, I spent much of my time sharing the “good news.” I used to go door-to-door on my own with a big, strong, well liked man in my congregation, named Jonathan. I was just 9 and 10 when he repeatedly sexually abused me.

It is really hard for kids to speak up when they’re abused. But the Jehovah’s Witnesses make it a lot harder.

They have a “2 Witness” rule, which says that anyone who accuses an adult of abuse must have a second witness. If there is no second witness, the accuser is punished for a false accusation - usually by ordering that no Witness may talk with or associate with the “false” accuser. This is called dis-fellowshipping. For a kid raised only with other Witnesses, it was horrifying. Even your parents would have to ignore you. It was more terrifying than Jonathan.

It was the elders of my congregation who had assigned Jonathan to team up with me. When we separated from the others, he forced me into his pick-up truck and drove us to his house. Then he would say “Let’s play”. It happened too many times. Like everyone else in the congregation, my parents liked “Brother” Jonathan and trusted him in our family.

My parents were consumed with some really huge problems in those years, and later divorced. I was emotionally alone - and wanted to be the best Jehovah’s Witness I could be. That’s why I went out to field service - the door to door ministry that Witnesses are known for.

What my parents didn’t know, was that Jonathan had sexually molested another girl in our congregation. The elders knew this and had kept it a secret. They were following orders from Watchtower leaders, based in the world headquarters in New York, who in 1989 had issued a top-secret instruction to keep known child sex abusers in the congregations a secret. This instruction became Exhibit 1 at my civil trial.

The elders and the Governing Body all knew that child molesters hide in religious groups and often are people who are likeable and friendly - like Jonathan. They knew molesters would likely do it again. But they chose to ignore the safety of the kids, in favor of protecting their image - and their bank account - from lawsuits. It was all in that 1989 letter.

A recent report by the Center for Investigative Reporting revealed that they have continued to issues directives urging silence around child abuse. Last November, elders were instructed to avoid taking criminal matters like child abuse to the authorities. Instead, they were told to handle them internally in confidential committees. The report also showed that Jehovah’s Witnesses evoke the First Amendment to hide sex abuse claims.

It took me learning about Jonathan’s other victims for me to speak up. In 2009, I looked on California’s Megan’s Law website, the state’s official list of registered sex offenders. There, I found he had been convicted a few years before for sexually abusing another 8-year-old girl. I felt horribly guilty that I hadn’t spoken up about him earlier. Now, I need to stop predators from doing this again.

The only way to end this abuse is by lifting this veil of secrecy once and for all.

In http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/mar/02/jehovahs-witnesses-silencing-techniques-child-abuse [6]



Get a Homeland Security Job in PORTAGEVILLE MISSOURI

What You Need to Know

The Department of Homeland Security has unique career opportunities that will challenge your mind and reward your skills and talents. As a Homeland Security employee, you will help secure our borders, airports, seaports and waterways; research and develop the latest security technologies; respond to natural disasters or terrorists acts; and analyze intelligence reports.

Next Steps

  1. Find the Job Right for You. Find DHS jobs at dhs.usajobs.gov.

    You can also use USAJOBS through an Interactive Voice Response Telephone System
    phone: 703-724-1850
    TDD: 978-461-8404.

    From general mission support to law enforcement to immigration and travel security to prevention and response, exciting professional growth opportunities exist throughout the Department.

  • Mission support careers involve the following fields: medical, human resources, facilities, budget, procurement, science and technology, training, intelligence, planning and coordination, detection, civil rights, fraud detection and more.
  • Law enforcement careers offer positions in protection of the President, Vice President, their families, heads of state and other designated inpiduals; securing the nation’s borders and enforcing immigration laws; interagency law enforcement training; and enforcing economic, transportation and infrastructure security.
  • Immigration and travel security careers involve protecting the nation’s transportation systems, as well as overseeing lawful immigration to the U.S.
  • Prevention and response careers protect the public, environment and U.S. economic and security interests in any maritime region, as well as provide preparedness, protection, response, recovery and mitigation to reduce loss of life and property and protect the nation from all hazards are what these careers are all about.
  1. Read the Job Announcement. The announcement will provide you with information about job qualifications, duties, salary, duty location, benefits, and security requirements. Here you will be able to determine if your interests, education, and professional background make you a good candidate for the job.

A list of common terms is available to assist you in understanding Department job announcements.

Most Homeland Security jobs require U.S. citizenship and successful completion of a full background investigation and drug screening.

  1. Apply for the Job. Follow the instructions in the “How to Apply” section of each USAJOBS announcement (upper right tab). Instructions will guide you through the application process, providing you detailed information on the questions, forms, and format that must be addressed and used to capture your qualifications for the job. Submit all required documents and pay close attention to the application due date and application procedures, which will vary by job and the Department component.

    During the application process, veterans may be asked to identify Veterans Preference status.

    To post your resume online, apply to certain federal jobs, check on the status of your application, and receive automated job alerts, you must create a USAJOBS member account.

  2. Interview for the Job. The names of best-qualified candidates will be forwarded to the supervisor or hiring official. If you are one of the best-qualified candidates, the supervisor or hiring official may interview you in person or by telephone, or in rare cases may hire you based solely on your application materials. Selection procedures are subject to Federal Civil Service laws, which ensure that all applicants receive fair and equal treatment in the hiring process.

Tips

No matter where you are in your career - at the very beginning, transitioning to the federal government mid-career, or another stage in your professional life - the Department of Homeland Security has a place for you.

  • Student and Recent Graduate Job Opportunities - Learn about internships, fellowships and training programs available across the Department.
  • Experienced Professionals - Use your technical skills and management experience to contribute to the homeland security mission. Explore meaningful career opportunities today.
  • Retirees - The Department offers retirees meaningful work opportunities, including short- and long-term projects, on a part-time or flexible schedule.
  • Veterans - The Department is committed to recruiting and employing eligible veterans for suitable jobs.

LEARN MORE

Last Published Date: December 16, 2014

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Newsof.org. Selected the top stories of the city of PORTAGEVILLE MISSOURI. Political events, traffic accidents on highways, downtown events, neighborhoods and inside. Also researched local newspapers and social networks, as well as the site of City Hall. Crimes, are always subject to demand generally for information. Also the tragedies and disasters such as fires, floods, flooding, rain, hail and winds. Tags: Breaking News, PORTAGEVILLE MISSOURI, City, Indoors, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday , Friday, Saturday, Sunday, Car, Crash, Elections, Beating, Accident, Crime, Police, Criminal, Police, Road, Highway Access, Elections, Party, Hail, Rain, Flood, Anniversary, Award, Month, Week End , Today, Yesterday, Female, Male, Family, Child, People.