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Latest News - SELMA ALABAMA

Coventry Motofest and ten other unmissable events in Coventry and Warwickshire


...
of the pivotal moment in Martin Luther King Jr’s epic civil rights struggle – the 1965 protest march from Selma to Montgomery Alabama to secure voting rights for African Americans. Dr Martin Luther King Jr. is played by British actor David Oyelowo ...

Benjamin Cullen Nichols


Selma, AL, 36701 or Life Outreach International, P.O. Box 982000, Ft. Worth, TX, 76182-8000. You may go online to view obituaries, offer condolences and sign the guest book at http://www.selmafuneralho me.com.

Marriage in Alabama


This has been an eventful year. Thousands of tourists have flocked to Alabama to commemorate the 50th Anniversary of the Selma to Montgomery March for Civil and Voting Rights. The events that happened in Alabama spurred the enactment of the landmark acts ...

"Selma" Director Ava DuVernay: "The Best Creativity Happens Within Limits"


Selma director Ava DuVernay was the first female African-American ...
Even if I'm sitting with my oldest cousin out in the country in Alabama and no one else is around. No way that's boring. I'm going to sit there, I'm gonna watch what she does, I'm ...

Associated Press appoints Phillip Lucas news reporter based in Birmingham, Alabama


Among the coverage he's been involved in was the arrival of Ebola victims in Atlanta for treatment and the 50th anniversary of the "Bloody Sunday" voting rights march in Selma, Alabama. He also was among a team of reporters dispatched to Ferguson ...

Selma to Montgomery March


In early 1965, Martin Luther King Jr.’s Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) made Selma, Alabama, the focus of its efforts to register black voters in the South. That March, protesters attempting to march from Selma to the state capital of ...

Selma, Alabama: Fifty years later, the march that's still not over


Selma, Alabama was – and remains – a small southern town. One day in 1965, however, it became a global buzzword for repression against the just struggle for the right to vote by black American citizens. This past weekend, President Obama took part in ...

ON THE SCENE: 50 years ago in Selma, Alabama


Imagine that you are standing in front of a bridge getting ready to walk up and over where just a few weeks ago men and women, young and old, had been savagely beaten by the police. How would you feel? That's the situation Ellen Rocco, station manager of ...

U.S. high schools to receive free copy of 'Selma'


The movie depicts the march that Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. led from Selma, Alabama to Montgomery to secure equal voting rights for African-Americans. DVDs, which began shipping this month, will be sent to the principal's attention. "By providing DVDs to ...

Selma’ to Be Shown for Free in Selma, Alabama


In a gesture of appreciation, Paramount Pictures has decided to show civil rights drama “Selma” free of charge at the Selma Walton Theater in the city of Selma, Ala., beginning Jan. 9. “With deep gratitude to the people of Selma, Alabama, we are ...

Sarah Michelle Gellar, Selma Blair & Reese Witherspoon Had A Mini-’Cruel Intentions’ Reunion Last Night


Remember how Sarah Michelle Gellar shared a cute photo with her Buffy the Vampire Slayer co-star Alyson Hannigan a few days ago? Yeah, well, she kinda outdid herself last night when she met up with he…

Reese Witherspoon, Sarah Michelle Gellar And Selma Blair Have A Sexy Cruel Intentions Reunion! Oh Yes, There Was Kissing!


Ooo la la! We're pretty sure EVERYONE knows THAT kiss from Cruel Intentions. Well we've got news for you -- it happened AGAIN! Last night, there was a bit of a Cruel Intentions reunion when Reese Wi…

Sarah Michelle Gellar & Selma Blair Reenact 'Cruel Intentions' Kiss Alongside Reese Witherspoon!


Reese Witherspoon is sandwiched in between Sarah Michelle Gellar and Selma Blair while reuniting at a performance of The Unauthorized Musical Parody of Cruel Intentions on Thursday (May 28) at Rockwel…

Reese Witherspoon, Sarah Michelle Gellar and Selma Blair had a mini 'Cruel Intentions' reunion


How perfect is Reese’s third-wheel face? They may have been frenemies in the 1999 classic Cruel Intentions, but the movie’s three main ladies were enjoying each other’s company Thursday night. Reese …

Reese Witherspoon, Sarah Michelle Gellar & Selma Blair Have ‘Cruel Intentions’ Reunion!


Best Girls’ Night EVER. ‘Cruel Intentions’ co-stars Reese Witherspoon, Sarah Michelle Gellar, and Selma Blair got together last night! They went to see ‘Cruel Intentions the Musical.’ RELATED: Reese …

Reese Witherspoon, Selma Blair, & Sarah Michelle Gellar Have Epic 'Cruel Intentions' Reunion


Check out Reese Witherspoon, Selma Blair, and Sarah Michelle Gellar posing for a sweet pic together, which was posted on Instagram! “Best girls night of the year!!! #cruelintentions,” Reese, 39, capt…

Selma Blair Takes a Break From Portraying Kris Jenner


Selma Blair lets her long hair hide her face as she stops by Bristol Farms for some groceries on Tuesday afternoon (May 26) in West Hollywood, Calif. Earlier in the month, the 42-year-old actress was…

HBO’s ‘Nightingale': David Oyelowo Dazzles in an Astonishing One-Man Performance


All things considered, it’s pretty silly to get worked up over the snubs and slights of the Oscars — it’s an awards ceremony that just plain gets things wrong, and always has. But it still rankled mos…

"You brought up stories, and how important stories are. There was a moment in Selma which I really...
"


“You brought up stories, and how important stories are. There was a moment in Selma which I really loved where they were talking about how our story of slavery has been so hijacked from us. And that h…

UW-Eau Claire students learn civil rights history by experiencing it in Selma, Alabama


By Nick Erickson:




SPECIAL INFORMATION FOR SELMA

Advices to people with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in SELMA ALABAMA

What is irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)?

Irritable bowel syndrome* (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder, meaning that the symptoms are caused by changes in how the GI tract works. The GI tract is a series of hollow organs joined in a long, twisting tube from the mouth to the anus—the opening where stool leaves your body. Food is digested, or broken down, in the GI tract.

The organs of the GI tract

*See the Pronunciation Guide for tips on how to say words in bold type.

IBS is a group of symptoms that occur together, not a disease. Symptoms can come and go repeatedly without signs of damage to the GI tract.

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What are the symptoms of IBS?

The most common symptoms of IBS include pain or discomfort in your abdomen—the area between your chest and hips—and changes in your bowel habits. The pain or discomfort of IBS may be reported as cramping and

  • starts when you have bowel movements more or less often than usual
  • starts when your stool appears looser and more watery or harder and more lumpy than usual
  • goes away after a bowel movement

The changes in bowel habits with IBS may be diarrhea, constipation, or both.

Symptoms of diarrhea are

  • passing stools three or more times a day
  • having loose, watery stools
  • feeling an urgent need to have a bowel movement

Symptoms of constipation are

  • passing fewer than three stools in a week
  • having hard, dry stools
  • straining to have a bowel movement

Some people with IBS have only diarrhea or only constipation. Some people have symptoms of both diarrhea and constipation or have diarrhea sometimes and constipation other times. People often have symptoms after eating a meal.

Other symptoms of IBS are

  • whitish mucus—a clear liquid made by the intestines—in the stool
  • a swollen or bloated abdomen
  • the feeling that you haven’t finished a bowel movement

Women with IBS often have more symptoms during their menstrual periods.

IBS is a chronic disorder, meaning it lasts a long time, often years. However, the symptoms may come and go. You may have IBS if

  • you have had symptoms at least three times a month for the past 3 months
  • your symptoms first started at least 6 months ago

While IBS can be painful, it doesn’t lead to other health problems or damage the GI tract.

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What causes IBS?

Doctors are not sure what causes IBS. Researchers are studying the following possible causes of IBS:

  • Brain-gut signal problems. Signals between your brain and the nerves of your gut, or small and large intestines, control how your gut works. Problems with brain-gut signals may cause IBS symptoms, such as changes in your bowel habits and pain or discomfort.
  • Colon muscle problems. The muscles of your colon, part of your large intestine, may not work normally. The muscles may contract, or tighten, too much. These contractions may move stool through your gut too quickly, causing cramping and diarrhea during or shortly after a meal, or slow the movement of stool, causing constipation.
  • Sensitive nerves. The nerves in your gut may be extra sensitive, causing you to feel more pain or discomfort than normal when gas or stool is in the gut.
  • Mental health issues. Psychological, or mental health, issues such as anxiety or depression may be related to IBS in some people. Stress can make the nerves of your gut more sensitive, causing more discomfort and emotional distress.
  • Infections. A bacterial infection in the GI tract may cause some people to develop IBS.
  • Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Normally, few bacteria live in the small intestine. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth is an increase in the number or a change in the type of bacteria in the small intestine. These bacteria can produce extra gas and may also cause diarrhea and weight loss. Some researchers believe small intestinal bacterial overgrowth may lead to IBS; however, more research is needed to show a link between the two conditions.
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How is IBS diagnosed?

Your doctor may be able to diagnose IBS based on your symptoms. Your doctor may not need to do medical tests or may do a limited number of tests.

Your doctor will ask about your

  • medical history
  • eating habits
  • medicine use

Your doctor will look for a certain pattern in your symptoms. Your doctor can diagnose IBS by using symptom-based standards such as the Rome criteria. Based on the Rome criteria, IBS may be diagnosed if

  • your symptoms started at least 6 months ago
  • you have had abdominal pain or discomfort at least three times a month for the past 3 months
  • your abdominal pain or discomfort has two or three of the following features:
    • Your pain or discomfort improves after a bowel movement.
    • When your pain or discomfort starts, you notice a change in how often you have a bowel movement.
    • When your pain or discomfort starts, you notice a change in the way your stools look.

Your doctor will also conduct a physical exam and may perform blood tests to make sure you don’t have other health problems. IBS can have the same symptoms as other health problems, so more tests may be needed. If any blood tests suggest you may have another health problem, your doctor might also perform the following tests:

  • Stool test. A stool test is used to check stool for blood or parasites, which are tiny organisms found in contaminated food or water. Your doctor will give you a container for catching and storing the stool. You will return the stool sample to your doctor or a commercial facility. The sample will be sent to a lab to check for blood or parasites. Your doctor may also check for blood in stool by examining your rectum—the lower end of the large intestine leading to the anus—during your physical exam.
  • Flexible sigmoidoscopy. Flexible sigmoidoscopy is used to look inside your rectum and lower colon. This test is used to look inside the rectum and lower colon. The test is performed at a hospital or an outpatient center by a gastroenterologist—a doctor who specializes in digestive diseases. Anesthesia is usually not needed. Your doctor will give you written bowel prep instructions to follow at home before the test. You may need to follow a clear liquid diet for 1 to 3 days before the test. You may also need a laxative or enema the night before the test. You may also have one or more enemas about 2 hours before the procedure.

    For the test, you will lie on a table while the doctor inserts a flexible tube into your anus. A small camera on the tube sends a video image of the intestinal lining to a computer screen. The test can show problems in the rectum or lower colon that may be causing your symptoms.

    You can usually go back to your normal diet after the test, though you may have cramping or bloating during the first hour after the test.
  • Colonoscopy. Colonoscopy is used to look inside your rectum and entire colon. The test is performed at a hospital or an outpatient center by a gastroenterologist. You’ll be given a light sedative and possibly pain medicine to help you relax. Your doctor will give you written bowel prep instructions to follow at home before the test. You may need to follow a clear liquid diet for 1 to 3 days before the test. You may need to take laxatives and enemas the evening before the test.

    For the test, you will lie on a table while the doctor inserts a flexible tube into your anus. A small camera on the tube sends a video image of the intestinal lining to a computer screen. The test can show problems in your colon that may be causing your symptoms.

    Cramping or bloating may occur during the first hour after the test. Driving is not permitted for 24 hours after the test so that the sedative can wear off. Before the appointment, you should make plans for a ride home. By the next day, you should fully recover and go back to your normal diet.
[Top]

How is IBS treated?

Irritable bowel syndrome is treated by relieving symptoms through

  • changes in eating, diet, and nutrition
  • medicine
  • probiotics
  • psychological therapy

You may have to try a few treatments to see what works best for you. Your doctor can help you find the right treatment plan.

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Eating, Diet, and Nutrition

Eating large meals can cause cramping and diarrhea in some people with IBS. If you experience these symptoms, try to change your eating patterns by eating four or five small meals a day.

Certain foods or drinks may make symptoms worse, such as

  • foods high in fat
  • some milk products
  • drinks with alcohol or caffeine
  • drinks with large amounts of artificial sweeteners, which are used in place of sugar
  • beans, cabbage, and other foods that may cause gas

To find out if certain foods trigger your symptoms, keep a diary and track

  • what you eat during the day
  • what symptoms you have
  • when symptoms occur

Take your notes to your doctor and talk about which foods seem to make your symptoms worse. You may need to avoid these foods or eat less of them.

Fiber may improve constipation symptoms caused by IBS because it makes stool soft and easier to pass. Fiber is found in foods such as whole-grain breads and cereals, beans, fruits, and vegetables. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommends that adults consume 21 to 38 grams of fiber a day.

While fiber may help constipation, it may not be enough to treat the abdominal discomfort or pain of IBS. In fact, some people with IBS may feel a bit more abdominal discomfort after adding more fiber to their diet. Add foods with fiber a little at a time to let your body get used to them. Too much fiber at once can cause gas, which can trigger symptoms in people with IBS.

[Top]

Medicine

Your doctor may give you medicine help relieve symptoms. Follow your doctor’s instructions when you use medicine to treat IBS. Talk with your doctor about possible side effects and what to do if you have them.

These medicines can lessen the symptoms of IBS:

  • Laxatives treat constipation. Many kinds of laxatives are available. Your doctor can help you find the right laxative for you.
  • Loperamide (Imodium) treats diarrhea.
  • Antispasmodics help reduce muscle spasms in the intestines and help ease abdominal pain.
  • Antidepressants in low doses can help relieve IBS symptoms.
  • Lubiprostone (Amitiza) is prescribed for people who have IBS with constipation.
  • Linaclotide (Linzess) is also prescribed for people who have IBS with constipation.

The antibiotic rifaximin can reduce bloating by treating small intestinal bacterial overgrowth; however, scientists are still debating the use of antibiotics to treat IBS and more research is needed.

Probiotics

Probiotics are live microorganisms—tiny organisms that can be seen only with a microscope. These microorganisms, most often bacteria, are like the microorganisms normally found in your GI tract. Studies have found that probiotics taken in large enough amounts improve symptoms of IBS; however, more research is needed. Probiotics can be found in dietary supplements, such as capsules, tablets, and powders, and in some foods, such as yogurt. Talk with your doctor before using probiotics, supplements, or any other complementary or alternative medical treatment. Read more at www.nccam.nih.gov/health/probiotics.

Psychological Therapy

Psychological therapy can help improve IBS symptoms.

  • Talk therapy. Talk therapy may reduce stress and improve IBS symptoms. Two types of talk therapy used to treat IBS are cognitive behavioral therapy and psychodynamic, or interpersonal, therapy. Cognitive behavioral therapy focuses on your thoughts and actions. Psychodynamic therapy focuses on how your emotions affect your IBS symptoms.
  • Gut-directed hypnotherapy. In hypnotherapy, a therapist may help relax the muscles in your colon by putting you into a trancelike state.
  • Mindfulness training. Mindfulness training can teach you to focus your attention on sensations occurring at the moment and to avoid catastrophizing, or worrying about the meaning of those sensations.
[Top]

Does stress cause IBS?

Although stress does not cause IBS, if you already have IBS, stress can make your symptoms worse. In addition, simply having IBS symptoms can produce stress.

Learning to reduce stress can help improve IBS. With less stress, you may find you have less cramping and pain. You may also find it easier to manage your symptoms.

Meditation, exercise, hypnosis, and counseling may help lessen IBS symptoms. Getting enough sleep and changing life situations to make them less stressful may also help. You may need to try different activities to see what works best for you.

[Top]

Points to Remember

  • Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder, meaning symptoms are caused by changes in how the GI tract works.
  • IBS is a group of symptoms that occur together, not a disease. Symptoms can come and go repeatedly without signs of damage to the GI tract.
  • The most common symptoms of IBS include pain or discomfort in your abdomen—the area between your chest and hips—and changes in your bowel habits.
  • While IBS can be painful, it doesn’t lead to other health problems or damage the GI tract.
  • Doctors are not sure what causes IBS. Researchers are studying the following possible causes of IBS:
    • brain-gut signal problems
    • colon muscle problems
    • sensitive nerves
    • mental health issues
    • infections
    • small intestinal bacterial overgrowth
  • Your doctor may be able to diagnose IBS based on your symptoms. Your doctor may not need to do medical tests or may do a limited number of tests.
  • IBS is treated by relieving symptoms through
    • changes in eating, diet, and nutrition
    • medicine
    • probiotics
    • psychological therapy
  • Although stress does not cause IBS, if you already have IBS, stress can make your symptoms worse.
[Top]

Hope through Research

The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases’ (NIDDK’s) pision of Digestive Diseases and Nutrition conducts and supports basic and clinical research into many digestive disorders.

Clinical trials are research studies involving people. Clinical trials look at safe and effective new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. Researchers also use clinical trials to look at other aspects of care, such as improving the quality of life for people with chronic illnesses. To learn more about clinical trials, why they matter, and how to participate, visit the NIH Clinical Research Trials and You website at www.nih.gov/health/clinicaltrials. For information about current studies, visit www.ClinicalTrials.gov.

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Pronunciation Guide

abdomen (AB-doh-men)

abdominal (ab-DOM-ih-nuhl)

antidepressants (AN-tee-dee-PRESS-uhnts)

antispasmodics (AN-tee-spaz-MOD-iks)

anus (AY-nuhss)

chronic (KRON-ik)

cognitive (KOG-nih-tiv)

colon (KOH-lon)

colonoscopy (KOH-lon-OSS-kuh-pee)

constipation (KON-stih-PAY-shuhn)

diarrhea (DY-uh-REE-uh)

enema (EN-uh-muh)

flexible sigmoidoscopy (FLEK-suh-buhl) (SIG-moy-DOSS-kuh-pee)

functional (FUHNK-shuhn-uhl)

gastroenterologist (GASS-troh-EN-tur-OL-uh-jist)

gastrointestinal (GASS-troh-in-TESS-tin-uhl)

hypnotherapy (HIP-noh-THAIR-uh-pee)

interpersonal (IN-tur-PUR-suhn-uhl)

intestines (in-TESS-tinz)

irritable bowel syndrome (IHR-ih-tuh-buhl) (boul) (SIN-drohm)

laxative (LAK-suh-tiv)

mucus (MYOO-kuhss)

probiotics (PROH-by-OT-iks)

psychodynamic (SY-koh-dy-NAM-ik)

psychological (SY-koh-LOJ-ih-kuhl)

[Top]

For More Information

American Neurogastroenterology and Motility Society
45685 Harmony Lane
Belleville, MI 48111
Phone: 734–699–1130
Fax: 734–699–1136
Email: admin@motilitysociety.org
Internet: www.motilitysociety.org

International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders
700 West Virginia Street, Suite 201
Milwaukee, WI 53204
Phone: 1–888–964–2001 or 414–964–1799
Fax: 414–964–7176
Email: iffgd@iffgd.org
Internet: www.iffgd.org

Rome Foundation, Inc.
P.O. Box 6524
Raleigh, NC 27628
Phone: 919–539–3051
Fax: 919–900–7646
Email: mpickard@theromefoundation.org
Internet: www.romecriteria.org

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Acknowledgments

Publications produced by the Clearinghouse are carefully reviewed by both NIDDK scientists and outside experts. This publication was reviewed by Douglas A. Drossman, M.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Thank you also to the Salvation Army, SE Corps, Washington, D.C., for facilitating field-testing of the original version of this publication.

The U.S. Government does not endorse or favor any specific commercial product or company. Trade, proprietary, or company names appearing in this document are used only because they are considered necessary in the context of the information provided. If a product is not mentioned, the omission does not mean or imply that the product is unsatisfactory.

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National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse

2 Information Way
Bethesda, MD 20892–3570
Phone: 1–800–891–5389
TTY: 1–866–569–1162
Fax: 703–738–4929
Email: nddic@info.niddk.nih.gov
Internet: www.digestive.niddk.nih.gov

The National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NDDIC) is a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). The NIDDK is part of the National Institutes of Health of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Established in 1980, the Clearinghouse provides information about digestive diseases to people with digestive disorders and to their families, health care professionals, and the public. The NDDIC answers inquiries, develops and distributes publications, and works closely with professional and patient organizations and Government agencies to coordinate resources about digestive diseases.

This publication is not copyrighted. The Clearinghouse encourages users of this publication to duplicate and distribute as many copies as desired.

This publication may contain information about medications and, when taken as prescribed, the conditions they treat. When prepared, this publication included the most current information available. For updates or for questions about any medications, contact the U.S. Food and Drug Administration toll-free at 1–888–INFO–FDA (1–888–463–6332) or visit www.fda.gov. Consult your health care provider for more information.


NIH Publication No. 13–4686
September 2013

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Page last updated October 16, 2013

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SELMA ALABAMA tspan:3m SELMA ALABAMA




Domestic violence in SELMA ALABAMA

Does your partner ever….

> Embarrass you with put-downs?

> Control what you do, who you see or talk to or where you go?

> Look at you or act in ways that scare you?

> Push you, slap you, choke you or hit you?

> Stop you from seeing your friends or family members?

> Control the money in the relationship? Take your money or Social Security check, make you ask for money or refuse to give you money?

> Make all of the decisions?

> Tell you that you’re a bad parent or threaten to take away your children?

> Prevent you from working or attending school?

> Act like the abuse is no big deal, deny the abuse or tell you it’s your own fault?

> Destroy your property or threaten to kill your pets?

> Intimidate you with guns, knives or other weapons?

> Attempt to force you to drop criminal charges?

> Threaten to commit suicide, or threaten to kill you?

If you answered ‘yes’ to even one of these questions, you may be in an unhealthy or abusive relationship. Don’t hesitate to chat or call to 1-800-799-SAFE if anything you read raises a red flag about your own relationship or that of someone you know.

For over 17 years, the National Domestic Violence Hotline has been the vital link to safety for women, men, children and families affected by domestic violence. With the help of our dedicated advocates and staff, we respond to calls 24/7, 365 days a year.

We provide confidential, one-on-one support to each caller and chatter, offering crisis intervention, options for next steps and direct connection to sources for immediate safety. Our database holds over 5,000 agencies and resources in communities all across the country. Bilingual advocates are on hand to speak with callers, and our Language Line offers translations in 170+ different languages.

The Hotline is an excellent source of help for concerned friends, family, co-workers and others seeking information and guidance on how to help someone they know. We work to educate communities all over through events, campaigns, and dynamic partnerships with companies ranging from The Avon Foundation to Verizon. Today, The Hotline is continuing to grow and explore new avenues of service.

http://www.thehotline.org/

[0]




Health Insurance Market in SELMA ALABAMA

From January 2014 is effective Health Insurance Market , which is designed to help you find the insurance that best suits your budget and needs of health coverage suits. Each health plan included in the new market will provide comprehensive coverage: doctor visits, medicines, hospital services, preventive services and more. It will also be possible to compare all the health insurance options based on price, benefits and other features that may be important to you.

Who is eligible to use the Health Insurance Market?

Anyone can use the Health Insurance Market to explore their options for health coverage, even if you have insurance.

The following are the only requirements to obtain insurance through this new market:

Live in America

-become naturalized US citizen or native, or lawful permanent resident

-not be in jail

Learn more about who may register in the Health Insurance Market.

Each state will have its own insurance market. Some states already provide information on the Health Insurance Market. See if it is the case in your state .

Learn about the 10 essential health benefits plans offered all Market.

Registration Process in Medical Insurance Market

From October 2013 you can get information about all the plans available in your area. You can also register directly online or by phone toll-free hotline to be appointed for this service.

If you have difficulty finding a plan that fits your needs and budget, there will be people available to help you explore your options for coverage. The help you receive from these people is completely unbiased. These wizards are not related to any particular plan or receive any commission (compensation) in relation to health plans available.

Learn more about how to prepare for the registration process .

Free or low-cost care

If you do not have or can not afford health insurance, there are options for you to receive free or low-cost care. Learn about the resources available to meet the health care options you need.

Options private health insurance with low premiums

Medicaid and Medicare

Community Health Centers

Know where to receive care if you have no health insurance

Free health insurance or affordable for children

The Health Insurance Program for children provides low-cost health coverage for children of families who earn too much to qualify for Medicaid coverage and who can not afford health insurance revenue Private. The CHIP program is a state and federal partnership that works in conjunction with Medicaid.

Each state operates a CHIP, but most states have unique names for their programs as Child Health Plus (New York), Healthy Families (California) and Hoosier Healthwise (Indiana). In several states, the CHIP and Medicaid are combined into one program.

What you need to know about CHIP:

Basic requirements for eligibility for CHIP : children up to age 19 in families with incomes up to $ 44.100 per year (for a family of four) are likely to receive coverage. In many states children from families with higher incomes may also be eligible.

Eligibility and Pregnancy : Pregnant women may be eligible for CHIP. Coverage for Moms generally includes laboratory tests and costs of labor and at least 60 days post-partum care.

States citizenship and immigration : the CHIP covers US citizens and certain legal immigrants. States have the option to cover children and pregnant women residing legally in EE. UU. The undocumented immigrants are not eligible for CHIP.

For information about health coverage programs Medicaid and CHIP in your state, visit the programs in your state , or call 1-877-543-7669.

It charges: health coverage option if you lost your job

If you do not already have medical coverage that gave your employer may have the option of keeping it through the program "continuation coverage", better known as COBRA.

This program allows you and your family to maintain health insurance he received while employed for a limited time after it stopped working time. When your employer stops paying COBRA is likely that you need to pay the full cost of the monthly premium.

What you need to know about COBRA coverage:

-Overall COBRA requirements apply only to employers with 20 or more employees. Many states have laws similar to COBRA that apply to employers with fewer than 20 employees. Contact the Department of Insurance in your state (in English) to find out if the "continuation coverage by the state" applies to your case.

-If your family was under the employer coverage, this coverage may also be eligible for COBRA.

-In most cases you should receive a notice of benefits administrator or health plan from your employer stating that your coverage is ending and offering the right to COBRA.

-In most cases you have 60 days after your last day of coverage to enroll in COBRA.

-Generally the program lasts 18 months but could last up to 36 months.

For more information about call COBRA benefits administrator of your employer and learn about their specific through this program options.

-If the coverage of your health plan was through a private employer (not a government employer), you can visit the website of the Department of Labor or call 1-866-444-3272.

-If the coverage of your health plan was through an employer state or local government, you can call 1-877-267-2323, extension 61565.

-If the coverage of your health plan had as an employee of the federal government, you can visit the website of the Office of Personnel Management (in English). [11]










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If people in the media cannot decide whether they are in the
business of reporting news or manufacturing propaganda,
it is all the more important that the public understand
that difference,and choose their news sources accordingly.
Thomas Sowell

Newsof.org. Selected the top stories of the city of SELMA ALABAMA. Political events, traffic accidents on highways, downtown events, neighborhoods and inside. Also researched local newspapers and social networks, as well as the site of City Hall. Crimes, are always subject to demand generally for information. Also the tragedies and disasters such as fires, floods, flooding, rain, hail and winds. Tags: Breaking News, SELMA ALABAMA, City, Indoors, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday , Friday, Saturday, Sunday, Car, Crash, Elections, Beating, Accident, Crime, Police, Criminal, Police, Road, Highway Access, Elections, Party, Hail, Rain, Flood, Anniversary, Award, Month, Week End , Today, Yesterday, Female, Male, Family, Child, People.