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Latest News - SEWARD NEBRASKA

Seward welcomes Obihiro sister-city exchange


Seward's student exchange program with Sister-City, Obihiro, Japan, is underway once again. The program is in its 43rd year, and thus far more than 250 local students have visited Japan to learn about a different culture, its values and traditions.

Video: Cattle Market Analysis With Mike Briggs


Mike Briggs, feedlot manager from Seward, Nebraska, analyzes the inventory numbers. Mike also explains how market prices are impacting feedlot margins.

Tiemann elected new US Grains Council chairman


All these areas have been key in making the Council the successful organization it is today.” Tiemann farms in Seward, Nebraska, and has spent more than 35 years in production agriculture. An at-large director and past chairman for the Nebraska Corn ...

New art exhibit opens Thursday


“His pieces are incredibly beautiful and detailed, especially given that he works in watercolor.” Growing up in Seward County, Nebraska, and attending Milford Public Schools, Wurst has been influenced by rural Nebraska, and the Midwest lifestyl

Seward farmer chosen to lead U.S. Grains Council


Tiemann, who has farmed in the Seward area for 35 years, is a current at-large member and past chairman of the Nebraska Corn Board and also has served as chairman of the Nebraska Grain Sorghum board. He has served as a delegate to the U.S. Grains Council ...

Nebraska Farmer Will Lead U.S. Grains Council


The U.S. Grains Council has elected a new chairman. Alan Tiemann, a farmer from Nebraska, was voted into the spot. Tiemann farms in Seward, Nebraska, and has spent more than 35 years in production agriculture. He is an at-large director and past chairman ...

Students teach English in Shenzhen summer camp


SEWARD -- Concordia University, Nebraska students are teaching English and American culture to students in grades kindergarten through eighth at Buena Vista Concordia International School during two three-week camps this summer, scheduled for June 22-July ...

Nebraskan will chair the U.S. Grains Council


Nebraska farmer Alan Tiemann has been elected chairman of the U.S. Grains Council at the organization’s annual board of delegates meeting in Montreal, Canada. Tiemann farms near Seward, Nebraska, and has spent more than 35 years in production agriculture.

From famine to prairie fires: Speaker shares history of Nebraska immigrants


Mariah Monahan crossed the ocean from Ireland in 1845 to settle in Nebraska. Her family was forced out of its homeland when the potatoes rotted and turned to mush in the ground, leaving nothing for them to eat. Monahan, portrayed by Humanities Nebraska ...

Watercolor artist exhibit opens Thursday at WNAC


The exhibit called “Rural Connections” will feature watercolor landscapes, wildlife and other rural Nebraska inspirations by artist Lance Wurst. Wurst grew up in Seward County Nebraska and attended Milford Public Schools. His paintings are realistic ...

Alaska Halibut Salmon Fishing Sport In Seward


fishing charters Fishing charters are great for anyone that loves fishing. Some of the best fishing charters in the world come out of Galveston. In fact, there are so many different fishing charters …

Troopers: 1 dead, others injured, in Alaska highway crash


Alaska State Troopers say one person is dead and numerous others are injured in a highway crash involving at least seven vehicles, including a tour bus. Troopers say the crash occurred Friday on the …
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SPECIAL INFORMATION FOR SEWARD

Victms of discrimination in SEWARD NEBRASKA

The EEOC enforces the prohibitions against employment discrimination in Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Equal Pay Act of 1963, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967, Sections 501 and 505 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Titles I and V of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), Title II of the Genetic Information Non-discrimination Act (GINA), and the Civil Rights Act of 1991. These laws prohibit discrimination based on race, color, sex, religion, national origin, age, disability, and genetic information, as well as reprisal for protected activity. The Commission´s interpretations of these statutes apply to its adjudication and enforcement in federal sector as well as private sector and state and local government employment.

The EEOC has held that discrimination against an inpidual because that person is transgender (also known as gender identity discrimination) is discrimination because of sex and therefore is covered under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. See Macy v. Department of Justice, EEOC Appeal No. 0120120821 (April 20, 2012), http://www.eeoc.gov/decisions/0120120821%20Macy%20v%20DOJ%20ATF.txt. The Commission has also found that claims by lesbian, gay, and bisexual inpiduals alleging sex-stereotyping state a sex discrimination claim under Title VII. See Veretto v. U.S. Postal Service, EEOC Appeal No. 0120110873 (July 1, 2011), http://www.eeoc.gov/decisions/0120110873.txt; Castello v. U.S. Postal Service, EEOC Request No. 0520110649 (Dec. 20, 2011), http://www.eeoc.gov/decisions/0520110649.txt.

While discrimination based on an inpidual´s status as a parent (prohibited under Executive Order 13152) is not a covered basis under the laws enforced by the EEOC, there are circumstances where discrimination against caregivers may give rise to sex discrimination under Title VII or disability discrimination under the ADA. See Enforcement Guidance: Unlawful Disparate Treatment of Workers with Caregiving Responsibilities, www.eeoc.gov/policy/docs/caregiving.html.

Federal government employees may file claims of discrimination under the Part 1614 EEO process on any of the bases covered under the laws EEOC enforces, and/or may also utilize additional complaint procedures described below.

Civil Service Reform Act

The Civil Service Reform Act of 1978 (CSRA), as amended, also protects federal government applicants and employees from discrimination in personnel actions (see "Prohibited Personnel Practices" http://www.opm.gov/ovrsight/proidx.asp) based on race, color, sex, religion, national origin, age, disability, marital status, political affiliation, or on conduct which does not adversely affect the performance of the applicant or employee -- which can include sexual orientation or transgender (gender identity) status. The Office of Special Counsel (OSC), www.osc.gov, and the Merit Systems Protection Board (MSPB), www.mspb.gov, enforce the prohibitions against federal employment discrimination codified in the CSRA. For more information, see OPM´s Addressing Sexual Orientation Discrimination in Federal Civilian Employment at www.opm.gov/er/address2/guide01.htm, OPM´s Guidance Regarding the Employment of Transgender Inpiduals in the Federal Workplace at www.opm.gov/persity/Transgender/Guidance.asp, and OSC´s Prohibited Personnel Practices and How to File a Complaint at http://www.osc.gov/ppp.htm.

Executive Orders

Additionally, federal agencies retain procedures for making complaints of discrimination on any bases prohibited by Executive Orders reviewed below. For example, some lesbian, gay, and bisexual employees may file complaints under both the agency´s Executive Order complaint process (for sexual orientation discrimination) and 1614 process (for sex discrimination), as these are separate processes.

Executive Order 11478, section 1 (as amended by Executive Orders 13087 and 13152) provides:

It is the policy of the government of the United States to provide equal opportunity in federal employment for all persons, to prohibit discrimination in employment because of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, handicap, age, sexual orientation or status as a parent, and to promote the full realization of equal employment opportunity through a continuing affirmative program in each executive department and agency. This policy of equal opportunity applies to and must be an integral part of every aspect of personnel policy and practice in the employment, development, advancement, and treatment of civilian employees of the federal government, to the extent permitted by law.

Executive Order 13152 states that "status as a parent" refers to the status of an inpidual who, with respect to an inpidual who is under the age of 18 or who is 18 or older but is incapable of self-care because of a physical or mental disability, is: a biological parent, an adoptive parent, a foster parent, a stepparent, a custodian of a legal ward, in loco parentis over such inpidual, or actively seeking legal custody or adoption of such an inpidual. The Executive Order authorized OPM to develop guidance on the provisions of the Order.

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SEWARD NEBRASKA tspan:3m SEWARD NEBRASKA




The situation of health coverage in in SEWARD NEBRASKA

1. After five years of the Affordable Care Act, more than 16 million people have health coverage.

That's more people than the populations of New York City, Los Angeles, and Chicago combined. This number includes parents who can finally afford to take their kids to the doctor, families who no longer risk losing their homes or savings because someone becomes ill, and young people who are now free to pursue their dreams without worrying about losing access to health care. 

With millions of people getting covered, the uninsured rate for non-elderly adults has dropped by 35% since October 2013. “The Affordable Care Act is working,” President Obama said after hearing the news that millions of Americans had signed up and gotten covered. “And I'll tell you, everywhere I go around the country, I'm meeting inpiduals who come up and thank me. How passionate they are about the difference it's made in their lives, it really reminds me why we do all of this." 


2. Medicaid is helping millions.

The Affordable Care Act allows states to expand eligibility for Medicaid, and 28 states and the District of Columbia have done so. Across all 50 states, there are 11.2 million additional Americans enrolled in Medicaid compared to a baseline period in the fall of 2013.

While not every state expanded Medicaid, those that did are seeing especially strong coverage gains. In Medicaid expansion states, the uninsured rate among families with incomes below 138 percent of the federal poverty line declined by 13 percentage points, nearly double the decline in non-expansion states.


3. Those with pre-existing conditions can no longer be denied health insurance.

Prior to the Affordable Care Act, health insurance companies could deny you coverage or charge you more because of a health problem that you had prior to applying for insurance. Thanks to the Affordable Care Act, health insurance companies can’t refuse to cover you just because you have a pre-existing condition and they can’t close you out of coverage by charging you more than someone who doesn’t have a pre-existing condition.

This key provision means that up to 129 million Americans with pre-existing conditions are no longer at risk of being denied coverage. This includes the parents of over 17.6 million children with pre-existing conditions who no longer have to live with that worry. 


4. The uninsured rate for young Americans is at its lowest point since at least 1997.

Thanks to the Affordable Care Act, the uninsured rate for young Americans has declined by more than 40 percent over the past five years. Since 2010, more than 5 million young adults have gained coverage.  This includes 2.3 million young adults who have gained coverage by being able to stay on their parent's health plan. Under the Affordable Care Act, young adults can stay on their parent’s coverage until age 26. With all that can happens in a young person's life, this provision helps ensure that those who are just starting out in college and work careers can plan with the assurance that they have access to quality and affordable coverage. 


5. Americans no longer have lifetime and annual limits on their coverage.

The Affordable Care Act has lifted the lifetime health benefit caps for 105 million Americans. Previously, many plans set a lifetime limit on how much they would spend for your covered benefits during the entire time you were enrolled in their plan. If you went over, you’d be paying out of pocket. Annual limits also constrained families and inpiduals by restricting how much they could receive per year. That's not how it should be. That’s why the Affordable Care Act prohibits health plans from putting annual or lifetime dollar limits on most benefits. 


These are just five of the core ways in which the Affordable Care Act has helped Americans get quality, affordable health care. See for yourself: Click here to meet inpiduals who have benefited from health care, read their stories, and then pass them on so others can see what getting covered -- and staying covered -- means. 

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Victms of discrimination in SEWARD NEBRASKA

The EEOC enforces the prohibitions against employment discrimination in Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Equal Pay Act of 1963, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967, Sections 501 and 505 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Titles I and V of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), Title II of the Genetic Information Non-discrimination Act (GINA), and the Civil Rights Act of 1991. These laws prohibit discrimination based on race, color, sex, religion, national origin, age, disability, and genetic information, as well as reprisal for protected activity. The Commission´s interpretations of these statutes apply to its adjudication and enforcement in federal sector as well as private sector and state and local government employment.

The EEOC has held that discrimination against an inpidual because that person is transgender (also known as gender identity discrimination) is discrimination because of sex and therefore is covered under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. See Macy v. Department of Justice, EEOC Appeal No. 0120120821 (April 20, 2012), http://www.eeoc.gov/decisions/0120120821%20Macy%20v%20DOJ%20ATF.txt. The Commission has also found that claims by lesbian, gay, and bisexual inpiduals alleging sex-stereotyping state a sex discrimination claim under Title VII. See Veretto v. U.S. Postal Service, EEOC Appeal No. 0120110873 (July 1, 2011), http://www.eeoc.gov/decisions/0120110873.txt; Castello v. U.S. Postal Service, EEOC Request No. 0520110649 (Dec. 20, 2011), http://www.eeoc.gov/decisions/0520110649.txt.

While discrimination based on an inpidual´s status as a parent (prohibited under Executive Order 13152) is not a covered basis under the laws enforced by the EEOC, there are circumstances where discrimination against caregivers may give rise to sex discrimination under Title VII or disability discrimination under the ADA. See Enforcement Guidance: Unlawful Disparate Treatment of Workers with Caregiving Responsibilities, www.eeoc.gov/policy/docs/caregiving.html.

Federal government employees may file claims of discrimination under the Part 1614 EEO process on any of the bases covered under the laws EEOC enforces, and/or may also utilize additional complaint procedures described below.

Civil Service Reform Act

The Civil Service Reform Act of 1978 (CSRA), as amended, also protects federal government applicants and employees from discrimination in personnel actions (see "Prohibited Personnel Practices" http://www.opm.gov/ovrsight/proidx.asp) based on race, color, sex, religion, national origin, age, disability, marital status, political affiliation, or on conduct which does not adversely affect the performance of the applicant or employee -- which can include sexual orientation or transgender (gender identity) status. The Office of Special Counsel (OSC), www.osc.gov, and the Merit Systems Protection Board (MSPB), www.mspb.gov, enforce the prohibitions against federal employment discrimination codified in the CSRA. For more information, see OPM´s Addressing Sexual Orientation Discrimination in Federal Civilian Employment at www.opm.gov/er/address2/guide01.htm, OPM´s Guidance Regarding the Employment of Transgender Inpiduals in the Federal Workplace at www.opm.gov/persity/Transgender/Guidance.asp, and OSC´s Prohibited Personnel Practices and How to File a Complaint at http://www.osc.gov/ppp.htm.

Executive Orders

Additionally, federal agencies retain procedures for making complaints of discrimination on any bases prohibited by Executive Orders reviewed below. For example, some lesbian, gay, and bisexual employees may file complaints under both the agency´s Executive Order complaint process (for sexual orientation discrimination) and 1614 process (for sex discrimination), as these are separate processes.

Executive Order 11478, section 1 (as amended by Executive Orders 13087 and 13152) provides:

It is the policy of the government of the United States to provide equal opportunity in federal employment for all persons, to prohibit discrimination in employment because of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, handicap, age, sexual orientation or status as a parent, and to promote the full realization of equal employment opportunity through a continuing affirmative program in each executive department and agency. This policy of equal opportunity applies to and must be an integral part of every aspect of personnel policy and practice in the employment, development, advancement, and treatment of civilian employees of the federal government, to the extent permitted by law.

Executive Order 13152 states that "status as a parent" refers to the status of an inpidual who, with respect to an inpidual who is under the age of 18 or who is 18 or older but is incapable of self-care because of a physical or mental disability, is: a biological parent, an adoptive parent, a foster parent, a stepparent, a custodian of a legal ward, in loco parentis over such inpidual, or actively seeking legal custody or adoption of such an inpidual. The Executive Order authorized OPM to develop guidance on the provisions of the Order.

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Newsof.org. Selected the top stories of the city of SEWARD NEBRASKA. Political events, traffic accidents on highways, downtown events, neighborhoods and inside. Also researched local newspapers and social networks, as well as the site of City Hall. Crimes, are always subject to demand generally for information. Also the tragedies and disasters such as fires, floods, flooding, rain, hail and winds. Tags: Breaking News, SEWARD NEBRASKA, City, Indoors, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday , Friday, Saturday, Sunday, Car, Crash, Elections, Beating, Accident, Crime, Police, Criminal, Police, Road, Highway Access, Elections, Party, Hail, Rain, Flood, Anniversary, Award, Month, Week End , Today, Yesterday, Female, Male, Family, Child, People.