SMYRNA TENNESSEE NEWS AND BLOG


Latest News - SMYRNA TENNESSEE

TN National Guard soldiers make it home for the holidays


Family and friends gathered in Smyrna, Tenn. to welcome the soldiers back home. Rachal Bean and her two sons, Daniel and Andrew, have been waiting for several months to see their soldier, Staff Sgt. Daniel Bean. PREVIOUS: TN National Guard troops returning ...

Tennessee soldiers return home from Afghanistan


SMYRNA (WATE) – More than 40 soldiers returned home this morning from a 10 month tour in Afghanistan. They are from the Tennessee National Guards 1/230th Air Cavalry Squadron. Family members were very happy and excited to welcome home the soldiers just ...

Reward Offered For Information About Smyrna Murder


(Smyrna, TN) -- A six-thousand-dollar reward is being offered for information about the murder of a Smyrna man. Investigators say Danny Wright was working on a car in the front yard of his home on August 7th when he was shot. The gunman was described by ...

Investigators offering reward for answers in Smyrna murder - WSMV Channel 4


Danny Wright, 46, was shot and killed on Aug. 7 as he worked on a car in the yard of a Smyrna home. "Why would they have done that to him?" asked Jackie Williams, Wright's daughter. "Because there was like three other people standing outside and they only ...

Brown, David Lynn


BLUE MOUND -- David Lynn Brown, formerly of Blue Mound, IL, passed away at his home in Smyrna, Tennessee, at the age of 69. David was born January 2, 1945 in Macon County, Decatur, Illinois, the son of the late Harold Marshall and Mildred June Brown.

Keri Leigh Victory


Keri Leigh Victory, age 30, of Smyrna, TN went to be with the Lord on Tuesday, December 9, 2014. A native of White Bluff, TN she was preceded in death by her grandfather, Lawrence England and grandmother, Suzanne Gonzales. A memorial service will be held ...

Board of Regents, Nissan break ground for $35M training center at Smyrna


SMYRNA, Tennessee — The Tennessee Board of Regents and Nissan have broken ground for a new $35 million training center in Smyrna. The board is building the 150,000-square-foot-plus center near Nissan's Smyrna Vehicle plant. The facility will operate as ...

Tennessee’s Newest Public College Will Double As A Training Center For Nissan


The Tennessee Board of Regents broke ground today on a new facility across the street from Nissan’s factory in Smyrna. The $35 million building will serve as an extension of the Tennessee College of Applied Technology at Murfreesboro, as well as a ...

Nissan, TCAT To Build New $35 Million Training Facility In Smyrna


SMYRNA, Tenn. - Nissan is venturing into education, hoping to accelerate the production of a skilled workforce. The vehicle manufacturer announced plans to partner with the Tennessee College of Applied Technology to build a new training facility.

Smyrna Tennessee Police Standoff


A man has barricaded himself into a Smyrna, Tennessee home, creating a standoff with local police after shooting one person. Reports say that the victim is injured, but no details about how seriously injured they are have been revealed. A SWAT team has ...



SPECIAL INFORMATION FOR SMYRNA

This is Real: The World Climate is Changing

Our Earth is warming. The average temperature of the Earth has risen about 1.4 ° F (0.7 ° C over) over the last century. It is projected that the average temperature rise of approximately 2 to 11.5 ° F (1.1 ° C to 6.4 ° C) over the next hundred years. Small changes in average global temperature could lead to large and potentially dangerous changes in climate and weather.

The evidence is clear. Rising temperatures have been accompanied by changes in the weather and climate. Many sites have seen changes in rainfall, which resulted in more flooding, drought or heavy rain and waves more frequent and severe heat.The oceans and glaciers on the planet have also undergone some big changes: the oceans are warming and acidifying, the ice caps are melting and sea levels are rising. As these and other changes are more pronounced in the coming decades, they will have to present challenges to our society and our environment.

Learn about the signs of climate change in the United States.


Humans are largely responsible for recent climate change

smoke coming from a chimney in a factory

Over the past century, human activity has downloaded large amounts of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. Most greenhouse gases come from the burning of fossil fuels that produce energy, but deforestation, industrial processes and some agricultural practices also emit gases into the atmosphere.

The greenhouse gases act like a blanket around the Earth, which traps energy in the atmosphere and causes it to heat.This phenomenon is called the greenhouse effect is natural and necessary to sustain life on Earth. However, the accumulation of greenhouse gases can change the Earth´s climate and dangerous effects to human health and welfare and ecosystems.

The choices we make today will affect the amount of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will in the near future and for years to come.

Learn about the causes of climate change .


Climate change affects all

Our lives are linked to climate. Human societies have adapted to relatively stable climate which have enjoyed since the last Ice Age ended several millennia ago. A warming climate will result in process changes that could affect our water supplies, agriculture, energy and transport systems, the natural environment and to our own health and safety.

Some of the climate changes are inevitable. carbon dioxide can remain in the atmosphere for about a century so the Earth will continue to warm over the coming decades. The hotter it gets, the greater the risk of more severe changes in climate and Earth system. Although it is difficult to predict the exact impacts of climate change, it is clear that the climate to which we are accustomed to is no longer a guide to which we can trust what we can expect in the future.

We can reduce the risks we face from climate change. Choosing options that reduce pollution from greenhouse gases and prepare for the changes that are already underway, we can reduce the risks of climate change. Our decisions will shape the world in which our children and grandchildren will live.

Learn about the impacts of climate change and adaptation to change .


We can make a difference

hands holding a globe

You can take action. You can take steps at home, on the road, in your office to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases and the risks associated with climate change. Many of these steps can save you money; some, such as walking or cycling to work could improve your health! You may also participate in activities to support local or state level energy efficiency, clean energy programs and other climate programs.

Learn about what you can do .

Calculate your carbon footprint and find ways to reduce their emissions through simple actions you take daily.

EPA and other federal agencies are taking action. EPA is working to protect the health and welfare of the people in this country through common sense measures to reduce pollution and greenhouse gases to help communities prepare for change climate.

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To protect students at career colleges from becoming burdened by student loan debt they cannot repay !

 These regulations will hold career training programs accountable for putting their students on the path to success, and they complement action across the Administration to protect consumers and prevent and investigate fraud, waste and abuse, particularly at for-profit colleges.

"Career colleges must be a stepping stone to the middle class. But too many hard-working students find themselves buried in debt with little to show for it. That is simply unacceptable," U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said. "These regulations are a necessary step to ensure that colleges accepting federal funds protect students, cut costs and improve outcomes. We will continue to take action as needed."

To qualify for federal student aid, the law requires that most for-profit programs and certificate programs at private non-profit and public institutions prepare students for "gainful employment in a recognized occupation." Under the regulations finalized today, a program would be considered to lead to gainful employment if the estimated annual loan payment of a typical graduate does not exceed 20 percent of his or her discretionary income or 8 percent of his or her total earnings. Programs that exceed these levels would be at risk of losing their ability to participate in taxpayer-funded federal student aid programs.

The final gainful employment regulations follow an extensive rulemaking process involving public hearings, negotiations and about 95,000 public comments. The regulations, which will go into effect on July 1, 2015, reflect the feedback the Department received, and aim to protect Americans from poor career training programs by targeting those programs that leave students buried in debt with few opportunities to repay it. Highlights of the rule include:

  • Preventing students from being buried in debt: Based on available data, the Department estimates that about 1,400 programs serving 840,000 students—of whom 99 percent are at for-profit institutions—would not pass the accountability standards. All programs will have the opportunity to make immediate changes that could help them avoid sanctions, but if these programs do not improve, they will ultimately become ineligible for federal student aid—which often makes up nearly 90 percent of the revenue at for-profit institutions.
  • More rigorous accountability than previous regulations: The new regulations are tougher than the Department's 2011 rules because they set a higher passing requirement and lay out a shorter path to ineligibility for the poorest-performing programs. In 2012, the Department estimated that 193 programs would not have passed the previous regulations; with respect to these new regulations, based on available data, the Department estimates that about 1,400 programs would not pass the accountability metric.
  • Providing transparency about student success: The rule also provides useful information for all students and consumers by requiring institutions to provide important information about their programs, like what their former students are earning, their success at graduating, and the amount of debt they accumulated.
  • Improving student outcomes: The regulations build on momentum toward increased accountability in higher education by setting standards for career training programs, including programs offered by for-profit institutions, to ensure they are serving students well. While the Department has seen encouraging changes in the past five years, it believes all career training programs can and should meet higher expectations.

Today, the Department is also taking new steps to formalize partnerships with several federal agencies to enhance cooperation and ensure proper oversight of for-profit institutions of higher education through an interagency task force.

Background on the Administration's efforts to protect students from poor-performing career colleges Too often, students at career colleges—including thousands of veterans—are charged excessive costs, but don't get the education they paid for. Instead, students in such programs are provided with poor quality training, often for low-wage jobs or in occupations where there are simply no job opportunities. They find themselves with large amounts of debt and, too often, end up in default. In many cases, students are drawn into these programs with confusing or misleading information.

The situation for students at for-profit institutions is particularly troubling. On average, attending a two-year for-profit institution costs a student four times as much as attending a community college. More than 80 percent of students at for-profits borrow, while less than half of students at public institutions do. Ultimately, students at for-profit colleges represent only about 11 percent of the total higher education population but 44 percent of all federal student loan defaults.

In response to these concerns, in 2009, the Department began extensive conversations with the higher education community about the role of career colleges, particularly on how they could be held accountable for the outcomes of their students. Following a 2012 court decision, which affirmed the U.S. Department of Education's authority to regulate in this area in order to protect students and taxpayers, the Department undertook new efforts to make sure career training programs provide affordable pathways to good jobs.

The Department believes many institutions have already started to take steps to improve. Some of the largest institutions have instituted trial periods for programs before students have to commit, so students can decide if that program is right for them. There are reports that institutions have decreased program lengths. Some are reducing costs. And a few institutions have closed some locations and programs they judge to be performing poorly.

But the Department also believes there is still potential for improvement in many of these programs—public, private non-profit and for-profit—so it is taking action to spur more change.

The gainful employment regulations are a central part of the Administration's work to ensure that student debt is affordable and that for-profit colleges serve students well. These regulations complement other efforts taken by the Administration to protect students by addressing problems at poor performing institutions, particularly in the for-profit sector. These efforts include:

  • Formalizing an interagency oversight task force The Department will lead an effort to formalize an interagency task force to help ensure proper oversight of for-profit institutions of higher education. In particular, the Department and other federal and state agencies will coordinate their activities and promote information sharing to protect students from unfair, deceptive, and abusive policies and practices. The task force will build on efforts already underway among various federal agencies, and include the Departments of Justice, Treasury and Veterans Affairs, as well as the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, Federal Trade Commission, and the Securities and Exchange Commission. In addition, state attorneys general will also be invited to continue their participation in this collaboration. Given the important responsibilities each of these federal agencies has, and the vital role that states play, the agencies will leverage their resources and expertise to assist one another, thereby making the best use of scarce resources and better protecting the interests of students and taxpayers. This task force will formalize and strengthen a working group that has been working together over the past year and that has coordinated efforts in several reviews and investigatory work. The task force will meet as needed, but at least once each quarter.

  • Keeping student debt affordable The Department is helping more students manage their student debt through flexible repayment options like the Pay As You Earn plan, which caps student loan payments at 10 percent of a borrower's discretionary income. In addition, the Administration continues targeted outreach to help borrowers who may be struggling to repay their loans, ensuring that they have the information they need to select the best repayment option for them and avoid future default.

  • Developing a college ratings system The Department is also working on a new college ratings system, which will showcase colleges and universities that are effective in improving student success; incentivize institutions to work toward the most important goals, like graduating low-income students and holding down costs; and help students and families choose their school based on the value it provides for their investment.

  • Strengthening oversight of the programs on which our nation's service members and veterans rely Through Executive Order 13607, the Principles of Excellence for Educational Institutions Serving Service Members, Veterans, Spouses, and Other Family Members, the Administration has worked to protect our nation's military families by ensuring that federal military and veterans educational benefits programs are providing service members, veterans, spouses, and other family members with the information, support, and protections they deserve. This includes: establishing a centralized complaint system; new, risk-based program reviews informed by students complaints to focus enforcement efforts at the Departments of Veterans Affairs, Defense, Education and Justice, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, and the Federal Trade Commission; and key tools and resources like the online GI Bill ® Comparison Tool, which has made it easier for over 450,000 veterans, service members and their dependents to select education and training programs that provide a good value and meet their needs.




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