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Latest News - SPOKANE WASHINGTON

Sweet 16 has sweet impact in Spokane


SPOKANE, Wash. - Crime Stoppers has released a new batch of ...
adding two this year in upsets over No. 6 George Washington and No. 3 seeded Oregon State in Corvallis, Ore. last weekend.>> The Gonzaga women have made NCAA Tournament history with eight ...

Mid-Columbia Mastersingers, Spokane Choral Artists aim to inspire through collaboration


But Mid-Columbia Mastersingers and Spokane Choral Artists have forged a strong connection ...
a choral group made up of music directors and educators from Washington, Oregon and Idaho. Eventually, “we said, ‘Why don’t we try something together?”

Lady Vols focusing on defensive principles heading into matchup with Gonzaga


SPOKANE, Wash. — Along with racking up the miles to continue ...
in tournament victories over George Washington and Oregon State. The Bulldogs' versatility is reflected by the fact that eight different players have led them in scoring this season.

Washington Awards 2015 LIHTCs


Father Bach Haven II in Spokane by Catholic Housing Services of Eastern Washington ($8.5 million estimated LIHTC equity) and VOA 2 nd Avenue in Spokane by Volunteers of America of Eastern Washington and Northern Idaho ($8.1 million estimated LIHTC equity ...

Longtime Alaska Jesuit priest dies in Spokane at age 88


FAIRBANKS, Alaska — Louis Renner, a Jesuit priest who taught for decades in Alaska’s interior and wrote about the faith’s history in the state, has died in Spokane, Washington, at age 88. Renner died Tuesday morning at the Gonzaga University ...

State grants Spokane seat at oil train hearings


With a significant boost in oil trains rolling through downtown possible, city leaders say Spokane’s “voice will be heard” as the state considers a proposed crude oil terminal in Vancouver, Washington. The state’s Energy Facility Site Evaluation ...

Washington fire chiefs to railroad company: We want more info on oil trains


...
competing bills meant to address the safety concerns presented by the influx of oil trains passing through Washington in recent years. Spokane, which is the only urban center these trains pass through on their way to western Washington, faces ...

Sperry Van Ness International Corporation Adds a Commercial Real Estate Franchise in Spokane, Washington


Sperry Van Ness International Corporation announces its newest franchise in Spokane, Washington–Sperry Van Ness®/Cornerstone. SVN/Cornerstone will focus on providing full-service brokerage and expert property management services throughout Eastern ...

Spokane taxpayers save on WSDOT road repair program


SPOKANE, Wash. - The Washington State Department of Transportation set up a pilot program a few years ago to try and save taxpayers some money on road repairs, and now they say the program is saving thousands each year. Crews tackle minor problems right ...

Lady Vols find 'Bigfoot', continue prep for Gonzaga


Tennessee will get a chance to practice in Spokane Arena on Friday for 90 minutes. Tennessee is the 2-seed in the Spokane Region and will take on the 11-seed in Gonzaga around 6:30 p.m. ET on Saturday.

Talent on display in Spokane regional - Thu, 26 Mar 2015 PST


No player in the Spokane regional has a better résumé than Duke’s Elizabeth Williams, a three-time All-America selection who could be a top pick in next month’s WNBA draft. Or she could go to medical…

WSU medical school in Spokane gets Senate OK - Thu, 26 Mar 2015 PST


OLYMPIA – Washington State University should soon have the authority to start a new medical school on its Spokane campus. The question now is, will it have the money to do that? On Wednesday, the Sena…

How To Purchase Online Prostate Enlargement Homeopathic Medicine In Spokane, Washington


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Cure Churg Strauss Syndrome Food Supplements Holland Barrett In Spokane, Washington


Natural cure obstructive sleep apnea cure churg strauss syndrome homeopathic treatment dairy cows. Herbal Zinc for male infertility in Spokane, Washington. This happens your diet increase more Hgh. Al…

Best Steroid Get Cut Piper Nigrum Chemistry Piperine In Spokane, Washington


Alternative medicine enlarged liver best steroid get cut best tribulus terrestris women. Homeopathic friendly Lactuca virosa for menstrual pain in Spokane, Washington. Many humans say how much Hgh is …

Quelling vaccine fear in Spokane’s Russian-speaking community - Tue, 24 Mar 2015 PST


Earlier this month about 20 people from Spokane’s Russian-speaking community gathered to talk – in Russian – about the fear and reluctance to vaccinate their children for diseases such as hepatitis B,…

GU women seek Sweet 16 in Spokane - Sat, 21 Mar 2015 PST


With one upset in the books, the Gonzaga women’s basketball team seeks another today on the home court of the Pac-12 champions for the chance to play in Spokane in the Sweet 16.

Medicines For Weight Loss Ayurvedic Medicines For Bladder Weakness In Spokane, Washington


Natural herbal remedies for insomnia medicines for weight loss ayurvedic. How to buy safe Goji berries for bone and joint conditions in Spokane, Washington? In their plenitude to the medicines for wei…

Importance Of Professional House Cleaning Services In Spokane, WA


Professional House cleaning services Spokane, WA is quite important for all those who have a busy lifestyle. If the home chores are piling up on you, it might be the right time to consider hiring prof…

Eastern alumnus finds niche in Spokane’s poetry scene


When his name is announced, the crowd erupts into cheers and applause. Some 50 people were crammed into downtown Spokane’s tiny Neato Burrito for its weekly Broken Mic poetry readings, at which Travis…




SPECIAL INFORMATION FOR SPOKANE

Make Your Health Benefits Work for You in SPOKANE WASHINGTON

The Department of Labor´s Employee Benefits Security Administration (EBSA) administers several important health benefit laws covering employer-based health plans. They govern your basic rights to information about how your health plan works, how to qualify for benefits, and how to make claims for benefits.

In addition, there are specific laws protecting your right to health benefits when you lose coverage or change jobs. EBSA also oversees health care laws covering special medical conditions. For more information on the laws that protect your benefits, see EBSA´s Website. Or call the agency toll free at 1-866-444-3272 to reach a regional office near you. These 10 tips can help make your health benefits work better for you.

1. Explore Your Options for Health Coverage

You have options for health coverage. There are many different types of health benefit plans. Find out what your employer offers, then check out the plan (or plans). Your employer´s human resource office, the health plan administrator, or your union can provide information to help you match your needs and preferences with the available plans. Or consider a health plan through the Health Insurance Marketplace. Visit HealthCare.gov to see the health plan options available in your area. Get information about all of your options and review it. The more information you have, the better your health care decisions will be.

2. Review the Benefits Available

Do the plans offered cover the benefits that are important to you, such as mental health services, well-baby care, vision or dental care? Are there deductibles? What are the out-of-pocket expenses you may face? Determine your needs and priorities. Compare all of your options before you decide which coverage to elect. Matching your needs and those of your family members will result in the best possible benefits. Cheapest may not always be best. Your goal is high quality health benefits.

3. Read Your Plan´s Summary Plan Description (SPD) for the Wealth of Information It Provides

Your health plan administrator should provide a copy. It outlines your benefits and your legal rights under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA), the Federal law that protects your health benefits. It also should contain information about the coverage of dependents, what services will require a co-payment or coinsurance, and the circumstances under which your employer can change or terminate a health benefits plan. You also can find many of the answers to your questions in the Summary of Benefits and Coverage (SBC), a short, easy-to-understand summary of what a plan covers and what it costs. You should receive a copy with your enrollment materials. Save the SPD, the SBC, and all other health plan brochures and documents, along with memos or correspondence from your employer relating to health benefits.

4. Use Your Health Coverage

Once your health coverage has started, use it to help cover medical costs for services like going to the doctor, filling prescriptions or getting emergency care. Using your benefits will help you and your family stay healthy and reduce your health care costs. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) provides many valuable protections for people enrolled in employment-based health plans including prohibiting preexisting condition exclusions and annual and lifetime limits on essential health benefits. What’s more, many plans cover certain preventive services for free, including routine vaccinations, regular well-baby and well-child visits, blood pressure, diabetes and cholesterol tests, and many cancer screenings. You also can keep your children on your health plan until age 26. Take advantage of your benefits, especially free preventive care if your plan covers it. If you were required to pay cost-sharing for a preventive service, check your Explanation of Benefits and ensure that the provider billed the service properly.

5. Understand Your Plan’s Mental Health and Substance Use Coverage

Many health plans provide coverage for mental health and substance use disorder benefits. If a plan does offer these benefits, the financial requirements (such as co-payments and deductibles) and the quantitative treatment limits (such as visit limits) for the mental health and substance use disorder benefits cannot be more restrictive than the financial requirements or treatment limits applied to medical/surgical benefits. Plans also cannot impose lifetime and annual limits on the dollar amount of mental health and substance use disorder services, including behavioral health treatment. Some plans cover preventive services like screenings for depression and child behavioral assessments for free. Check your SPD and SBC to find out what your plan covers.

6. Look For Wellness Programs

More employers are establishing wellness programs that encourage employees to work out, stop smoking, and generally adopt healthier lifestyles. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and the ACA encourage group health plans to adopt wellness programs but also includes protections for employees and dependents from impermissible discrimination based on a health factor. These programs often provide rewards such as cost savings as well as promoting good health. Check your SPD and SBC to see whether your plan offers a wellness program(s). If your plan does, find out what reward is offered and what you need to do to receive it.

7. Know How to File an Appeal if Your Health Benefits Claim is Denied

Understand your plan’s procedures for filing a claim for benefits and where to make appeals of the plan´s decisions. Pay attention to time limits – make sure you timely file claims and appeals and that the plan makes decisions on time. Keep records and copies of correspondence. Check your health benefits package and your SPD to determine who is responsible for handling problems with benefit claims. Contact EBSA for assistance if you are unable to obtain a response to your complaint.

8. Assess Your Benefits Coverage as Your Family Status Changes

Marriage, Porce, childbirth or adoption, the death of a spouse, and aging out of a parent’s health plan are life events that may signal a need to change your health benefits. You, your spouse, and your dependent children may be eligible for special enrollment into other employer health coverage or through the Health Insurance Marketplace. Even without life-changing events, the information provided by your employer should tell you how you can change benefits or switch plans. If you’re considering special enrollment, act quickly. You have 30 days after the life event to request special enrollment in other employer coverage or 60 days to select a plan in the Marketplace.

9. Be Aware that Changing Jobs and Other Work Events Can Affect Your Health Benefits

If you change employers or lose your job, you may need to find other health coverage. If you have a new job, consider enrolling in your new employer’s plan. Whether starting or losing a job, you may be eligible to special enroll in a spouse’s employer-sponsored plan or through the Health Insurance Marketplace. Under the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act – better known as COBRA – you, your covered spouse, and your dependent children may be eligible to continue coverage under your former employer-sponsored plan. This coverage is temporary (generally 18 to 36 months) and you may have to pay the entire premium plus a 2 percent administrative charge. Get information on your coverage options and compare. Be aware of the deadlines for deciding on coverage and find out when your new coverage will be effective.

10. Plan For Retirement

Before you retire, find out what health benefits, if any, extend to you and your spouse during your retirement years. Consult with your employer´s human resources office, your union, or the plan administrator. Check your SPD and other plan documents. Make sure there is no conflicting information among these sources about the benefits you will receive or the circumstances under which they can change or be eliminated. With this information in hand, you can make other important choices, like finding out if you are eligible for Medicare and Medigap insurance coverage. If you want to retire before you are eligible for Medicare and your employer does not provide health benefits in retirement, consider what you will do for health coverage. Your options may include enrolling in a spouse’s employer plan or in a Marketplace plan or temporarily continuing your employer coverage by electing COBRA. Planning for retirement includes planning for your health coverage in retirement. To find out more, read Taking the Mystery Out of Retirement Planning.

These Laws Can Help

  • The Employee Retirement Income Security Act – Offers protection for inPiduals enrolled in retirement, health, and other benefit plans sponsored by private-sector employers, and provides rights to information and a claims and appeals process for participants to get benefits from their plans.
  • The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act – Creates the Health Insurance Marketplace and provides protections for employment-based health coverage, including extending dependent coverage of children to age 26; prohibiting preexisting condition exclusions and prohibiting lifetime and annual limits on essential health benefits.
  • The Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act – Contains provisions giving certain former employees, retirees, spouses, and dependent children the right to purchase temporary continuation of group health plan coverage at group rates in specific instances.
  • The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act – Allows employees, their spouses and their dependents to enroll in employer-provided health coverage regardless of open enrollment periods if they lose coverage or in the event of marriage, birth, adoption or placement for adoption. Also prohibits discrimination in health care coverage.
  • The Women´s Health and Cancer Rights Act – Offers protections for breast cancer patients who elect breast reconstruction in connection with a mastectomy.
  • The Newborns´ and Mothers´ Health Protection Act – Provides rules on minimum coverage for hospital lengths of stay following childbirth.
  • The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act – Prohibits discrimination in group health plan premiums based on genetic information. Also, generally prohibits group health plans from requesting genetic information or requiring genetic tests.
  • The Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act and the Mental Health Parity Act – Requires parity in financial requirements and treatment limitations for mental health and substance use benefits with those for medical and surgical benefits.
  • The Children´s Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act – Allows special enrollment in a group health plan if an employee or dependents lose coverage under CHIP or Medicaid or are eligible for premium assistance under those programs.

For More Information

Visit the Employee Benefits Security Administration’s Website to view the following publications. To order copies or to request assistance from a benefits advisor, contact EBSA electronically or call toll free 1-866-444-3272.

[4]

SPOKANE WASHINGTON tspan:3m SPOKANE WASHINGTON




There are more opportunities than ever for those receiving benefits from Social Security Disability Insurance [Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI)] and SSI [Supplemental Security Income (SSI)] to learn job skills and find permanent employment in SPOKANE WASHINGTON.

If you are looking for work, or are new to the workforce, familiarize yourself with the Americans with Disabilities Act [Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)] of 1990 , a federal civil rights law designed to prevent discrimination and enable people with disabilities to participate fully in all aspects of society.

A fundamental principle of the ADA is that people with disabilities who want to work and are qualified to do so should have equal employment opportunities.

This booklet answers questions you may have about your employment rights under the ADA.

How do I know if I am protected by the ADA?

To be protected, you must be a qualified individual with a disability. This means you must have a disability as defined by the ADA. Under the ADA, you have a disability if he has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits a major life activity such as hearing, seeing, speaking, thinking, walking, breathing, or performing manual tasks. You must also be able to perform the job for which you want to be hired, or for which you have been hired, with or without reasonable accommodation.

What are my rights under the ADA?

The ADA protects you from discrimination in all employment practices, including: job application procedures, hiring, firing, training, pay, promotions, benefits and licenses. You are also right not to be harassed because of your disability and your employer can not fire or discipline you for asserting your rights under the ADA. More importantly, you have the right to request reasonable for the hiring process and employment functional adaptations.

What is a "reasonable accommodation"?

A reasonable accommodation is any modification or adjustment to a job, work environment or how they usually do things that would allow you to apply for a job, work, or enjoy equal access to the benefits available to others in the workplace. There are many things that can help people with disabilities work successfully. Some of the most common types of accommodations are:

  • physical changes, such as installing a ramp or modifying the workspace or services;
  • sign language interpreters for the deaf or blind readers;
  • provide a quiet space or other changes to reduce noise distractions for someone with mental disabilities;
  • training and written materials in accessible formats such as Braille or audio cassette or computer discs;
  • TTY for deaf can use the telephone, and computer hardware and software to facilitate computer access for people with visual impairments or who have difficulty using their hands; and
  • licenses disability who needs treatment.

    What should I do if I think I need a reasonable accommodation?

    If you think you need a reasonable accommodation for the job application process or at work, you must apply. You may request a reasonable accommodation at any time during the job application, or any time before or after starting work. How do I request a reasonable accommodation? Just let your employer who needs an adjustment or change because of their disability. Needless to complete special forms or use technical language to do so. For example, if you use a wheelchair and it does not fit under your desk, you should talk to your supervisor. This is a request for a reasonable accommodation. A doctor´s note requesting disability leave or saying that you can work with certain restrictions is also a request for reasonable accommodation. What happens after making a request for a reasonable accommodation? Once you have made the request for reasonable accommodation, the employer must discuss the options available to you. If you have a disability that is not obvious, the employer may require documentation that demonstrates and explains why you need a reasonable accommodation. You and your employer must work together to determine an appropriate accommodation.

    For more information on labor support, contact the Social Security Administration [Social Security Administration] to:

    1-800-772-1213 (voice)

    1-800-325-0778 (TTY) www.ssa.gov/work [2]




  • Make Your Health Benefits Work for You in SPOKANE WASHINGTON

    The Department of Labor´s Employee Benefits Security Administration (EBSA) administers several important health benefit laws covering employer-based health plans. They govern your basic rights to information about how your health plan works, how to qualify for benefits, and how to make claims for benefits.

    In addition, there are specific laws protecting your right to health benefits when you lose coverage or change jobs. EBSA also oversees health care laws covering special medical conditions. For more information on the laws that protect your benefits, see EBSA´s Website. Or call the agency toll free at 1-866-444-3272 to reach a regional office near you. These 10 tips can help make your health benefits work better for you.

    1. Explore Your Options for Health Coverage

    You have options for health coverage. There are many different types of health benefit plans. Find out what your employer offers, then check out the plan (or plans). Your employer´s human resource office, the health plan administrator, or your union can provide information to help you match your needs and preferences with the available plans. Or consider a health plan through the Health Insurance Marketplace. Visit HealthCare.gov to see the health plan options available in your area. Get information about all of your options and review it. The more information you have, the better your health care decisions will be.

    2. Review the Benefits Available

    Do the plans offered cover the benefits that are important to you, such as mental health services, well-baby care, vision or dental care? Are there deductibles? What are the out-of-pocket expenses you may face? Determine your needs and priorities. Compare all of your options before you decide which coverage to elect. Matching your needs and those of your family members will result in the best possible benefits. Cheapest may not always be best. Your goal is high quality health benefits.

    3. Read Your Plan´s Summary Plan Description (SPD) for the Wealth of Information It Provides

    Your health plan administrator should provide a copy. It outlines your benefits and your legal rights under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA), the Federal law that protects your health benefits. It also should contain information about the coverage of dependents, what services will require a co-payment or coinsurance, and the circumstances under which your employer can change or terminate a health benefits plan. You also can find many of the answers to your questions in the Summary of Benefits and Coverage (SBC), a short, easy-to-understand summary of what a plan covers and what it costs. You should receive a copy with your enrollment materials. Save the SPD, the SBC, and all other health plan brochures and documents, along with memos or correspondence from your employer relating to health benefits.

    4. Use Your Health Coverage

    Once your health coverage has started, use it to help cover medical costs for services like going to the doctor, filling prescriptions or getting emergency care. Using your benefits will help you and your family stay healthy and reduce your health care costs. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) provides many valuable protections for people enrolled in employment-based health plans including prohibiting preexisting condition exclusions and annual and lifetime limits on essential health benefits. What’s more, many plans cover certain preventive services for free, including routine vaccinations, regular well-baby and well-child visits, blood pressure, diabetes and cholesterol tests, and many cancer screenings. You also can keep your children on your health plan until age 26. Take advantage of your benefits, especially free preventive care if your plan covers it. If you were required to pay cost-sharing for a preventive service, check your Explanation of Benefits and ensure that the provider billed the service properly.

    5. Understand Your Plan’s Mental Health and Substance Use Coverage

    Many health plans provide coverage for mental health and substance use disorder benefits. If a plan does offer these benefits, the financial requirements (such as co-payments and deductibles) and the quantitative treatment limits (such as visit limits) for the mental health and substance use disorder benefits cannot be more restrictive than the financial requirements or treatment limits applied to medical/surgical benefits. Plans also cannot impose lifetime and annual limits on the dollar amount of mental health and substance use disorder services, including behavioral health treatment. Some plans cover preventive services like screenings for depression and child behavioral assessments for free. Check your SPD and SBC to find out what your plan covers.

    6. Look For Wellness Programs

    More employers are establishing wellness programs that encourage employees to work out, stop smoking, and generally adopt healthier lifestyles. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and the ACA encourage group health plans to adopt wellness programs but also includes protections for employees and dependents from impermissible discrimination based on a health factor. These programs often provide rewards such as cost savings as well as promoting good health. Check your SPD and SBC to see whether your plan offers a wellness program(s). If your plan does, find out what reward is offered and what you need to do to receive it.

    7. Know How to File an Appeal if Your Health Benefits Claim is Denied

    Understand your plan’s procedures for filing a claim for benefits and where to make appeals of the plan´s decisions. Pay attention to time limits – make sure you timely file claims and appeals and that the plan makes decisions on time. Keep records and copies of correspondence. Check your health benefits package and your SPD to determine who is responsible for handling problems with benefit claims. Contact EBSA for assistance if you are unable to obtain a response to your complaint.

    8. Assess Your Benefits Coverage as Your Family Status Changes

    Marriage, Porce, childbirth or adoption, the death of a spouse, and aging out of a parent’s health plan are life events that may signal a need to change your health benefits. You, your spouse, and your dependent children may be eligible for special enrollment into other employer health coverage or through the Health Insurance Marketplace. Even without life-changing events, the information provided by your employer should tell you how you can change benefits or switch plans. If you’re considering special enrollment, act quickly. You have 30 days after the life event to request special enrollment in other employer coverage or 60 days to select a plan in the Marketplace.

    9. Be Aware that Changing Jobs and Other Work Events Can Affect Your Health Benefits

    If you change employers or lose your job, you may need to find other health coverage. If you have a new job, consider enrolling in your new employer’s plan. Whether starting or losing a job, you may be eligible to special enroll in a spouse’s employer-sponsored plan or through the Health Insurance Marketplace. Under the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act – better known as COBRA – you, your covered spouse, and your dependent children may be eligible to continue coverage under your former employer-sponsored plan. This coverage is temporary (generally 18 to 36 months) and you may have to pay the entire premium plus a 2 percent administrative charge. Get information on your coverage options and compare. Be aware of the deadlines for deciding on coverage and find out when your new coverage will be effective.

    10. Plan For Retirement

    Before you retire, find out what health benefits, if any, extend to you and your spouse during your retirement years. Consult with your employer´s human resources office, your union, or the plan administrator. Check your SPD and other plan documents. Make sure there is no conflicting information among these sources about the benefits you will receive or the circumstances under which they can change or be eliminated. With this information in hand, you can make other important choices, like finding out if you are eligible for Medicare and Medigap insurance coverage. If you want to retire before you are eligible for Medicare and your employer does not provide health benefits in retirement, consider what you will do for health coverage. Your options may include enrolling in a spouse’s employer plan or in a Marketplace plan or temporarily continuing your employer coverage by electing COBRA. Planning for retirement includes planning for your health coverage in retirement. To find out more, read Taking the Mystery Out of Retirement Planning.

    These Laws Can Help

    • The Employee Retirement Income Security Act – Offers protection for inPiduals enrolled in retirement, health, and other benefit plans sponsored by private-sector employers, and provides rights to information and a claims and appeals process for participants to get benefits from their plans.
    • The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act – Creates the Health Insurance Marketplace and provides protections for employment-based health coverage, including extending dependent coverage of children to age 26; prohibiting preexisting condition exclusions and prohibiting lifetime and annual limits on essential health benefits.
    • The Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act – Contains provisions giving certain former employees, retirees, spouses, and dependent children the right to purchase temporary continuation of group health plan coverage at group rates in specific instances.
    • The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act – Allows employees, their spouses and their dependents to enroll in employer-provided health coverage regardless of open enrollment periods if they lose coverage or in the event of marriage, birth, adoption or placement for adoption. Also prohibits discrimination in health care coverage.
    • The Women´s Health and Cancer Rights Act – Offers protections for breast cancer patients who elect breast reconstruction in connection with a mastectomy.
    • The Newborns´ and Mothers´ Health Protection Act – Provides rules on minimum coverage for hospital lengths of stay following childbirth.
    • The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act – Prohibits discrimination in group health plan premiums based on genetic information. Also, generally prohibits group health plans from requesting genetic information or requiring genetic tests.
    • The Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act and the Mental Health Parity Act – Requires parity in financial requirements and treatment limitations for mental health and substance use benefits with those for medical and surgical benefits.
    • The Children´s Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act – Allows special enrollment in a group health plan if an employee or dependents lose coverage under CHIP or Medicaid or are eligible for premium assistance under those programs.

    For More Information

    Visit the Employee Benefits Security Administration’s Website to view the following publications. To order copies or to request assistance from a benefits advisor, contact EBSA electronically or call toll free 1-866-444-3272.

    [4]








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