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Union Springs man killed in early morning single-car crash in Bullock County


UNION SPRINGS, Alabama -- A Union Springs man was killed in a single-car crash early Sunday morning in Bullock County, according to Alabama State Troopers. Anthony Quatez Williams, 27, was killed around 12:05 a.m. when the 2014 Toyota Camry he was driving ...

Man killed in Bullock County crash


UNION SPRINGS, Ala. (AP) - Authorities say a man died after the car he was riding in veered from the road and struck a tree in Bullock County. Alabama Department of Public Safety spokesman Steve Jarrett said in an emailed statement that 27-year-old Anthony ...

Man dies after car veers from road in Bullock County, strikes tree


UNION SPRINGS, Alabama — Authorities say a man died after the car he was riding in veered from the road and struck a tree in Bullock County. Alabama Department of Public Safety spokesman Steve Jarrett said in an emailed statement that 27-year-old Anthony ...

Jones, Jr.,, James F.


Flowers will be accepted or memorial contributions may be to the Union Springs Baptist Church Cemetery Fund, 1642 County Road 73, Newville, AL 36353. Frankie was a native of Newville and a 1984 Graduate of Headland High School. He formerly served in the ...

Alabama Credit Union to open Hoover branch in 2015


Alabama Credit Union plans to increase its presence in the Birmingham ...
The credit union entered the Birmingham market with a branch in Indian Springs Village three years ago and was able to expand in the area again in 2013 through its acquisition ...

Union Springs Police: Two Dead in Murder-Suicide


Two men are dead in what Union Springs police are calling a murder-suicide. According to police ...
Police aren't releasing any names right now. Stay with Alabama News Network for the very latest.

High Ridge Spirits, Alabama's first legal distillery


Union Springs, Ala., once the cotton capital of the state, is now the home of the first legal distillery in Alabama since the prohibition era. High Ridge Spirits is located in the only city in Bullock County, Union Springs, which has a population of 3,290 ...



SPECIAL INFORMATION FOR UNION SPRINGS

4 Ways how young people can get health insurance

Young adults have several options to get coverage through the insurance market.

1. Special Enrollment Periods

Find out if you are eligible for a Special Enrollment Period. You may be eligible for registration under the Special Enrollment Period unknowingly. If your student medical coverage you finished, you may be eligible for a Special Enrollment Period that will allow you to purchase a health plan through the Insurance Market. You might also grant a Special Enrollment Period if you get married or divorced, have a child or adopt a child, moving to another area, and not old enough to be on the safe parent or have in your life some other event eligible to do so.

2. Medicaid and CHIP

Find out how to request coverage for Medicaid and CHIP . You can enroll in Medicaid or the Childrens Health Insurance Program (CHIP) at any time of year. If you qualify you can now register.

3. coverage through the health plan of the parent

You can get coverage from their parents plan until age 26, even if married, not living with their parents or dependent on them economically. After age 26, you qualify for a Special Enrollment Period.

4. Catastrophic Coverage

These plans are an affordable way to protect yourself from the high costs of the worst cases, such as an accident or serious illness. If you are under 30, you can purchase a catastrophic plan coverage. Served three visits per year before you have paid the deductible and certain preventive services .

Pay attention to your lifestyle in times of stress, advises a researcher

 

 Exercise, a healthy diet and a good sleep can protect the body from the negative effects of stress and slow down the process of aging at the cellular level, some researchers report.

A study with hundreds of older women found that stressful events are linked to increased shrinkage of Telomeres, the protective caps at the ends of chromosomes that affect the speed with which age the cells.

"We found that in a period of one year, while more stressful factors showed a woman, most likely it was their Telomeres are encogieran," said the author of the study, Eli Puterman, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at the Faculty of Medicine of the University of California in San Francisco.

But women who maintained an active life style, ate and slept well seemed protected from the effects of stress, and their Telomeres did not show a significant additional shrink, the researchers said.

Dr. Michael Speicher, Professor and Chair of the Institute of genetics, human at the Medical University of Graz, in Austria, said that the study "addresses a really important biological question: the reason that a healthy lifestyle of truth is useful, especially if one is exposed to stressors".

"The encouraging message is that if one carries out these healthy behaviors, you can reduce some of the effects of stress on the body," he said.

Telomeres are like the plastic end tips at the ends of the shoelace, which avoid you to discard.

They are composed of DNA and protein, and protect the ends of chromosomes so that you discard. As the Telomeres are shortened and their structural integrity is weakened, the cells age and die more quickly.

This type of cell aging has partnered with diseases related to age, cardiovascular disease, Alzheimers disease and cancer. A theory holds that older people are more likely to get cancer because its shrunken Telomeres have made that their chromosomes are unstable and that they tend to operate poorly, said Speicher, it did not participate in the study.

The Telomeres become shorter naturally with age, but unhealthy behaviors such as smoking, poor diet and lack of sleep can do that they shorten before, warned Puterman. Chronic emotional stress has also been linked with a few shorter Telomeres.

To see if a healthy lifestyle could combat the effects of stress, the researchers tracked 239 postmenopausal women who do not smoked for a year. The findings appear in the edition of July 29, the journal Molecular Psychiatry.

The women provided blood samples at the beginning and at the end of the year to measure the Telomere. They were subjected to periodic reviews of their physical activity, diet, and sleep.

In the end, the women also reported stressful events that had occurred in that year. Researchers focused on really stressful life events, become a caregiver of a relative sick, losing a house or a job, or that a loved one died, said Puterman.

The researchers found that those major stressful events elicited a more significant decline in the length of the Telomeres in women who were healthy behaviors without too much evidence.

But the same levels of stress not elicited a greater shortening of Telomeres in women who remained active, eat a healthy diet and slept well.

The study shows the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle in the difficult life periods, they said Puterman and Speicher.

"If were in stressful situations, physical activity, sleep and nutrition of truth are really important to keep our bodies in shape and stay healthy", said Speicher. "With this study now we see it at the genetic level."

The study also expands our understanding of how a healthy lifestyle affects the aging process, said Puterman.

"The same type of person who eats well and continues to exercise is the same type of person who does not age much," he said. "As we delve ever deeper into the cell, get more information above why and what happens at the genetic level".

But the study actually does not prove a causal relationship between healthy habits and a few longer Telomeres. The next step will be randomised trials to see if the exercise can be used to slow down Cellular Aging in people who face a continuous life stress, such as caregivers of Alzheimers patients.

"We will see if we can change the aging process within cells, as well as the levels of depression and stress and that sort of thing," said Puterman.

Although the study was limited to women, both experts said it makes sense that the findings apply to men.

Speicher went further. "There are several studies that say that on average, men have about womens shorter Telomeres," he said. "It could assumed that the effects on men would be even greater on women, but that is just a theory".

More information

For more information about Telomeres, visit the University of Utah.


Article by HealthDay



Why my child need the HPV vaccine?

This vaccine protects against most of the cancers caused by the virus infection of human papillomavirus (HPV). HPV is a common virus that spreads among people when they have sexual contact with another person. Each year, around 14 million people, including teenagers, are infected with HPV. HPV infection can cause cancer of the cervix in women and cancer of the penis in men. HPV can also cause anal cancer, cancer of the throat and genital warts in both men and women.


When should my child be vaccinated?

It is recommended that preteens, both male and female, put the HPV vaccine at age 11 or 12 years old so that they are protected until they are exposed to the virus. If your teen not has been the vaccine still, talk to your doctor to make it be as soon as possible.

The HPV vaccine is given in 3 doses. The second dose should be 1 or 2 months after the first and the third dose should be administered 6 months after the first. Make sure that your child wear 3 doses to ensure the best protection.


Teen outdoors.

What else should I know about the HPV vaccine?

There are two vaccines against HPV. Girls between 11 and 12 years of age) and young women between 13 and 26 years any of them should be placed to prevent cancer of the cervix.

One vaccine also protects against genital warts and anal cancer in women as in men. Children need to be with this HPV vaccine to prevent anal cancer and genital warts. Girls can be this vaccine to prevent cancer of the cervix, anal cancer and genital warts.

Very careful studies of both HPV vaccines have been performed and these studies have shown that no serious security concern there is with them. Some side effects that have been reported in these studies include pain in the arm, on the site that has been the injection, fever, dizziness and nausea.

Some preteens and teens you can pass out after receiving the HPV vaccine or any other vaccine.Preteens and teens must sit or lie when they put the vaccine and remain so for about 15 minutes after receiving the injection. This can help prevent fainting or other injury that could happen to the faint.

Serious side effects of the HPV vaccine are rare. It is important to tell the doctor or nurse your child if you have any severe allergies, including allergy against the latex or yeast. He is not recommended to put the HPV vaccine to women who are pregnant.

Centres stop Control and prevention of diseases (CDC), all American Academy of family physicians, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the society of adolescent medicine and health recommended vaccines against HPV.


Where can I get more information?

For more information on HPV vaccines and other vaccines for pre-teens and teens talk with the doctor or the nurse her son. You can also get more information is available on the web site "Vaccines for pre-teens and teenagers" from CDC at the following address:cdc.gov ohttp://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/teensAclaraci?n sobre los enlaces a sitios web externos (for more information).


How can I get help to pay for these vaccines?

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To protect students at career colleges from becoming burdened by student loan debt they cannot repay !

 These regulations will hold career training programs accountable for putting their students on the path to success, and they complement action across the Administration to protect consumers and prevent and investigate fraud, waste and abuse, particularly at for-profit colleges.

"Career colleges must be a stepping stone to the middle class. But too many hard-working students find themselves buried in debt with little to show for it. That is simply unacceptable," U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said. "These regulations are a necessary step to ensure that colleges accepting federal funds protect students, cut costs and improve outcomes. We will continue to take action as needed."

To qualify for federal student aid, the law requires that most for-profit programs and certificate programs at private non-profit and public institutions prepare students for "gainful employment in a recognized occupation." Under the regulations finalized today, a program would be considered to lead to gainful employment if the estimated annual loan payment of a typical graduate does not exceed 20 percent of his or her discretionary income or 8 percent of his or her total earnings. Programs that exceed these levels would be at risk of losing their ability to participate in taxpayer-funded federal student aid programs.

The final gainful employment regulations follow an extensive rulemaking process involving public hearings, negotiations and about 95,000 public comments. The regulations, which will go into effect on July 1, 2015, reflect the feedback the Department received, and aim to protect Americans from poor career training programs by targeting those programs that leave students buried in debt with few opportunities to repay it. Highlights of the rule include:

  • Preventing students from being buried in debt: Based on available data, the Department estimates that about 1,400 programs serving 840,000 students—of whom 99 percent are at for-profit institutions—would not pass the accountability standards. All programs will have the opportunity to make immediate changes that could help them avoid sanctions, but if these programs do not improve, they will ultimately become ineligible for federal student aid—which often makes up nearly 90 percent of the revenue at for-profit institutions.
  • More rigorous accountability than previous regulations: The new regulations are tougher than the Department's 2011 rules because they set a higher passing requirement and lay out a shorter path to ineligibility for the poorest-performing programs. In 2012, the Department estimated that 193 programs would not have passed the previous regulations; with respect to these new regulations, based on available data, the Department estimates that about 1,400 programs would not pass the accountability metric.
  • Providing transparency about student success: The rule also provides useful information for all students and consumers by requiring institutions to provide important information about their programs, like what their former students are earning, their success at graduating, and the amount of debt they accumulated.
  • Improving student outcomes: The regulations build on momentum toward increased accountability in higher education by setting standards for career training programs, including programs offered by for-profit institutions, to ensure they are serving students well. While the Department has seen encouraging changes in the past five years, it believes all career training programs can and should meet higher expectations.

Today, the Department is also taking new steps to formalize partnerships with several federal agencies to enhance cooperation and ensure proper oversight of for-profit institutions of higher education through an interagency task force.

Background on the Administration's efforts to protect students from poor-performing career colleges Too often, students at career colleges—including thousands of veterans—are charged excessive costs, but don't get the education they paid for. Instead, students in such programs are provided with poor quality training, often for low-wage jobs or in occupations where there are simply no job opportunities. They find themselves with large amounts of debt and, too often, end up in default. In many cases, students are drawn into these programs with confusing or misleading information.

The situation for students at for-profit institutions is particularly troubling. On average, attending a two-year for-profit institution costs a student four times as much as attending a community college. More than 80 percent of students at for-profits borrow, while less than half of students at public institutions do. Ultimately, students at for-profit colleges represent only about 11 percent of the total higher education population but 44 percent of all federal student loan defaults.

In response to these concerns, in 2009, the Department began extensive conversations with the higher education community about the role of career colleges, particularly on how they could be held accountable for the outcomes of their students. Following a 2012 court decision, which affirmed the U.S. Department of Education's authority to regulate in this area in order to protect students and taxpayers, the Department undertook new efforts to make sure career training programs provide affordable pathways to good jobs.

The Department believes many institutions have already started to take steps to improve. Some of the largest institutions have instituted trial periods for programs before students have to commit, so students can decide if that program is right for them. There are reports that institutions have decreased program lengths. Some are reducing costs. And a few institutions have closed some locations and programs they judge to be performing poorly.

But the Department also believes there is still potential for improvement in many of these programs—public, private non-profit and for-profit—so it is taking action to spur more change.

The gainful employment regulations are a central part of the Administration's work to ensure that student debt is affordable and that for-profit colleges serve students well. These regulations complement other efforts taken by the Administration to protect students by addressing problems at poor performing institutions, particularly in the for-profit sector. These efforts include:

  • Formalizing an interagency oversight task force The Department will lead an effort to formalize an interagency task force to help ensure proper oversight of for-profit institutions of higher education. In particular, the Department and other federal and state agencies will coordinate their activities and promote information sharing to protect students from unfair, deceptive, and abusive policies and practices. The task force will build on efforts already underway among various federal agencies, and include the Departments of Justice, Treasury and Veterans Affairs, as well as the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, Federal Trade Commission, and the Securities and Exchange Commission. In addition, state attorneys general will also be invited to continue their participation in this collaboration. Given the important responsibilities each of these federal agencies has, and the vital role that states play, the agencies will leverage their resources and expertise to assist one another, thereby making the best use of scarce resources and better protecting the interests of students and taxpayers. This task force will formalize and strengthen a working group that has been working together over the past year and that has coordinated efforts in several reviews and investigatory work. The task force will meet as needed, but at least once each quarter.

  • Keeping student debt affordable The Department is helping more students manage their student debt through flexible repayment options like the Pay As You Earn plan, which caps student loan payments at 10 percent of a borrower's discretionary income. In addition, the Administration continues targeted outreach to help borrowers who may be struggling to repay their loans, ensuring that they have the information they need to select the best repayment option for them and avoid future default.

  • Developing a college ratings system The Department is also working on a new college ratings system, which will showcase colleges and universities that are effective in improving student success; incentivize institutions to work toward the most important goals, like graduating low-income students and holding down costs; and help students and families choose their school based on the value it provides for their investment.

  • Strengthening oversight of the programs on which our nation's service members and veterans rely Through Executive Order 13607, the Principles of Excellence for Educational Institutions Serving Service Members, Veterans, Spouses, and Other Family Members, the Administration has worked to protect our nation's military families by ensuring that federal military and veterans educational benefits programs are providing service members, veterans, spouses, and other family members with the information, support, and protections they deserve. This includes: establishing a centralized complaint system; new, risk-based program reviews informed by students complaints to focus enforcement efforts at the Departments of Veterans Affairs, Defense, Education and Justice, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, and the Federal Trade Commission; and key tools and resources like the online GI Bill ® Comparison Tool, which has made it easier for over 450,000 veterans, service members and their dependents to select education and training programs that provide a good value and meet their needs.




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