WARSAW INDIANA NEWS AND BLOG


Latest News - WARSAW INDIANA

Lakeland Financial misses Street 4Q forecasts


(AP) _ Lakeland Financial Corp. (LKFN) on Monday reported fourth-quarter profit of $11.1 million. The bank, based in Warsaw, Indiana, said it had earnings of 66 cents per share. The results did not meet Wall Street expectations. The average estimate of ...

NOTICE OF DEMAND OF PAYMENT


Schumaker was ordered on August 26, 2014 to demolish and remove the unsafe building located on real property situate in Kosciusko County, Indiana, which real property is commonly known as 690 East Lakewood Avenue, Warsaw, Indiana, 46580, and legally ...

Lakeland Financial Reports Record Performance


Lakeland Financial Corporation is a $3.4 billion bank holding company headquartered in Warsaw, Indiana. Lake City Bank, its single bank subsidiary, is the fourth largest bank in the state, and the largest bank 100% invested in Indiana. Lake City Bank ...

C. Dea Hethcote


C. Dea Hethcote of Warsaw, Indiana passed away at 2:35 p.m. on Thursday, January 21, 2015 after a short stay at Millers Merry Manor of Warsaw at the age of 77. Prior to this, his wife Donna, served as his caregiver for the last two years in their home.

Purdue takes moment to remember student killed in classroom


Investigators say Cody Cousins of Warsaw, Indiana, attacked the 21-year-old Boldt on Jan. 21, 2014, in a classroom filled with students. The West Bend, Wisconsin, man died after being shot five times and stabbed. Cousins was sentenced in September to 65 ...

Moment of silence planned for slain Purdue student


Investigators say Cody Cousins of Warsaw, Indiana, attacked the 21-year-old Boldt on Jan. 21, 2014, before a classroom filled with students. The West Bend, Wisconsin, man died after being shot five times and stabbed. Cousins was sentenced in September to ...

Sweetwater Announces New Execs


Vice President of Finance Greg Clark joins Sweetwater after working the past four years as Internal Audit Director at Symmetry Medical, Inc. based in Warsaw, Indiana. He is a Fort Wayne native who began his career at KPMG in Raleigh, North Carolina ...

5 things to know for your Thursday in Indiana


With the night’s doubleheader delayed by more than one hour, Warsaw radio voice Roger Grossman took the opportunity to bask in the history of one of the state’s top gymnasiums. Check out his full story on The Fan Indiana’s website. Someone knows more ...

Diana J. Engelhaupt


Diana J. Engelhaupt, 51 of Warsaw, Indiana, passed away at 5:05 a.m. Saturday, January 10, 2015, in her residence. On January 22, 1963, she was born in Deadwood, South Dakota, to Joseph A. and Virginia (Hindman) Engelhaupt. Diana graduated from Sundance ...

Kosciusko and Warsaw officers ask for public assistance in locating two suspects in connection to meth lab


Troopers from the Indiana Clandestine Lab Team were called to the residence to secure the scene. The Warsaw Narcotic Unit and Kosciusko County Drug Task Force are asking the public for information about the location of the homeowners, Richard Lattea and ...




SPECIAL INFORMATION FOR WARSAW

Avoiding job scams in WARSAW

Scammers know that finding a job can be tough. To trick people looking for honest work, scammers advertise where real employers and job placement firms do. They also make upbeat promises about your chances of employment, and virtually all of them ask you to pay them for their services before you get a job. But the promise of a job isn’t the same thing as a job. If you have to pay for the promise, it’s likely a scam.

Signs of a Job Scam

Scammers advertise jobs where legitimate employers do — online, in newspapers, and even on TV and radio. Here’s how to tell whether a job lead may be a scam:

You need to pay to get the job

They may say they’ve got a job waiting, or guarantee to place you in a job, if you just pay a fee for certification, training materials, or their expenses placing you with a company. But after you pay, the job doesn’t materialize. Employers and employment firms shouldn’t ask you to pay for the promise of a job.

You need to supply your credit card or bank account information

Don´t give out your credit card or bank account information over the phone to a company unless you´re familiar with them and have agreed to pay for something. Anyone who has your account information can use it.

The ad is for "previously undisclosed" federal government jobs

Information about available federal jobs is free. And all federal positions are announced to the public on usajobs.gov. Don’t believe anyone who promises you a federal or postal job.

Job Placement Services

Many job placement services are legitimate. But others lie about what they’ll do for you, promote outdated or fake job openings, or charge up-front fees for services that may not lead to a job. In fact, they might not even return your calls once you pay.

Before you enlist a company’s help:

Check with the hiring company

If a company or organization is mentioned in an ad or interview, contact that company to find out if the company really is hiring through the service.

Get details — in writing

What’s the cost, what will you get, and who pays — you or the company that hires you? What happens if the service doesn’t find a job for you or any real leads? If they’re reluctant to answer your questions, or give confusing answers, you should be reluctant to work with them.

Get a copy of the contract with the placement firm, and read it carefully. A legitimate company will give you time to read the contract and decide, not pressure you into signing then and there. Make sure any promises — including refund promises — are in writing. Some listing services and "consultants" write ads to sound like jobs, but that’s just a marketing trick: They´re really selling general information about getting a job — information you can find for free on your own.

Know whether it’s job placement or job counseling

Executive or career counseling services help people with career directions and decisions. They may offer services like skills identification and self-evaluation, resume preparation, letter writing, and interview techniques, and general information about companies or organizations in a particular location or job field.

But job placement isn’t guaranteed. Fees can be as high as thousands of dollars, and you often have to pay first.

The National Career Development Association (NCDA) offers some tips on finding and choosing a career counselor, and explains the different types of counselors active in the field.

Check for complaints

Your local consumer protection agency, state Attorney General´s Office, and the Better Business Bureau can tell you whether any complaints have been filed about a company. Just keep in mind that a lack of complaints doesn’t mean the business is on the up-and-up. You may want to do an internet search with the name of the company and words like review, scam, or complaint. Look through several pages of search results. And check out articles about the company in newspapers, magazines, or online, as well.

Where to Look for Jobs

You’ve read the many resume and interview tips from respected sources available for free online, and scoured online job boards and newspaper classifieds. Some other places to look for leads in your job search include:

CareerOneStop

Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor, CareerOneStop lists hundreds of thousands of jobs. It also links to employment and training programs in each state, including programs for people with disabilities, minorities, older workers, veterans, welfare recipients, and young people. For federal jobs, all open federal positions are announced to the public on usajobs.gov.

State and county offices

Your state’s Department of Labor may have job listings or be able to point you to local job offices that offer counseling and referrals. Local and county human resources offices provide some placement assistance, too. They can give you the names of other groups that may be helpful, such as labor unions or federally-funded vocational programs.

College career service offices

Whether it’s a four-year university or community college, see what help yours can offer. If you’re not a current or former student, some still may let you look at their job listings.

Your library

Ask if they can point you to information on writing a resume, interviewing, or compiling a list of companies and organizations to contact about job openings.

Report a Job Scam

If you’ve been targeted by a job scam, file a complaint with the FTC.

For problems with an employment-service firm, contact the appropriate state licensing board (if these firms must be licensed in your state), your state Attorney General, and your local consumer protection agency.

To learn about credit and background checks when you’re looking for a job, read What to Know When You Look For a Job.

[7]

WARSAW INDIANA tspan:3m WARSAW INDIANA




Avoiding job scams in WARSAW

Scammers know that finding a job can be tough. To trick people looking for honest work, scammers advertise where real employers and job placement firms do. They also make upbeat promises about your chances of employment, and virtually all of them ask you to pay them for their services before you get a job. But the promise of a job isn’t the same thing as a job. If you have to pay for the promise, it’s likely a scam.

Signs of a Job Scam

Scammers advertise jobs where legitimate employers do — online, in newspapers, and even on TV and radio. Here’s how to tell whether a job lead may be a scam:

You need to pay to get the job

They may say they’ve got a job waiting, or guarantee to place you in a job, if you just pay a fee for certification, training materials, or their expenses placing you with a company. But after you pay, the job doesn’t materialize. Employers and employment firms shouldn’t ask you to pay for the promise of a job.

You need to supply your credit card or bank account information

Don´t give out your credit card or bank account information over the phone to a company unless you´re familiar with them and have agreed to pay for something. Anyone who has your account information can use it.

The ad is for "previously undisclosed" federal government jobs

Information about available federal jobs is free. And all federal positions are announced to the public on usajobs.gov. Don’t believe anyone who promises you a federal or postal job.

Job Placement Services

Many job placement services are legitimate. But others lie about what they’ll do for you, promote outdated or fake job openings, or charge up-front fees for services that may not lead to a job. In fact, they might not even return your calls once you pay.

Before you enlist a company’s help:

Check with the hiring company

If a company or organization is mentioned in an ad or interview, contact that company to find out if the company really is hiring through the service.

Get details — in writing

What’s the cost, what will you get, and who pays — you or the company that hires you? What happens if the service doesn’t find a job for you or any real leads? If they’re reluctant to answer your questions, or give confusing answers, you should be reluctant to work with them.

Get a copy of the contract with the placement firm, and read it carefully. A legitimate company will give you time to read the contract and decide, not pressure you into signing then and there. Make sure any promises — including refund promises — are in writing. Some listing services and "consultants" write ads to sound like jobs, but that’s just a marketing trick: They´re really selling general information about getting a job — information you can find for free on your own.

Know whether it’s job placement or job counseling

Executive or career counseling services help people with career directions and decisions. They may offer services like skills identification and self-evaluation, resume preparation, letter writing, and interview techniques, and general information about companies or organizations in a particular location or job field.

But job placement isn’t guaranteed. Fees can be as high as thousands of dollars, and you often have to pay first.

The National Career Development Association (NCDA) offers some tips on finding and choosing a career counselor, and explains the different types of counselors active in the field.

Check for complaints

Your local consumer protection agency, state Attorney General´s Office, and the Better Business Bureau can tell you whether any complaints have been filed about a company. Just keep in mind that a lack of complaints doesn’t mean the business is on the up-and-up. You may want to do an internet search with the name of the company and words like review, scam, or complaint. Look through several pages of search results. And check out articles about the company in newspapers, magazines, or online, as well.

Where to Look for Jobs

You’ve read the many resume and interview tips from respected sources available for free online, and scoured online job boards and newspaper classifieds. Some other places to look for leads in your job search include:

CareerOneStop

Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor, CareerOneStop lists hundreds of thousands of jobs. It also links to employment and training programs in each state, including programs for people with disabilities, minorities, older workers, veterans, welfare recipients, and young people. For federal jobs, all open federal positions are announced to the public on usajobs.gov.

State and county offices

Your state’s Department of Labor may have job listings or be able to point you to local job offices that offer counseling and referrals. Local and county human resources offices provide some placement assistance, too. They can give you the names of other groups that may be helpful, such as labor unions or federally-funded vocational programs.

College career service offices

Whether it’s a four-year university or community college, see what help yours can offer. If you’re not a current or former student, some still may let you look at their job listings.

Your library

Ask if they can point you to information on writing a resume, interviewing, or compiling a list of companies and organizations to contact about job openings.

Report a Job Scam

If you’ve been targeted by a job scam, file a complaint with the FTC.

For problems with an employment-service firm, contact the appropriate state licensing board (if these firms must be licensed in your state), your state Attorney General, and your local consumer protection agency.

To learn about credit and background checks when you’re looking for a job, read What to Know When You Look For a Job.

[7]



Avoiding cyberbullyng in WARSAW

Cyberbullying is bullying that takes place using electronic technology. Electronic technology includes devices and equipment such as cell phones, computers, and tablets as well as communication tools including social media sites, text messages, chat, and websites.

Examples of cyberbullying include mean text messages or emails, rumors sent by email or posted on social networking sites, and embarrassing pictures, videos, websites, or fake profiles.

Why Cyberbullying is Different

Kids who are being cyberbullied are often bullied in person as well. Additionally, kids who are cyberbullied have a harder time getting away from the behavior.

  • Cyberbullying can happen 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and reach a kid even when he or she is alone. It can happen any time of the day or night.
  • Cyberbullying messages and images can be posted anonymously and distributed quickly to a very wide audience. It can be difficult and sometimes impossible to trace the source.
  • Deleting inappropriate or harassing messages, texts, and pictures is extremely difficult after they have been posted or sent.

Back to top

Effects of Cyberbullying

Cell phones and computers themselves are not to blame for cyberbullying. Social media sites can be used for positive activities, like connecting kids with friends and family, helping students with school, and for entertainment. But these tools can also be used to hurt other people. Whether done in person or through technology, the effects of bullying are similar.

Kids who are cyberbullied are more likely to:

  • Use alcohol and drugs
  • Skip school
  • Experience in-person bullying
  • Be unwilling to attend school
  • Receive poor grades
  • Have lower self-esteem
  • Have more health problems

Back to top

Frequency of Cyberbullying

The 2010-2011 School Crime Supplement (National Center for Education Statistics and Bureau of Justice Statistics) indicates that 9% of students in grades 6–12 experienced cyberbullying.

The 2013 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey finds that 15% of high school students (grades 9-12) were electronically bullied in the past year.

Research on cyberbullying is growing. However, because kids’ technology use changes rapidly, it is difficult to design surveys that accurately capture trends.

Back to top

[26]






We selected WARSAW INDIANA LAST NEWS AND IMPORTANT ISSUES. Share!

Feed Widget


If people in the media cannot decide whether they are in the
business of reporting news or manufacturing propaganda,
it is all the more important that the public understand
that difference,and choose their news sources accordingly.
Thomas Sowell

Newsof.org. Selected the top stories of the city of WARSAW INDIANA. Political events, traffic accidents on highways, downtown events, neighborhoods and inside. Also researched local newspapers and social networks, as well as the site of City Hall. Crimes, are always subject to demand generally for information. Also the tragedies and disasters such as fires, floods, flooding, rain, hail and winds. Tags: Breaking News, WARSAW INDIANA, City, Indoors, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday , Friday, Saturday, Sunday, Car, Crash, Elections, Beating, Accident, Crime, Police, Criminal, Police, Road, Highway Access, Elections, Party, Hail, Rain, Flood, Anniversary, Award, Month, Week End , Today, Yesterday, Female, Male, Family, Child, People.