WELLSBURG WEST VIRGINIA NEWS AND BLOG


Latest News - WELLSBURG WEST VIRGINIA

Funding for new bridge discussed


WELLSBURG - Plans for a new Ohio River bridge continue to move forward, with officials from the Ohio and West Virginia departments of transportation reaching an agreement on funding for its preliminary stages.

FirstEnergy unit spends $198 million on T&D system enhancements


Wellsburg, Weirton and Weston areas. · Investing about $20 million to provide electrical service to new residential and commercial customers in north-central West Virginia, including Morgantown, Fairmont, Parkersburg and Weirton. · Completing an $11 ...

FirstEnergy Invested $198 Million in 2014 in the Mon Power Service Area to Help Enhance Electric System


Wellsburg, Weirton and Weston areas. Investing about $20 million to provide electrical service to new residential and commercial customers in north-central West Virginia, including Morgantown, Fairmont, Parkersburg and Weirton. Completing an $11 million ...

Wellsburg Middle School approved for officer


Wellsburg City Manager Mark Henne said the school board has agreed to commit $30,000 toward the $42,000 cost for the officer in the school. Henne said they plan to ask the state of West Virginia for help with the rest of the costs. "The school board has ...

Man shot with arrow in West Virginia dies


A West Virginia man died yesterday after he was shot with an arrow. Wesley Plants, 51, of Wellsburg, was shot Thursday morning at his home. Police believe Plants may have been targeted. No arrests have been made, but police said they’re looking for a ...

West Virginia man dies after being shot with arrow in Wellsburg


WELLSBURG, W.Va. — Police are investigating the death of a man who was shot with an arrow in Brooke County. Police tell media outlets that 51-year-old Wesley Plants of Wellsburg was shot Thursday morning at his home. After Plants was shot, Wellsburg ...

Man Dies After Being Shot With Arrow In West Virginia


WELLSBURG, W.Va. (AP) – Police are investigating the death of man who was shot with an arrow in Brooke County, W. Va. Police tell media outlets that the incident occurred Thursday morning. The victim had been shot in the back. The man’s name hasn’t ...

W.Va Secretary of State Natalie Tennant in Wellsburg Friday for Talk on Minimum Wage


WELLSBURG - West Virginia Secretary of State and U.S. Senate nominee Natalie Tennant will be in Brooke County on Friday afternoon to call for a raise to the federal minimum wage. Tennant will make a stop at Jackie's Florist and Crafts in Wellsburg at 2:30 ...

Anti-pirate training in West Virginia


On the Ohio River, former sea captain Tim Nease and his company International Maritime Security Network demonstrate how to defend ships against pirate attacks. The BBC's Daniel Nasaw went to Wellsburg, West Virginia to look at their methods.

Wellsburg, West Virginia Vacation Rentals


Wellsburg, West Virginia offers great vacation house rental and home rental-by-owner deals for the knowledgeable traveler. No matter what budget or level of comfort you seek in your holiday to Wellsburg, WV, there's surely a great local vacation home ...




SPECIAL INFORMATION FOR WELLSBURG

Avoiding job scams in WELLSBURG

Scammers know that finding a job can be tough. To trick people looking for honest work, scammers advertise where real employers and job placement firms do. They also make upbeat promises about your chances of employment, and virtually all of them ask you to pay them for their services before you get a job. But the promise of a job isn’t the same thing as a job. If you have to pay for the promise, it’s likely a scam.

Signs of a Job Scam

Scammers advertise jobs where legitimate employers do — online, in newspapers, and even on TV and radio. Here’s how to tell whether a job lead may be a scam:

You need to pay to get the job

They may say they’ve got a job waiting, or guarantee to place you in a job, if you just pay a fee for certification, training materials, or their expenses placing you with a company. But after you pay, the job doesn’t materialize. Employers and employment firms shouldn’t ask you to pay for the promise of a job.

You need to supply your credit card or bank account information

Don´t give out your credit card or bank account information over the phone to a company unless you´re familiar with them and have agreed to pay for something. Anyone who has your account information can use it.

The ad is for "previously undisclosed" federal government jobs

Information about available federal jobs is free. And all federal positions are announced to the public on usajobs.gov. Don’t believe anyone who promises you a federal or postal job.

Job Placement Services

Many job placement services are legitimate. But others lie about what they’ll do for you, promote outdated or fake job openings, or charge up-front fees for services that may not lead to a job. In fact, they might not even return your calls once you pay.

Before you enlist a company’s help:

Check with the hiring company

If a company or organization is mentioned in an ad or interview, contact that company to find out if the company really is hiring through the service.

Get details — in writing

What’s the cost, what will you get, and who pays — you or the company that hires you? What happens if the service doesn’t find a job for you or any real leads? If they’re reluctant to answer your questions, or give confusing answers, you should be reluctant to work with them.

Get a copy of the contract with the placement firm, and read it carefully. A legitimate company will give you time to read the contract and decide, not pressure you into signing then and there. Make sure any promises — including refund promises — are in writing. Some listing services and "consultants" write ads to sound like jobs, but that’s just a marketing trick: They´re really selling general information about getting a job — information you can find for free on your own.

Know whether it’s job placement or job counseling

Executive or career counseling services help people with career directions and decisions. They may offer services like skills identification and self-evaluation, resume preparation, letter writing, and interview techniques, and general information about companies or organizations in a particular location or job field.

But job placement isn’t guaranteed. Fees can be as high as thousands of dollars, and you often have to pay first.

The National Career Development Association (NCDA) offers some tips on finding and choosing a career counselor, and explains the different types of counselors active in the field.

Check for complaints

Your local consumer protection agency, state Attorney General´s Office, and the Better Business Bureau can tell you whether any complaints have been filed about a company. Just keep in mind that a lack of complaints doesn’t mean the business is on the up-and-up. You may want to do an internet search with the name of the company and words like review, scam, or complaint. Look through several pages of search results. And check out articles about the company in newspapers, magazines, or online, as well.

Where to Look for Jobs

You’ve read the many resume and interview tips from respected sources available for free online, and scoured online job boards and newspaper classifieds. Some other places to look for leads in your job search include:

CareerOneStop

Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor, CareerOneStop lists hundreds of thousands of jobs. It also links to employment and training programs in each state, including programs for people with disabilities, minorities, older workers, veterans, welfare recipients, and young people. For federal jobs, all open federal positions are announced to the public on usajobs.gov.

State and county offices

Your state’s Department of Labor may have job listings or be able to point you to local job offices that offer counseling and referrals. Local and county human resources offices provide some placement assistance, too. They can give you the names of other groups that may be helpful, such as labor unions or federally-funded vocational programs.

College career service offices

Whether it’s a four-year university or community college, see what help yours can offer. If you’re not a current or former student, some still may let you look at their job listings.

Your library

Ask if they can point you to information on writing a resume, interviewing, or compiling a list of companies and organizations to contact about job openings.

Report a Job Scam

If you’ve been targeted by a job scam, file a complaint with the FTC.

For problems with an employment-service firm, contact the appropriate state licensing board (if these firms must be licensed in your state), your state Attorney General, and your local consumer protection agency.

To learn about credit and background checks when you’re looking for a job, read What to Know When You Look For a Job.

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Warning in WELLSBURG: Government Grant Scams

“Because you pay your income taxes on time, you have been awarded a free $12,500 government grant! To get your grant, simply give us your checking account information, and we will direct-deposit the grant into your bank account!”

Sometimes, it’s an ad that claims you will qualify to receive a “free grant” to pay for education costs, home repairs, home business expenses, or unpaid bills. Other times, it’s a phone call supposedly from a “government” agency or some other organization with an official sounding name. In either case, the claim is the same: your application for a grant is guaranteed to be accepted, and you’ll never have to pay the money back.

But the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the nation’s consumer protection agency, says that “money for nothing” grant offers usually are scams, whether you see them in your local paper or a national magazine, or hear about them on the phone.

Some scam artists advertise “free grants” in the classifieds, inviting readers to call a toll-free number for more information. Others are more bold: they call you out of the blue. They lie about where they’re calling from, or they claim legitimacy using an official-sounding name like the “Federal Grants Administration.” They may ask you some basic questions to determine if you “qualify” to receive a grant. FTC attorneys say calls and come-ons for free money invariably are rip offs.

Grant scammers generally follow a script: they congratulate you on your eligibility, then ask for your checking account information so they can “deposit your grant directly into your account,” or cover a one-time “processing fee.” The caller may even reassure you that you can get a refund if you’re not satisfied. In fact, you’ll never see the grant they promise; they will disappear with your money.

The FTC says following a few basic rules can keep consumers from losing money to these “government grant” scams:

  • Don’t give out your bank account information to anyone you don’t know. Scammers pressure people to divulge their bank account information so that they can steal the money in the account. Always keep your bank account information confidential. Don’t share it unless you are familiar with the company and know why the information is necessary.
  • Don’t pay any money for a “free” government grant. If you have to pay money to claim a “free” government grant, it isn’t really free. A real government agency won’t ask you to pay a processing fee for a grant that you have already been awarded — or to pay for a list of grant-making institutions. The names of agencies and foundations that award grants are available for free at any public library or on the Internet. The only official access point for all federal grant-making agencies is www.grants.gov.
  • Look-alikes aren’t the real thing. Just because the caller says he’s from the “Federal Grants Administration” doesn’t mean that he is. There is no such government agency. Take a moment to check the blue pages in your telephone directory to bear out your hunch — or not.
  • Phone numbers can deceive. Some con artists use Internet technology to disguise their area code in caller ID systems. Although it may look like they’re calling from Washington, DC, they could be calling from anywhere in the world.
  • Take control of the calls you receive. If you want to reduce the number of telemarketing calls you receive, place your telephone number on the National Do Not Call Registry. To register online, visit donotcall.gov. To register by phone, call 1-888-382-1222 (TTY: 1-866-290-4236) from the phone number you wish to register.
  • File a complaint with the FTC. If you think you may have been a victim of a government grant scam, file a complaint with the FTC online, or call toll-free, 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357); TTY: 1-866-653-4261. The FTC enters Internet, telemarketing, identity theft, and other fraud-related complaints into Consumer Sentinel, a secure online database available to hundreds of civil and criminal law enforcement agencies in the U.S. and abroad.
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Aids to study in WELLSBURG

Financial aid is available from a variety of sources for college, career school, graduate school, and professional school.

 Financial aid is money to help pay for college or career school. Aid can come from

Besides financial aid, you also should think about what you can do to lower your costs when you go to college.

“Types of Federal Student Aid” Video

Check out this video to learn about grants, loans, and work-study jobs and how they can help fund your education. (Captioning available in English and Spanish; just start the video and click on the CC symbol at the bottom.)

View accessible version (wmv)


Aid and Other Resources From the Federal Government

The federal government offers a number of financial aid programs. Besides aid from the U.S. Department of Education (discussed below), you also might get

The U.S. Department of Education awards about $150 billion a year in grants, work-study funds, and low-interestloans to more than 15 million students. Federal student aid covers such expenses as tuition and fees, room and board, books and supplies, and transportation. Aid also can help pay for other related expenses, such as a computer and dependent care. Thousands of schools across the country participate in the federal student aid programs; ask the schools you’re interested in whether they do!

Federal student aid includes:

  • Grants—financial aid that doesn’t have to be repaid (unless, for example, you withdraw from school and owe a refund)
  • Loans— borrowed money for college or career school; you must repay your loans, with interest
  • Work-Study—a work program through which you earn money to help you pay for school

Use FAFSA4caster to get an estimate of how much aid you might receive from the U.S. Department of Education.

Apply for federal student aid using the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA®). And remember, the first F in “FAFSA” stands for “free”—you shouldn’t pay to fill out the FAFSA!

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Aid From Your State Government

Even if you´re not eligible for federal aid, you might be eligible for financial aid from your state. Contact your state grant agency for more information.

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Aid From Your College or Career School

Many colleges offer financial aid from their own funds. Find out what might be available to you:

  • Visit your school’s financial aid page on its website, or ask someone in the financial aid office.
  • Ask at the department that offers your course of study; they might have a scholarship for students in your major.
  • Fill out any applications the school requires for its own aid, and meet the deadlines.

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Aid From a Nonprofit or Private Organization

Many organizations offer scholarships or grants to help students pay for college. This free money can make a real difference in how affordable your education is.

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