WHITELAND INDIANA NEWS AND BLOG


Latest News - WHITELAND INDIANA

Rail worries: 4 mayors voice safety, noise concerns on train project


before the board makes a final decision on the proposed upgrade to the Louisville & Indiana Railroad line. That line runs along the east side of U.S. 31 in Johnson County, through Greenwood, Whiteland, Franklin and Edinburgh, and the project could add 10 ...

Bill aims to help teachers deal with dyslexic students


INDIANAPOLIS — One in five individuals have dyslexia and Rep. Woody Burton, R-Whiteland, has authored a bill to address the issue inside Indiana classrooms. House Bill 1108, which defines dyslexia and trains teachers to recognize it, would put students ...

Central-Indiana couple prepares for arrival of rare identical triplets


Matt was born and raised in Hancock County and has family nearby. Ashley's from Whiteland, so her family is less than an hour away. And there are friends and church acquaintances to lean on. "How? We don't know, we don't have an exact plan," Ashley said.

Back-to-back tournaments draw duelers to Camp Lejeune


The National Collegiate Athletic Association surveyed its sports and decided that fencing is closest to golf in the number of injuries," said the Whiteland, Indiana, native. "The Olympics rates fencing as safer than swimming, badminton and table tennis."

Debate over state pension plan shift ahead at Statehouse


INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) — A proposal that would begin eliminating Indiana’s traditional public pension plan appears to be headed for a legislative compromise. Rep. Woody Burton (R-Whiteland) proposed phasing out the state’s current pension system ...

Hot shooting lifts New Pal girls past Whiteland


New Palestine 48, Whiteland 40 The Dragons led from wire-to-wire in a victory ...
The Royals swim again Wednesday, when they host Elwood. Eastern Hancock took down Indiana School for the Deaf (42-32), Anderson (34-26), Anderson Prep (81-0), Hagerstown ...

Global Syn-Turf is Invited to Bid On the Whiteland High School Athletic Fields Improvements Project in Whiteland, IN


The Whiteland, Indiana-based Clark-Pleasant school district was looking for $3 million to improve athletic fields since September, 2012. The improvements include replacements of the football fields with artificial turf, new running tracks and softball ...

Indiana Members Foundation Canvas for a Cause raises over $700 for local high school marching band


the charitable arm of Indiana Members Credit Union, recently donated $716.80 to the Whiteland Community High School Band Department, located in Whiteland, Indiana, through its Canvas for a Cause fundraiser. Indiana Members Foundation hosted the event at ...

Indiana American Water Acquires New Whiteland Water System in Central Indiana


GREENWOOD, Ind.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Indiana American Water President Alan DeBoy today announced the company’s acquisition of a water system from the Town of New Whiteland in central Indiana. The purchase of the system adds approximately 2,100 customers to ...




SPECIAL INFORMATION FOR WHITELAND

Aids to study in WHITELAND

Financial aid is available from a variety of sources for college, career school, graduate school, and professional school.

 Financial aid is money to help pay for college or career school. Aid can come from

Besides financial aid, you also should think about what you can do to lower your costs when you go to college.

“Types of Federal Student Aid” Video

Check out this video to learn about grants, loans, and work-study jobs and how they can help fund your education. (Captioning available in English and Spanish; just start the video and click on the CC symbol at the bottom.)

View accessible version (wmv)


Aid and Other Resources From the Federal Government

The federal government offers a number of financial aid programs. Besides aid from the U.S. Department of Education (discussed below), you also might get

The U.S. Department of Education awards about $150 billion a year in grants, work-study funds, and low-interestloans to more than 15 million students. Federal student aid covers such expenses as tuition and fees, room and board, books and supplies, and transportation. Aid also can help pay for other related expenses, such as a computer and dependent care. Thousands of schools across the country participate in the federal student aid programs; ask the schools you’re interested in whether they do!

Federal student aid includes:

  • Grants—financial aid that doesn’t have to be repaid (unless, for example, you withdraw from school and owe a refund)
  • Loans— borrowed money for college or career school; you must repay your loans, with interest
  • Work-Study—a work program through which you earn money to help you pay for school

Use FAFSA4caster to get an estimate of how much aid you might receive from the U.S. Department of Education.

Apply for federal student aid using the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA®). And remember, the first F in “FAFSA” stands for “free”—you shouldn’t pay to fill out the FAFSA!

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Aid From Your State Government

Even if you´re not eligible for federal aid, you might be eligible for financial aid from your state. Contact your state grant agency for more information.

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Aid From Your College or Career School

Many colleges offer financial aid from their own funds. Find out what might be available to you:

  • Visit your school’s financial aid page on its website, or ask someone in the financial aid office.
  • Ask at the department that offers your course of study; they might have a scholarship for students in your major.
  • Fill out any applications the school requires for its own aid, and meet the deadlines.

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Aid From a Nonprofit or Private Organization

Many organizations offer scholarships or grants to help students pay for college. This free money can make a real difference in how affordable your education is.

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WHITELAND INDIANA tspan:3m WHITELAND INDIANA




Responding To and Protecting Students from Sexual Assault in WHITELAND

January 26, 2015

Courtesy of Eve Hill and Mark Kappelhoff, Deputy Assistant Attorneys General for the Civil Rights pision

Note: The sample MOU can be found at here.

President Obama established the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault one year ago. On this anniversary, the task force has released a sample memorandum of understanding (MOU) to assist campuses and law enforcement agencies to work together in their efforts to protect students, address the needs of sexual assault survivors, and ensure a prompt, thorough, and fair response to allegations of sexual misconduct. This is yet another important step in the task force’s effort to help colleges and universities, as well as their partners in the community, address the problem of campus sexual violence.

While colleges and universities can do much on their own, communication and collaboration between campus administrators, campus police and local law enforcement is critically important to address the problem of sexual assault on campus.

The sample MOU reflects input from task force members and agencies, outside experts on sexual assault, police associations, state attorneys general, and campus administrators and counsels.

Many colleges and universities already have MOUs in place with local law enforcement authorities covering a variety of areas. Our conversations with campus administrators, campus police, and law enforcement have underscored the need for additional tools and strategies that are specifically tailored to the dynamics of sexual assault on campus, as well as the needs of sexual assault survivors. The task force is providing this sample MOU with that in mind.

We recognize that every campus and community is unique and there is no one-size-fits-all solution. The sample MOU is, therefore, intended to be a starting point for a conversation between campus administrators, campus police and local law enforcement on how to improve collaborations between critical first responders. We fully expect that, in partnering to address the issue of sexual violence on campus, campus administrators and law enforcement will adapt the provisions of the sample MOU to meet their particular needs and circumstances. For example, some campus and law enforcement authorities may wish to incorporate some or all of the provisions into an existing general campus safety MOU, while others may prefer a standalone agreement specifically addressing campus sexual violence. Still others may decide that some different method of collaboration better meets their needs. We hope that this sample MOU will be an important resource in collaborative efforts between campus administrators, campus police and law enforcement to eradicate sexual assault from college communities nationwide.

Posted in: 

Civil Rights pision

Office on Violence Against Women

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Warning in WHITELAND: Government Grant Scams

“Because you pay your income taxes on time, you have been awarded a free $12,500 government grant! To get your grant, simply give us your checking account information, and we will direct-deposit the grant into your bank account!”

Sometimes, it’s an ad that claims you will qualify to receive a “free grant” to pay for education costs, home repairs, home business expenses, or unpaid bills. Other times, it’s a phone call supposedly from a “government” agency or some other organization with an official sounding name. In either case, the claim is the same: your application for a grant is guaranteed to be accepted, and you’ll never have to pay the money back.

But the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the nation’s consumer protection agency, says that “money for nothing” grant offers usually are scams, whether you see them in your local paper or a national magazine, or hear about them on the phone.

Some scam artists advertise “free grants” in the classifieds, inviting readers to call a toll-free number for more information. Others are more bold: they call you out of the blue. They lie about where they’re calling from, or they claim legitimacy using an official-sounding name like the “Federal Grants Administration.” They may ask you some basic questions to determine if you “qualify” to receive a grant. FTC attorneys say calls and come-ons for free money invariably are rip offs.

Grant scammers generally follow a script: they congratulate you on your eligibility, then ask for your checking account information so they can “deposit your grant directly into your account,” or cover a one-time “processing fee.” The caller may even reassure you that you can get a refund if you’re not satisfied. In fact, you’ll never see the grant they promise; they will disappear with your money.

The FTC says following a few basic rules can keep consumers from losing money to these “government grant” scams:

  • Don’t give out your bank account information to anyone you don’t know. Scammers pressure people to divulge their bank account information so that they can steal the money in the account. Always keep your bank account information confidential. Don’t share it unless you are familiar with the company and know why the information is necessary.
  • Don’t pay any money for a “free” government grant. If you have to pay money to claim a “free” government grant, it isn’t really free. A real government agency won’t ask you to pay a processing fee for a grant that you have already been awarded — or to pay for a list of grant-making institutions. The names of agencies and foundations that award grants are available for free at any public library or on the Internet. The only official access point for all federal grant-making agencies is www.grants.gov.
  • Look-alikes aren’t the real thing. Just because the caller says he’s from the “Federal Grants Administration” doesn’t mean that he is. There is no such government agency. Take a moment to check the blue pages in your telephone directory to bear out your hunch — or not.
  • Phone numbers can deceive. Some con artists use Internet technology to disguise their area code in caller ID systems. Although it may look like they’re calling from Washington, DC, they could be calling from anywhere in the world.
  • Take control of the calls you receive. If you want to reduce the number of telemarketing calls you receive, place your telephone number on the National Do Not Call Registry. To register online, visit donotcall.gov. To register by phone, call 1-888-382-1222 (TTY: 1-866-290-4236) from the phone number you wish to register.
  • File a complaint with the FTC. If you think you may have been a victim of a government grant scam, file a complaint with the FTC online, or call toll-free, 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357); TTY: 1-866-653-4261. The FTC enters Internet, telemarketing, identity theft, and other fraud-related complaints into Consumer Sentinel, a secure online database available to hundreds of civil and criminal law enforcement agencies in the U.S. and abroad.
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