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Sydnor, Bolen end track, field seasons at national meet


“It was a great experience for Jake and Marissa,” said Wilmington head coach Ron Combs. “They proved they belong amongst the nation’s elite in Division III.” Sydnor (Owensville, OH/Clermont Northeastern) ran in Friday’s 400 meter preliminarie

Local artist Bonnie Dougherty exhibiting at The Buttery through June


She lived in the Wilmington area for the next 40 years before coming back ...
In addition, her paintings are included in private collections in Pennsylvania, Maryland, Ohio, Virginia, New Jersey and Washington, D.C. There was a reception at The Buttery ...

Woods throws 9-inning shut out, improves to 4-1


He currently has a 1.19 earned run average. The difference? Easily his vastly improved breaking ball. “Oh yeah, absolutely,” agreed Wilmington Baseball Coach Aldo Caira. “His breaking ball is making his fastball look five miles per hour faster.

Wilmington Pike construction on pause for weekend


While the major roadwork along the Wilmington/Feedwire corridor will likely be completed by the start of summer, additional construction is expected in the area in the near future that could once again create some traffic issues. The Ohio Department of ...

Augusta man killed in I-71 collision


WILMINGTON, Ohio | An Augusta man was killed Wednesday morning in a collision on I-71 in Greene County, Ohio. According to Ohio State Highway Patrol, Milan Ilic, 60, from Baltimore, Maryland, was driving northbound on I-71 a 2005 Volvo semi when he slowed ...

Members of Congress Ask for Review of Dropped Espionage Case


Mrs. Chen has said in interviews that she would like her job back. She has not been back to her Wilmington, Ohio, office since the day she was escorted away in handcuffs by six F.B.I. agents. Representatives from the Commerce Department did not respond to ...

Gostomsky to play for Wilmington


Gostomsky is the second Darke County football player to join the Wilmington football team this year, joining Ansonia senior Dalton Subler. The Quakers are currently rebuilding as this past season they went 0-10 overall and 0-9 in the Ohio Athletic ...

OVI checkpoint gets desired result


WILMINGTON, Ohio (WDTN) – A good result from a weekend OVI checkpoint. The Wilmington Ohio State Highway Patrol Post says it checked 579 drivers in a three hour time span Friday night. Troopers say they made no arrests for OVI. Saturation patrols did ...

Hidden Hazing: Reports Of Abuse Rampant Across Ohio’s Colleges


Wilmington College, Southwest of Columbus, underwent one of Ohio's most abusive hazing criminal cases. Thirteen students and one 36-year-old advisor were convicted of a criminal charge of hazing after what happened at this fraternity house basement.

Falsely accused of spying, Weather Service employee’s life turned upside down


In October 2014, we heard an odd story about a National Weather Service employee in Ohio: the FBI announced that Xiafen “Sherry” Chen, a 59-year-old hydrologist at the Wilmington, Ohio, Weather Service office, was arrested — handcuffed and escorted ...

MISSING PET ALERT: Multiple Possible Buddy Sightings In Wilmington TODAY


WILMINGTON, MA — Buddy, a Wilmington dog missing since October, may have been spotted in town today! Owner Deborah Edgerly took to Facebook tonight to alert the community: “We are getting calls of po…

Pat Arrives In Wilmington


Pat's bus arrives at the Wilmington train station yesterday Pat arrived in Wilmington yesterday safe and sound (and pooped) from his 27 hour bus trip from his home in Toronto, Canada. There he is fol…

5 Things To Do In Wilmington Today (May 23, 2015)


Here are FIVE things to do today in Wilmington on Saturday, May 23, 2015. #1) The public is invited to participate in one of the town’s Memorial Day Weekend observances — decorating of veterans’ grav…

5 Things To Do In Wilmington Today (May 22, 2015)


Here are FIVE things to do today in Wilmington on Friday, May 22, 2015. #1) Stay in and watch the Wilmington-based Merrimack Valley Chorus compete on the Season Finale of “Sing That Thing” at 8pm at …

5 Things To Do In Wilmington Today (May 21, 2015)


Here are FIVE things to do today in Wilmington on Thursday, May 21, 2015; #1) Town Hall is hosting a public meeting of the Massachusetts Technical Assistance Partnership For Prevention at 10am on a d…

5 Things To Do In Wilmington Today (May 20, 2015)


Here are FIVE things to do today in Wilmington on Wednesday, May 20, 2015. #1) Red Heat Tavern (300 Lowell Street) is hosting a “Patio Kickoff” event from 6pm to 8pm, featuring live music, a summer c…

5 Things To Do In Wilmington Today (May 19, 2015)


Here are FIVE things to do today in Wilmington on Tuesday, May 19, 2015. #1) The 99 Restaurant (144 Lowell Street) is hosting a fundraiser for “Lottie’s Pearls,” a Wilmington Relay For Life Team, fro…

5 Things To Do In Wilmington Today (May 18, 2015)


Here are FIVE things to do today in Wilmington on Monday, May 18, 2015. #1) State Rep. Jim Miceli is holding his monthly office hours from 9:30am to 11am at the Senior Center and 6:30pm to 8pm at Tow…

5 Things To Do In Wilmington Today (May 17, 2015)


Here are FIVE things to do today in Wilmington on Sunday, May 17, 2015. #1) The Wilmington-Andover PMC Kids Ride will take place from 9am to noon at the Boutwell School/Carter Lane. 200 children are …

The Best Beaches in Wilmington, NC


Wilmington, NC is a wonderful coastal town with a relaxed atmosphere and a lot of charm. Visitors and locals alike enjoy the quaint downtown, historic homes, great restaurants, and parks. The town is …




SPECIAL INFORMATION FOR WILMINGTON

Having a vegetarian diet in WILMINGTON OHIO

Vegetarian diet

A vegetarian diet is a meal plan consisting mostly of plants such as vegetables, fruits, whole grains, legumes, seeds and nuts. A vegetarian diet has little or no animal products. Types of vegetarian diets include:
  • Vegan: Diet consists of only foods herbal.
  • Lacto-vegetarian: Diet consists of plant foods plus some or all dairy products.
  • Lacto-ovovegetarian: Diet consists of plant foods, dairy products and eggs.
  • Semi- or partial vegetarian: Diet consists of plant foods and may include chicken or fish, dairy products and eggs. It does not include red meat.

Functions

A well-planned vegetarian diet can provide good nutrition. A vegetarian diet often helps to have better health.Eating a vegetarian diet can help you:
  • Reduce the likelihood of obesity.
  • Reduce the risk of heart disease.
  • Lowering blood pressure.
  • Reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes.
Compared to those who are not vegetarians, vegetarians usually eat:
  • Fewer calories from fat (especially saturated fat).
  • Fewer calories overall.
  • More fiber, potassium and vitamin C.

Recommended

By following a vegetarian diet, consider the following:
  • Eat different foods, including vegetables, fruits, grains, nuts, seeds, whole grains and dairy products and eggs if your diet includes.
  • Cut back on foods that are high in fat, sugar and salt (sodium).
  • No redress the lack of a nutrient overeating other. For example, do not eat much rich fat cheese to replace meat.
  • Instead, choose protein sources that are low in fat, such as beans.
  • If necessary, take supplements if your diet lacks certain vitamins and minerals.
  • Learn to read the nutrition label on food packages. The label lists the ingredients and nutritional content of the food product.
  • If you follow a restricted diet, you may want to work with a nutritionist to ensure you´re getting enough nutrients.

Alternative Names

Lacto-ovo vegetarian; Semi-; Lacto; Partial vegetarian; Vegan

References

American Dietetic Association. Position of the American Dietetic Association: Vegetarian diets. J Am Diet Assoc . 2009; 109: 1266-1282. Craig WJ. Nutrition Concerns and health effects of vegetarian diets. Nutr Clin Pract . 2010; 25: 613-620. National Institutes of Health. Office of Dietary Supplements. Dietary Supplement Fact Sheets. Available at: ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/list-all. Accessed November 11, 2014. Stettler N, Bhatia J, Parish A, Stallings VA. Feeding healthy infants, children, and adolescents. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW III, Schor NF, Behrman RE, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics , 19th ed.Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier; 2011: chap 42. Thedford K, Raj S. A vegetarian diet for weight management. J Am Diet Assoc . 2011; 111: 816-818. United States Department of Agriculture. Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion. Dietary Guidelines for Americans . 2010. National Academy Press, Washington, DC 2010.
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WILMINGTON OHIO tspan:3m WILMINGTON OHIO




The situation of health coverage in in WILMINGTON OHIO

1. After five years of the Affordable Care Act, more than 16 million people have health coverage.

That's more people than the populations of New York City, Los Angeles, and Chicago combined. This number includes parents who can finally afford to take their kids to the doctor, families who no longer risk losing their homes or savings because someone becomes ill, and young people who are now free to pursue their dreams without worrying about losing access to health care. 

With millions of people getting covered, the uninsured rate for non-elderly adults has dropped by 35% since October 2013. “The Affordable Care Act is working,” President Obama said after hearing the news that millions of Americans had signed up and gotten covered. “And I'll tell you, everywhere I go around the country, I'm meeting inpiduals who come up and thank me. How passionate they are about the difference it's made in their lives, it really reminds me why we do all of this." 


2. Medicaid is helping millions.

The Affordable Care Act allows states to expand eligibility for Medicaid, and 28 states and the District of Columbia have done so. Across all 50 states, there are 11.2 million additional Americans enrolled in Medicaid compared to a baseline period in the fall of 2013.

While not every state expanded Medicaid, those that did are seeing especially strong coverage gains. In Medicaid expansion states, the uninsured rate among families with incomes below 138 percent of the federal poverty line declined by 13 percentage points, nearly double the decline in non-expansion states.


3. Those with pre-existing conditions can no longer be denied health insurance.

Prior to the Affordable Care Act, health insurance companies could deny you coverage or charge you more because of a health problem that you had prior to applying for insurance. Thanks to the Affordable Care Act, health insurance companies can’t refuse to cover you just because you have a pre-existing condition and they can’t close you out of coverage by charging you more than someone who doesn’t have a pre-existing condition.

This key provision means that up to 129 million Americans with pre-existing conditions are no longer at risk of being denied coverage. This includes the parents of over 17.6 million children with pre-existing conditions who no longer have to live with that worry. 


4. The uninsured rate for young Americans is at its lowest point since at least 1997.

Thanks to the Affordable Care Act, the uninsured rate for young Americans has declined by more than 40 percent over the past five years. Since 2010, more than 5 million young adults have gained coverage.  This includes 2.3 million young adults who have gained coverage by being able to stay on their parent's health plan. Under the Affordable Care Act, young adults can stay on their parent’s coverage until age 26. With all that can happens in a young person's life, this provision helps ensure that those who are just starting out in college and work careers can plan with the assurance that they have access to quality and affordable coverage. 


5. Americans no longer have lifetime and annual limits on their coverage.

The Affordable Care Act has lifted the lifetime health benefit caps for 105 million Americans. Previously, many plans set a lifetime limit on how much they would spend for your covered benefits during the entire time you were enrolled in their plan. If you went over, you’d be paying out of pocket. Annual limits also constrained families and inpiduals by restricting how much they could receive per year. That's not how it should be. That’s why the Affordable Care Act prohibits health plans from putting annual or lifetime dollar limits on most benefits. 


These are just five of the core ways in which the Affordable Care Act has helped Americans get quality, affordable health care. See for yourself: Click here to meet inpiduals who have benefited from health care, read their stories, and then pass them on so others can see what getting covered -- and staying covered -- means. 

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Make Your Health Benefits Work for You in WILMINGTON OHIO

The Department of Labor´s Employee Benefits Security Administration (EBSA) administers several important health benefit laws covering employer-based health plans. They govern your basic rights to information about how your health plan works, how to qualify for benefits, and how to make claims for benefits.

In addition, there are specific laws protecting your right to health benefits when you lose coverage or change jobs. EBSA also oversees health care laws covering special medical conditions. For more information on the laws that protect your benefits, see EBSA´s Website. Or call the agency toll free at 1-866-444-3272 to reach a regional office near you. These 10 tips can help make your health benefits work better for you.

1. Explore Your Options for Health Coverage

You have options for health coverage. There are many different types of health benefit plans. Find out what your employer offers, then check out the plan (or plans). Your employer´s human resource office, the health plan administrator, or your union can provide information to help you match your needs and preferences with the available plans. Or consider a health plan through the Health Insurance Marketplace. Visit HealthCare.gov to see the health plan options available in your area. Get information about all of your options and review it. The more information you have, the better your health care decisions will be.

2. Review the Benefits Available

Do the plans offered cover the benefits that are important to you, such as mental health services, well-baby care, vision or dental care? Are there deductibles? What are the out-of-pocket expenses you may face? Determine your needs and priorities. Compare all of your options before you decide which coverage to elect. Matching your needs and those of your family members will result in the best possible benefits. Cheapest may not always be best. Your goal is high quality health benefits.

3. Read Your Plan´s Summary Plan Description (SPD) for the Wealth of Information It Provides

Your health plan administrator should provide a copy. It outlines your benefits and your legal rights under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA), the Federal law that protects your health benefits. It also should contain information about the coverage of dependents, what services will require a co-payment or coinsurance, and the circumstances under which your employer can change or terminate a health benefits plan. You also can find many of the answers to your questions in the Summary of Benefits and Coverage (SBC), a short, easy-to-understand summary of what a plan covers and what it costs. You should receive a copy with your enrollment materials. Save the SPD, the SBC, and all other health plan brochures and documents, along with memos or correspondence from your employer relating to health benefits.

4. Use Your Health Coverage

Once your health coverage has started, use it to help cover medical costs for services like going to the doctor, filling prescriptions or getting emergency care. Using your benefits will help you and your family stay healthy and reduce your health care costs. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) provides many valuable protections for people enrolled in employment-based health plans including prohibiting preexisting condition exclusions and annual and lifetime limits on essential health benefits. What’s more, many plans cover certain preventive services for free, including routine vaccinations, regular well-baby and well-child visits, blood pressure, diabetes and cholesterol tests, and many cancer screenings. You also can keep your children on your health plan until age 26. Take advantage of your benefits, especially free preventive care if your plan covers it. If you were required to pay cost-sharing for a preventive service, check your Explanation of Benefits and ensure that the provider billed the service properly.

5. Understand Your Plan’s Mental Health and Substance Use Coverage

Many health plans provide coverage for mental health and substance use disorder benefits. If a plan does offer these benefits, the financial requirements (such as co-payments and deductibles) and the quantitative treatment limits (such as visit limits) for the mental health and substance use disorder benefits cannot be more restrictive than the financial requirements or treatment limits applied to medical/surgical benefits. Plans also cannot impose lifetime and annual limits on the dollar amount of mental health and substance use disorder services, including behavioral health treatment. Some plans cover preventive services like screenings for depression and child behavioral assessments for free. Check your SPD and SBC to find out what your plan covers.

6. Look For Wellness Programs

More employers are establishing wellness programs that encourage employees to work out, stop smoking, and generally adopt healthier lifestyles. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and the ACA encourage group health plans to adopt wellness programs but also includes protections for employees and dependents from impermissible discrimination based on a health factor. These programs often provide rewards such as cost savings as well as promoting good health. Check your SPD and SBC to see whether your plan offers a wellness program(s). If your plan does, find out what reward is offered and what you need to do to receive it.

7. Know How to File an Appeal if Your Health Benefits Claim is Denied

Understand your plan’s procedures for filing a claim for benefits and where to make appeals of the plan´s decisions. Pay attention to time limits – make sure you timely file claims and appeals and that the plan makes decisions on time. Keep records and copies of correspondence. Check your health benefits package and your SPD to determine who is responsible for handling problems with benefit claims. Contact EBSA for assistance if you are unable to obtain a response to your complaint.

8. Assess Your Benefits Coverage as Your Family Status Changes

Marriage, Porce, childbirth or adoption, the death of a spouse, and aging out of a parent’s health plan are life events that may signal a need to change your health benefits. You, your spouse, and your dependent children may be eligible for special enrollment into other employer health coverage or through the Health Insurance Marketplace. Even without life-changing events, the information provided by your employer should tell you how you can change benefits or switch plans. If you’re considering special enrollment, act quickly. You have 30 days after the life event to request special enrollment in other employer coverage or 60 days to select a plan in the Marketplace.

9. Be Aware that Changing Jobs and Other Work Events Can Affect Your Health Benefits

If you change employers or lose your job, you may need to find other health coverage. If you have a new job, consider enrolling in your new employer’s plan. Whether starting or losing a job, you may be eligible to special enroll in a spouse’s employer-sponsored plan or through the Health Insurance Marketplace. Under the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act – better known as COBRA – you, your covered spouse, and your dependent children may be eligible to continue coverage under your former employer-sponsored plan. This coverage is temporary (generally 18 to 36 months) and you may have to pay the entire premium plus a 2 percent administrative charge. Get information on your coverage options and compare. Be aware of the deadlines for deciding on coverage and find out when your new coverage will be effective.

10. Plan For Retirement

Before you retire, find out what health benefits, if any, extend to you and your spouse during your retirement years. Consult with your employer´s human resources office, your union, or the plan administrator. Check your SPD and other plan documents. Make sure there is no conflicting information among these sources about the benefits you will receive or the circumstances under which they can change or be eliminated. With this information in hand, you can make other important choices, like finding out if you are eligible for Medicare and Medigap insurance coverage. If you want to retire before you are eligible for Medicare and your employer does not provide health benefits in retirement, consider what you will do for health coverage. Your options may include enrolling in a spouse’s employer plan or in a Marketplace plan or temporarily continuing your employer coverage by electing COBRA. Planning for retirement includes planning for your health coverage in retirement. To find out more, read Taking the Mystery Out of Retirement Planning.

These Laws Can Help

  • The Employee Retirement Income Security Act – Offers protection for inPiduals enrolled in retirement, health, and other benefit plans sponsored by private-sector employers, and provides rights to information and a claims and appeals process for participants to get benefits from their plans.
  • The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act – Creates the Health Insurance Marketplace and provides protections for employment-based health coverage, including extending dependent coverage of children to age 26; prohibiting preexisting condition exclusions and prohibiting lifetime and annual limits on essential health benefits.
  • The Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act – Contains provisions giving certain former employees, retirees, spouses, and dependent children the right to purchase temporary continuation of group health plan coverage at group rates in specific instances.
  • The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act – Allows employees, their spouses and their dependents to enroll in employer-provided health coverage regardless of open enrollment periods if they lose coverage or in the event of marriage, birth, adoption or placement for adoption. Also prohibits discrimination in health care coverage.
  • The Women´s Health and Cancer Rights Act – Offers protections for breast cancer patients who elect breast reconstruction in connection with a mastectomy.
  • The Newborns´ and Mothers´ Health Protection Act – Provides rules on minimum coverage for hospital lengths of stay following childbirth.
  • The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act – Prohibits discrimination in group health plan premiums based on genetic information. Also, generally prohibits group health plans from requesting genetic information or requiring genetic tests.
  • The Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act and the Mental Health Parity Act – Requires parity in financial requirements and treatment limitations for mental health and substance use benefits with those for medical and surgical benefits.
  • The Children´s Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act – Allows special enrollment in a group health plan if an employee or dependents lose coverage under CHIP or Medicaid or are eligible for premium assistance under those programs.

For More Information

Visit the Employee Benefits Security Administration’s Website to view the following publications. To order copies or to request assistance from a benefits advisor, contact EBSA electronically or call toll free 1-866-444-3272.

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