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Latest News - YELLVILLE ARKANSAS

ASUMH announces CNA graduates


Those receiving their CNA certifications included Makayla Devore of Yellville, AR; Amy Smith of Gainesville, MO; George Cornelson of Mountain Home; Tyler Prine of Gainesville, MO; Breelyn Arms of Mountain Home; Payden Quarles of Clarkridge, AR; Tamika ...

Sheriff: Alexander man shot wife at campground


YELLVILLE — Arkansas authorities say an Alexander man is facing an attempted murder charge after shooting his wife at a national park. Marion County Sheriff Roger Vickers says 51-year-old John Prickett Jr. faces an attempted first-degree murder charge.

Wayne James


He was born November 18, 1936 in Yellville, Arkansas to Garland James and Carolyn Ott. He married Alvonda Poorboy May 29, 1958 in Batesville Arkansas. He is survived by his wife; Alvonda James, sons, Dave James, Robert James, daughter Lisa James ...

Yellville's Kelsie Davenport joins 'Party Down South 2'


On the Party Down South 2 website, this is how Kelsie is described: "This 21-year-old student is from Yellville, Arkansas. She's currently single and all the guys know she is bad news. Kelsie likes to take shots and likes to funnel. Don't cross her because ...

Phillips Media Group acquires Arkansas and Missouri newspapers from Community Publishers, Inc.


The Phillips family and their companies have been involved in the newspaper business since the 1970s, having owned newspapers in Mountain Home, Yellville, Berryville and Eureka Springs, AR, and Nevada, Marshall and Maryville, MO. Phillips Media Group’s ...

Tobacco tax cash helps pay for health clinic


Tobacco users in Arkansas are doing more than paying a tax on cigarettes or chew. They're paying for health care clinics. KY3's Paul Adler recently visited a new clinic in Yellville, Arkansas to see what's inside and find out how it's going. Nurse ...

Edwin Lande


Edwin Merle Lande, age 78, of Yellville, Arkansas passed away peacefully in his sleep Sunday ...
Mr. Lande is survived by his wife, Theda, of the home; one daughter, Tamara Stier of Denver, Colorado; two step-daughters: Julie Goenner of Foley, Minnesota ...

13 homemade bombs found outside convicted felon's home in Yellville


YELLVILLE, Ar A convicted Ozarks felon is back behind bars after officers say he was shooting at nearby houses. Marion county, Arkansas deputies say Jimmy Stevens shot a shotgun and fireworks toward nearby homes and was threatening to kill anyone who came ...

Yellville-Summit school no longer in financial trouble


YELLVILLE, Ar. -- The Yellville-Summit school is no longer on the state list of districts in financial trouble. The Arkansas education department says the school had an over-staffing problem and was spending too much on portable classrooms. Yellville has ...

Yellville, Arkansas Vacation Rentals


Yellville, Arkansas offers great vacation house rental and home rental-by-owner deals for the knowledgeable traveler. No matter what budget or level of comfort you seek in your holiday to Yellville, AR, there's surely a great local vacation home rental ...

PRESS RELEASE III GUNS IN THE HANDS OF ARTISTS opens tomorrow at The Aspen Institute


International Art Stars Turn Guns from the Streets of New Orleans into Works of Art at Aspen Ideas Festival and Aspen Action Forum The Aspen Institute announces Guns in the Hands of Artists exhibi…

ASUMH Announces Recent CNA Graduates


June 2015 CNA Graduates Arkansas State University-Mountain Home (ASUMH) recently held a ceremony honoring graduates of the Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) program. Graduates completed 99 hours of c…
Jobs from Indeed




SPECIAL INFORMATION FOR YELLVILLE

Advices to people with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in YELLVILLE ARKANSAS

What is irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)?

Irritable bowel syndrome* (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder, meaning that the symptoms are caused by changes in how the GI tract works. The GI tract is a series of hollow organs joined in a long, twisting tube from the mouth to the anus—the opening where stool leaves your body. Food is digested, or broken down, in the GI tract.

The organs of the GI tract

*See the Pronunciation Guide for tips on how to say words in bold type.

IBS is a group of symptoms that occur together, not a disease. Symptoms can come and go repeatedly without signs of damage to the GI tract.

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What are the symptoms of IBS?

The most common symptoms of IBS include pain or discomfort in your abdomen—the area between your chest and hips—and changes in your bowel habits. The pain or discomfort of IBS may be reported as cramping and

  • starts when you have bowel movements more or less often than usual
  • starts when your stool appears looser and more watery or harder and more lumpy than usual
  • goes away after a bowel movement

The changes in bowel habits with IBS may be diarrhea, constipation, or both.

Symptoms of diarrhea are

  • passing stools three or more times a day
  • having loose, watery stools
  • feeling an urgent need to have a bowel movement

Symptoms of constipation are

  • passing fewer than three stools in a week
  • having hard, dry stools
  • straining to have a bowel movement

Some people with IBS have only diarrhea or only constipation. Some people have symptoms of both diarrhea and constipation or have diarrhea sometimes and constipation other times. People often have symptoms after eating a meal.

Other symptoms of IBS are

  • whitish mucus—a clear liquid made by the intestines—in the stool
  • a swollen or bloated abdomen
  • the feeling that you haven’t finished a bowel movement

Women with IBS often have more symptoms during their menstrual periods.

IBS is a chronic disorder, meaning it lasts a long time, often years. However, the symptoms may come and go. You may have IBS if

  • you have had symptoms at least three times a month for the past 3 months
  • your symptoms first started at least 6 months ago

While IBS can be painful, it doesn’t lead to other health problems or damage the GI tract.

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What causes IBS?

Doctors are not sure what causes IBS. Researchers are studying the following possible causes of IBS:

  • Brain-gut signal problems. Signals between your brain and the nerves of your gut, or small and large intestines, control how your gut works. Problems with brain-gut signals may cause IBS symptoms, such as changes in your bowel habits and pain or discomfort.
  • Colon muscle problems. The muscles of your colon, part of your large intestine, may not work normally. The muscles may contract, or tighten, too much. These contractions may move stool through your gut too quickly, causing cramping and diarrhea during or shortly after a meal, or slow the movement of stool, causing constipation.
  • Sensitive nerves. The nerves in your gut may be extra sensitive, causing you to feel more pain or discomfort than normal when gas or stool is in the gut.
  • Mental health issues. Psychological, or mental health, issues such as anxiety or depression may be related to IBS in some people. Stress can make the nerves of your gut more sensitive, causing more discomfort and emotional distress.
  • Infections. A bacterial infection in the GI tract may cause some people to develop IBS.
  • Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Normally, few bacteria live in the small intestine. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth is an increase in the number or a change in the type of bacteria in the small intestine. These bacteria can produce extra gas and may also cause diarrhea and weight loss. Some researchers believe small intestinal bacterial overgrowth may lead to IBS; however, more research is needed to show a link between the two conditions.
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How is IBS diagnosed?

Your doctor may be able to diagnose IBS based on your symptoms. Your doctor may not need to do medical tests or may do a limited number of tests.

Your doctor will ask about your

  • medical history
  • eating habits
  • medicine use

Your doctor will look for a certain pattern in your symptoms. Your doctor can diagnose IBS by using symptom-based standards such as the Rome criteria. Based on the Rome criteria, IBS may be diagnosed if

  • your symptoms started at least 6 months ago
  • you have had abdominal pain or discomfort at least three times a month for the past 3 months
  • your abdominal pain or discomfort has two or three of the following features:
    • Your pain or discomfort improves after a bowel movement.
    • When your pain or discomfort starts, you notice a change in how often you have a bowel movement.
    • When your pain or discomfort starts, you notice a change in the way your stools look.

Your doctor will also conduct a physical exam and may perform blood tests to make sure you don’t have other health problems. IBS can have the same symptoms as other health problems, so more tests may be needed. If any blood tests suggest you may have another health problem, your doctor might also perform the following tests:

  • Stool test. A stool test is used to check stool for blood or parasites, which are tiny organisms found in contaminated food or water. Your doctor will give you a container for catching and storing the stool. You will return the stool sample to your doctor or a commercial facility. The sample will be sent to a lab to check for blood or parasites. Your doctor may also check for blood in stool by examining your rectum—the lower end of the large intestine leading to the anus—during your physical exam.
  • Flexible sigmoidoscopy. Flexible sigmoidoscopy is used to look inside your rectum and lower colon. This test is used to look inside the rectum and lower colon. The test is performed at a hospital or an outpatient center by a gastroenterologist—a doctor who specializes in digestive diseases. Anesthesia is usually not needed. Your doctor will give you written bowel prep instructions to follow at home before the test. You may need to follow a clear liquid diet for 1 to 3 days before the test. You may also need a laxative or enema the night before the test. You may also have one or more enemas about 2 hours before the procedure.

    For the test, you will lie on a table while the doctor inserts a flexible tube into your anus. A small camera on the tube sends a video image of the intestinal lining to a computer screen. The test can show problems in the rectum or lower colon that may be causing your symptoms.

    You can usually go back to your normal diet after the test, though you may have cramping or bloating during the first hour after the test.
  • Colonoscopy. Colonoscopy is used to look inside your rectum and entire colon. The test is performed at a hospital or an outpatient center by a gastroenterologist. You’ll be given a light sedative and possibly pain medicine to help you relax. Your doctor will give you written bowel prep instructions to follow at home before the test. You may need to follow a clear liquid diet for 1 to 3 days before the test. You may need to take laxatives and enemas the evening before the test.

    For the test, you will lie on a table while the doctor inserts a flexible tube into your anus. A small camera on the tube sends a video image of the intestinal lining to a computer screen. The test can show problems in your colon that may be causing your symptoms.

    Cramping or bloating may occur during the first hour after the test. Driving is not permitted for 24 hours after the test so that the sedative can wear off. Before the appointment, you should make plans for a ride home. By the next day, you should fully recover and go back to your normal diet.
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How is IBS treated?

Irritable bowel syndrome is treated by relieving symptoms through

  • changes in eating, diet, and nutrition
  • medicine
  • probiotics
  • psychological therapy

You may have to try a few treatments to see what works best for you. Your doctor can help you find the right treatment plan.

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Eating, Diet, and Nutrition

Eating large meals can cause cramping and diarrhea in some people with IBS. If you experience these symptoms, try to change your eating patterns by eating four or five small meals a day.

Certain foods or drinks may make symptoms worse, such as

  • foods high in fat
  • some milk products
  • drinks with alcohol or caffeine
  • drinks with large amounts of artificial sweeteners, which are used in place of sugar
  • beans, cabbage, and other foods that may cause gas

To find out if certain foods trigger your symptoms, keep a diary and track

  • what you eat during the day
  • what symptoms you have
  • when symptoms occur

Take your notes to your doctor and talk about which foods seem to make your symptoms worse. You may need to avoid these foods or eat less of them.

Fiber may improve constipation symptoms caused by IBS because it makes stool soft and easier to pass. Fiber is found in foods such as whole-grain breads and cereals, beans, fruits, and vegetables. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommends that adults consume 21 to 38 grams of fiber a day.

While fiber may help constipation, it may not be enough to treat the abdominal discomfort or pain of IBS. In fact, some people with IBS may feel a bit more abdominal discomfort after adding more fiber to their diet. Add foods with fiber a little at a time to let your body get used to them. Too much fiber at once can cause gas, which can trigger symptoms in people with IBS.

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Medicine

Your doctor may give you medicine help relieve symptoms. Follow your doctor’s instructions when you use medicine to treat IBS. Talk with your doctor about possible side effects and what to do if you have them.

These medicines can lessen the symptoms of IBS:

  • Laxatives treat constipation. Many kinds of laxatives are available. Your doctor can help you find the right laxative for you.
  • Loperamide (Imodium) treats diarrhea.
  • Antispasmodics help reduce muscle spasms in the intestines and help ease abdominal pain.
  • Antidepressants in low doses can help relieve IBS symptoms.
  • Lubiprostone (Amitiza) is prescribed for people who have IBS with constipation.
  • Linaclotide (Linzess) is also prescribed for people who have IBS with constipation.

The antibiotic rifaximin can reduce bloating by treating small intestinal bacterial overgrowth; however, scientists are still debating the use of antibiotics to treat IBS and more research is needed.

Probiotics

Probiotics are live microorganisms—tiny organisms that can be seen only with a microscope. These microorganisms, most often bacteria, are like the microorganisms normally found in your GI tract. Studies have found that probiotics taken in large enough amounts improve symptoms of IBS; however, more research is needed. Probiotics can be found in dietary supplements, such as capsules, tablets, and powders, and in some foods, such as yogurt. Talk with your doctor before using probiotics, supplements, or any other complementary or alternative medical treatment. Read more at www.nccam.nih.gov/health/probiotics.

Psychological Therapy

Psychological therapy can help improve IBS symptoms.

  • Talk therapy. Talk therapy may reduce stress and improve IBS symptoms. Two types of talk therapy used to treat IBS are cognitive behavioral therapy and psychodynamic, or interpersonal, therapy. Cognitive behavioral therapy focuses on your thoughts and actions. Psychodynamic therapy focuses on how your emotions affect your IBS symptoms.
  • Gut-directed hypnotherapy. In hypnotherapy, a therapist may help relax the muscles in your colon by putting you into a trancelike state.
  • Mindfulness training. Mindfulness training can teach you to focus your attention on sensations occurring at the moment and to avoid catastrophizing, or worrying about the meaning of those sensations.
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Does stress cause IBS?

Although stress does not cause IBS, if you already have IBS, stress can make your symptoms worse. In addition, simply having IBS symptoms can produce stress.

Learning to reduce stress can help improve IBS. With less stress, you may find you have less cramping and pain. You may also find it easier to manage your symptoms.

Meditation, exercise, hypnosis, and counseling may help lessen IBS symptoms. Getting enough sleep and changing life situations to make them less stressful may also help. You may need to try different activities to see what works best for you.

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Points to Remember

  • Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder, meaning symptoms are caused by changes in how the GI tract works.
  • IBS is a group of symptoms that occur together, not a disease. Symptoms can come and go repeatedly without signs of damage to the GI tract.
  • The most common symptoms of IBS include pain or discomfort in your abdomen—the area between your chest and hips—and changes in your bowel habits.
  • While IBS can be painful, it doesn’t lead to other health problems or damage the GI tract.
  • Doctors are not sure what causes IBS. Researchers are studying the following possible causes of IBS:
    • brain-gut signal problems
    • colon muscle problems
    • sensitive nerves
    • mental health issues
    • infections
    • small intestinal bacterial overgrowth
  • Your doctor may be able to diagnose IBS based on your symptoms. Your doctor may not need to do medical tests or may do a limited number of tests.
  • IBS is treated by relieving symptoms through
    • changes in eating, diet, and nutrition
    • medicine
    • probiotics
    • psychological therapy
  • Although stress does not cause IBS, if you already have IBS, stress can make your symptoms worse.
[Top]

Hope through Research

The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases’ (NIDDK’s) pision of Digestive Diseases and Nutrition conducts and supports basic and clinical research into many digestive disorders.

Clinical trials are research studies involving people. Clinical trials look at safe and effective new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. Researchers also use clinical trials to look at other aspects of care, such as improving the quality of life for people with chronic illnesses. To learn more about clinical trials, why they matter, and how to participate, visit the NIH Clinical Research Trials and You website at www.nih.gov/health/clinicaltrials. For information about current studies, visit www.ClinicalTrials.gov.

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Pronunciation Guide

abdomen (AB-doh-men)

abdominal (ab-DOM-ih-nuhl)

antidepressants (AN-tee-dee-PRESS-uhnts)

antispasmodics (AN-tee-spaz-MOD-iks)

anus (AY-nuhss)

chronic (KRON-ik)

cognitive (KOG-nih-tiv)

colon (KOH-lon)

colonoscopy (KOH-lon-OSS-kuh-pee)

constipation (KON-stih-PAY-shuhn)

diarrhea (DY-uh-REE-uh)

enema (EN-uh-muh)

flexible sigmoidoscopy (FLEK-suh-buhl) (SIG-moy-DOSS-kuh-pee)

functional (FUHNK-shuhn-uhl)

gastroenterologist (GASS-troh-EN-tur-OL-uh-jist)

gastrointestinal (GASS-troh-in-TESS-tin-uhl)

hypnotherapy (HIP-noh-THAIR-uh-pee)

interpersonal (IN-tur-PUR-suhn-uhl)

intestines (in-TESS-tinz)

irritable bowel syndrome (IHR-ih-tuh-buhl) (boul) (SIN-drohm)

laxative (LAK-suh-tiv)

mucus (MYOO-kuhss)

probiotics (PROH-by-OT-iks)

psychodynamic (SY-koh-dy-NAM-ik)

psychological (SY-koh-LOJ-ih-kuhl)

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For More Information

American Neurogastroenterology and Motility Society
45685 Harmony Lane
Belleville, MI 48111
Phone: 734–699–1130
Fax: 734–699–1136
Email: admin@motilitysociety.org
Internet: www.motilitysociety.org

International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders
700 West Virginia Street, Suite 201
Milwaukee, WI 53204
Phone: 1–888–964–2001 or 414–964–1799
Fax: 414–964–7176
Email: iffgd@iffgd.org
Internet: www.iffgd.org

Rome Foundation, Inc.
P.O. Box 6524
Raleigh, NC 27628
Phone: 919–539–3051
Fax: 919–900–7646
Email: mpickard@theromefoundation.org
Internet: www.romecriteria.org

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Acknowledgments

Publications produced by the Clearinghouse are carefully reviewed by both NIDDK scientists and outside experts. This publication was reviewed by Douglas A. Drossman, M.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Thank you also to the Salvation Army, SE Corps, Washington, D.C., for facilitating field-testing of the original version of this publication.

The U.S. Government does not endorse or favor any specific commercial product or company. Trade, proprietary, or company names appearing in this document are used only because they are considered necessary in the context of the information provided. If a product is not mentioned, the omission does not mean or imply that the product is unsatisfactory.

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National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse

2 Information Way
Bethesda, MD 20892–3570
Phone: 1–800–891–5389
TTY: 1–866–569–1162
Fax: 703–738–4929
Email: nddic@info.niddk.nih.gov
Internet: www.digestive.niddk.nih.gov

The National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NDDIC) is a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). The NIDDK is part of the National Institutes of Health of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Established in 1980, the Clearinghouse provides information about digestive diseases to people with digestive disorders and to their families, health care professionals, and the public. The NDDIC answers inquiries, develops and distributes publications, and works closely with professional and patient organizations and Government agencies to coordinate resources about digestive diseases.

This publication is not copyrighted. The Clearinghouse encourages users of this publication to duplicate and distribute as many copies as desired.

This publication may contain information about medications and, when taken as prescribed, the conditions they treat. When prepared, this publication included the most current information available. For updates or for questions about any medications, contact the U.S. Food and Drug Administration toll-free at 1–888–INFO–FDA (1–888–463–6332) or visit www.fda.gov. Consult your health care provider for more information.


NIH Publication No. 13–4686
September 2013

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Page last updated October 16, 2013

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YELLVILLE ARKANSAS tspan:3m YELLVILLE ARKANSAS




Buying prescription drugs via the Internet: A consumer guide to YELLVILLE ARKANSAS

The Internet has changed the way we live, work and even as bought. The advance of the Internet has made it possible to compare prices and buy products without having to leave the house. But when used for medicine is important to be very careful. Some websites sell drugs that are not legitimate, putting their health at risk.

For example, some websites that sell medicines:

  • They are not licensed pharmacies with state of the United States or are not really pharmacies.

  • They can give an incorrect diagnosis or sell you a drug that is not appropriate for your medical condition.

  • Do not protect your personal data (eg social security number and credit cards).

Some of the drugs that are sold on the Internet:

  • They are fake (counterfeit or adulterated).

  • They are very strong medicine dose or very low concentration.

  • They contain ingredients that can be harmful to your health.

  • They are expired or expired medicines.

  • They have not been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA for its acronym in English), or have not been studied for their safety and efficacy.

  • They have been prepared using safe standards.

  • They are not safe for use with other medicines or products you use.

  • No right or have not been properly stored or shipped labels.

TALK TO YOUR DOCTOR BEFORE TAKING ANY MEDICINE FOR THE FIRST TIME

  • Talk to your doctor and get a physical before taking any medicine for the first time.

  • Use only medications that have been prescribed by your doctor or other health professional you trust, who is licensed in the United States to give prescriptions or prescriptions.

  • Ask your doctor if you have to do something specific for your prescription.

The following information will help protect (a) if you purchase medicines via the Internet:

KNOW WHERE YOUR MEDICINES COME TO MAKE SURE THEY ARE SAFE

Make sure that the website where you buy your drugs is state-licensed pharmacy in the United States and you are located in the United States. Pharmacies and pharmacists in the United States must be licensed by a state pharmacy board. The pharmacy board of the state where you reside, you can tell if the website you use is a state-licensed pharmacy if you have good reputation, and if you are located in the United States. For a list of state pharmaceutical boards in English at the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy (NABP) whose website is:www.nabp.net . For information in Spanish call toll free 1-866-SU-FAMILIA (1-866-783-2645), the Li line Telefónica Health National Hispanic Family.

The NABP is a professional association of pharmaceutical state boards. This association has a program that will help you find some of the pharmacies that are licensed to sell through the Internet. The websites where the hallmark of this program appears, have been checked to ensure they comply with federal and state regulations. For more information in English about this program and for a list of pharmacies where VIPPS® (Verified Internet Pharmacy Practice Sites ™) seal appears, visit the website: www.vipps.info . For information in Spanish call toll free 1-866-SU-FAMILIA (1-866-783-2645) National Helpline Hispanic Family Health.

. Find the websites whose practices are designed to protect you a secure website should:

  • Be located in the United States and be licensed by the state pharmacy board which operates the website (visit the website www.nabp.net for a list of state pharmaceutical boards in English). For information in Spanish call toll free 1-866-SU-FAMILIA (1-866-783-2645) National Helpline Hispanic Family Health.

  • Have a licensed pharmacist who can answer your questions.

  • Require a prescription from your doctor or other health professional who is licensed in the United States to give prescriptions or prescriptions.

  • Having a medium through which you can talk to a person if you have any problem.

MAKE SURE YOUR PRIVACY IS PROTECTED

Note that the privacy and security of the site you will find easy to use and understand.

Do not give any personal information (such as your Social Security number, the number of your credit card or your medical history) unless you are sure the website will keep the protected information and not made public.

Ensure that the website will not sell your personal information unless you authorize it.

PROTECT YOURSELF AND OTHERS

Report the web sites you do not feel safe (a), or those for which you have complaints. Visit the website www.fda.gov/buyonline and click under "Notify the FDA sites web troubled "to fill the form in Spanish.

[17]




Cautions with Jasbug in YELLVILLE ARKANSAS

The "Jasbug" is a flaw in the way that computers have access to a network. If any of the hackers had known this since 2000, they could have used to infiltrate computer systems company and take complete control.

Suppose you use your laptop and public access to Wi-Fi to connect to the office computers. Hackers nearby could spy, steal documents or introduce malware ... I mean, everything.

There is still no evidence that someone has taken advantage of Jasbug and did this. But it may be too early to say.

Microsoft considered that the gravity of this situation was "critical". Even Alert guaranteed by the Department of Homeland Security and similar warnings from major companies in cybersecurity.

Jasbug affects everything from Windows Vista to Windows 8.1 newer. This is the kind of problem that will give you many headaches for system administrators and IT staff of the company.

Some mistakes are too embedded in the code. The Jasbug was so embedded that Microsoft had to return to restructure some basic parts of Windows.

Consider this another example of that small defects embedded in computer code could give you problems later. In fact, Microsoft did not even find on your own.

Jeff Schmidt, an independent researcher JAS Global Advisors in Chicago, discovered a year ago while working on another project. He alerted Microsoft and have since worked together to fix this error.

Why it took so long to fix it? Jasbug is a problem with the design of the Microsoft operating system itself. The company had to restructure basic parts of your engine giant ... and test it thoroughly to make sure it still worked fine.

Microsoft can not afford to make arrangements affecting a complete system. Remember that according Netmarketshare, Windows is used by 91% of computers worldwide. [10]










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If people in the media cannot decide whether they are in the
business of reporting news or manufacturing propaganda,
it is all the more important that the public understand
that difference,and choose their news sources accordingly.
Thomas Sowell

Newsof.org. Selected the top stories of the city of YELLVILLE ARKANSAS. Political events, traffic accidents on highways, downtown events, neighborhoods and inside. Also researched local newspapers and social networks, as well as the site of City Hall. Crimes, are always subject to demand generally for information. Also the tragedies and disasters such as fires, floods, flooding, rain, hail and winds. Tags: Breaking News, YELLVILLE ARKANSAS, City, Indoors, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday , Friday, Saturday, Sunday, Car, Crash, Elections, Beating, Accident, Crime, Police, Criminal, Police, Road, Highway Access, Elections, Party, Hail, Rain, Flood, Anniversary, Award, Month, Week End , Today, Yesterday, Female, Male, Family, Child, People.